Tagged With "hiking"

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Re: Pesuta Shipwreck, Naikoon Provincial Park, Haida-Gwaii, British Columbia

Former Member ·
These photos are evocative. Makes me very glad not to be a sailor back in the day. I have seen some of the many trees washed up on the beaches of the Pacific Northwest. Those are also very impressive. Did you find any glass floats ? I used to have a number of the ones used by Japanese fisherman to hold up their nets. You never know what will turn up.
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Re: Pesuta Shipwreck, Naikoon Provincial Park, Haida-Gwaii, British Columbia

DrFumblefinger ·
The glass floats tend to wash up on the west (windward) side of the Pacific. This hike was on the leeward (eastern) side, where these floats tend not to come. But there were a gazillion trees, like these.
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Re: Pesuta Shipwreck, Naikoon Provincial Park, Haida-Gwaii, British Columbia

Former Member ·
Like the tree pics. I picked up all of my glass floats a bit farther south - on the seaward side of Vancouver Island and on the western shore of the Olympic Peninsula. I think it was always in the summer. Maybe the tides and winds bring different material at different times of the year.
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Re: The Queen Charlotte Track

Travel Rob ·
An incredible hike Dan! Great descriptive piece and beautiful photos!
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Re: The Queen Charlotte Track

DrFumblefinger ·
What a great place for a hike! I envy you the experience. Beautiful photos BTW.
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Re: The Queen Charlotte Track

Samantha ·
Hi Dan, great post and amazing pictures. Would love to see this one day. Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Cunyan Crags and Dunmoor Hill, Northumberland

DrFumblefinger ·
Lovely fall scenery, Ian!
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

Travel Luver ·
Never been anywhere in Nevada except Vegas. Didn't know they had beautiful places like this. Can you get there from Vegas as a day trip? Was it hot?
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Well, for a start, make sure you visit Reno, Travel Luver. It's a much small town than Vegas but still has all the casinos, restaurants, etc that you'd expect from a Nevada City. From here it's easy to do a day trip to Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, or down to Carson City. Reno is actually the closest major city to Great Basin National Park, say about a 3-4 hour drive. Vegas is 6-7 hour drive away. Salt Lake City is closer to Great Basin than Vegas. But you really can't do it as...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PortMoresby ·
A friend who was a park planner for the National Park Service said his favorite park was Big Bend in Texas. He's a lover of desert landscapes, wide-open spaces and, in the case of this park too, almost no visitors. Another orphan, no doubt. http://www.nps.gov/bibe/index.htm
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the note, PortMoresby. I've visited a lot of the US parks, but Big Bend is still on my "to do" list. They do white water rafting trips there, which appeals to me. One of the things that a lot of folks enjoy about these "orphans" is that they are so sparsely peopled, with few tourists. I think the US Parks system is the USA's biggest tourist asset. I'm certainly a huge fan. Seems whenever I'm in a US Park, more German is spoken than English. The German folks certainly are aware of...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PHeymont ·
The comments on "orphan parks" made for some interesting thoughts. How do we (as a society) choose what to save for parks? When you consider urban parkland, the point is obvious: people who have no land of their own need areas for public recreation. In other cases, individuals with wealth and influence have created parks in areas important to them personally (think of Acadia and the Rockefellers, Palisades Interstate Park and Morgan partners). But setting aside and maintaining areas like...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PortMoresby ·
Pheymont, you speak as if budget cuts are in the future when in fact the Park Service has been functioning with less and less for years now. The Service has a mission to which they're dedicated but less funding has meant "deferred" maintenance on buildings, trails, you name it. And when features of a park are deemed unsafe or there isn't personnel to oversee visitors then parts are closed. I've experienced that myself recently when a trail I've visited in years past was closed. I have no...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Costs for the existing parks is mostly maintenance and salary. In the face of a broke federal government, I would favor increased user fees. $10-20 for a family to visit a national park for a week is the greatest bargain out there. People who love the parks would happily pay twice as much and I don't think the extra cost would be a deterent. Also, it's reasonable for those with concessions to pay up more than they are. They are given a monopoly and some of those profits should go back to the...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PHeymont ·
No, I'm painfully aware of the past and present cuts...but I see more ahead. My concern is that there are loud voices (my own included) to speak out against cuts to parks that have a big "fan base," including Gateway here in the NY area. Because so many speak out for those parks, I fear that NPS will increasingly "hide the damage" by even more drastic cuts to others--perhaps even outright abandonment. And that's not so far-fetched an idea. For some 20 or more years here in New York, Prospect...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I don't believe we disagree. I think the problem is that the park system relies on "federal handouts" and when a government is broke, there's less to hand out. As I said, I sort of favor them being self-funded by their user and concession fees. That's a lot of money already (if it was all kept in the parks) and people would be willing to pay more IF they knew the money stayed in the parks and didn't get diverted back into the Washington's general budget. Orphan parks would be...
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Re: Capital of Culture Series: Marseilles

Former Member ·
The pictures are so nice. We never thought that Marseilles looked like this. We thought it was a dreary port town. This makes us rethink any trips to the south of France. If we were to go hiking, how many days would be good there ? 2 ? 3 ? Thanks.
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Re: Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 9) Horton Plains

Former Member ·
It is hard to absorb all of this information. This truly is a land like no other. Thanks for telling us about Sri Lanka.
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Re: Where Gumbo Was #13. Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, British Columbia

Former Member ·
Hehe thank you for the praises i'm so proud Beautful mountains by the way
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Re: Where Gumbo Was #13. Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, British Columbia

Jonathan L ·
It is beautiful. I thought it was Lake Louise.
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Re: Where Gumbo Was #13. Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, British Columbia

DrFumblefinger ·
Similar, but different. Some photos of Lake Louise and the Plain of Six Glaciers hike, one of my favorites.
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Re: A Walk through Florida's Everglades: Big Cypress Bend boardwalk at Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park

Travel Rob ·
What a great walk.I really enjoy the boardwalks that are all over Florida.Really let's you get on top of some interesting things that you don't want to walk through.
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Re: A Walk through Florida's Everglades: Big Cypress Bend boardwalk at Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park

PHeymont ·
Looks like a great place for a walk and a learn! You might just be putting Florida on my map...
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Re: Sequoia National Park: Hiking to Pear Lake (The Lakes Trail)

PHeymont ·
You get closer each time to getting me into non-urban hiking...but how difficult is a hike like this for someone used to that kind of distance, but in (sometimes hilly) cities, but not to much off-path hiking?
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Re: Sequoia National Park: Hiking to Pear Lake (The Lakes Trail)

DrFumblefinger ·
The challenge of this particular trail is getting up to the lakes. Once there, the trail is not that hard, although rocky so you have to watch your footing. There are easier places to get into the subalpine zone of some great mountains, PHeymont. Both in California and in the Rockies. When you're ready, we'll pick one and head out there. Likely for a day hike. My knees don't like the weight of a full backpack anymore.
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Re: Sequoia National Park: Hiking to Pear Lake (The Lakes Trail)

PHeymont ·
My knees are part of my concern; they love walking (helps them!) but don't do well twisted or weighted. Have you any suggestions for the Hudson Valley/Lower Catskills area?
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Re: Sequoia National Park: Hiking to Pear Lake (The Lakes Trail)

DrFumblefinger ·
I've never hiked in the Catskills, though would like to some day. My suggestion: 1) Go to your local library. They definitely will have hiking books on areas of interest (or request them in advance so they can be delivered from other branches). Check out some trails that are convenient and look doable. Most hiking books give great details. 2) If you find a great book, it's worth buying to have as a reference at home and take with you on the trail. For example, though I haven't read it, this...
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Re: Sequoia National Park: Hiking to Pear Lake (The Lakes Trail)

GutterPup ·
Spectacular views and sequoia's - what more does one need?? A wonderful article that really brought to life this wonderful national park.
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Re: My Secret Place

DrFumblefinger ·
It is a beautiful place and I think you've got it right. Like you, I love to explore. Take my time, soak it all in, and capture what I can with my camera. Thanks for sharing this! And welcome to TravelGumbo!
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Re: Banff National Park: Hiking Johnson Lake

PHeymont ·
Fascinating to see that a hike in such rugged scenery can actually be an easy walk! There must be many more like that, that compare to a serious city walk and not to mountain-climbing. Good!
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Re: My Secret Place

MmGood ·
I want to do this hike with you! It's beautiful!!!!
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Re: Feb. 28, 2016: Torres del Paine – Trekking The "W“

Marilyn Jones ·
So gloriously beautiful!!!
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Re: Feb. 28, 2016: Torres del Paine – Trekking The "W“

Grand Escapades ·
Yes, Torres del Paine is definitely one of the most stunning National Parks of South America... A great place for photographers!
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Re: Feb. 28, 2016: Torres del Paine – Trekking The "W“

Ashley Ross ·
Really, Torres Del Paine one of the most famous national parks in the world, could become one of the best experiences in Chile. The famous W Trek in Torres Del Paine is the perfect destination for the adventurous traveller. I have almost finished 1 month trip in Chile with my family by the help of chiletourpatagonia.com . Really this place is so beautiful and attractive that was beyond my expectation. It was a memorable and adventures tour for us. It is a one of the best place for photographer.
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Re: Hiking Mt. Takao in Japan

HistoryDigger ·
I love Japan and hiking. This gives me a great place to go to escape the crush of Toyko on our next visit. Thanks for this. I didn't know about it when we lived in Japan.
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Re: May 23, 2016. Springtime Hike at Lake Minnewanka

Travel Rob ·
Its just spectacular!
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Re: East Beach Trail, Naikoon Provincial Park, Graham Island

Marilyn Jones ·
Wow; what a wonderful post! So interesting and your photos are creative and beautiful!!
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Re: East Beach Trail, Naikoon Provincial Park, Graham Island

Travel Rob ·
Incredible!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 12, 2014: Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

MsK ·
Wow, that would be something to see. Thank for sharing.
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Re: Yosemite National Park: A walk among Giants. Hiking in the Mariposa Grove

Dr.Y ·
Amazing! Next on the list! Thanks DrFumblefinger!
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Re: Yosemite National Park: A walk among Giants. Hiking in the Mariposa Grove

PHeymont ·
These days, I think of myself as a walker rather than a hiker—although I'm hard-put to really define the difference—but I love the accessible or easier walks you've been featuring...and one of these days, I really HAVE to get to Yosemite. Thanks!
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Re: Yosemite National Park: A walk among Giants. Hiking in the Mariposa Grove

Jessica Meddows ·
I'm so jealous you got to see deer! We were there a couple of weeks ago and the most wildlife we saw were some birds and adventurous squirrels. I was hoping for a bear or deer. Random question - I've been trying to find out the temperature of the water in Yosemite. Mirror Lake in particularly. You don't happen to know, do you? I went swimming in Mirror Lake and everyone looked at me like I'd spontaneously sprouted a second head.
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Re: Yosemite National Park: A walk among Giants. Hiking in the Mariposa Grove

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for all your comments. Followup: DrY. Yes, you and your family should see this sometime. You would love it! We need to plan out a trip to California for you that includes its best parks and some city sites. PHeymont. Yes, you must DO Yosemite. I recommend mid to late May as the best time to go as the waterfalls are brimming with meltwater. I like hikes of all types and can still do "moderate" hikes, though no longer take on "challenging" ones. But the Mariposa grove is doable by...
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Re: Takakkaw Falls, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Lestertheinvestor ·
I certainly remember these falls and this area with fond memories.
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Re: Takakkaw Falls, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

DrFumblefinger ·
LestertheInvestor -- If you look closely at the photo of the four shadows in the river, you may recognize one of them as yours!
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Re: Takakkaw Falls, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

GarryRF ·
Really good quality photos DrF. I love looking at frozen landscapes - on a screen ! Your words about reflection jogged my memory. Ever been walking through a store and see someone you think you recognise in the distance ? And as you get closer you realise its a mirror you're walking towards ! My wife says I need glasses - but its OK - I stop before I get into a conversation !
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Re: Visiting Western Greenland. Part II – Western Greenland on Foot!

DrFumblefinger ·
It's an amazing story, Huw, with beautiful photographs that really made me feel part of your travel experience. I love your sense of adventure. Thanks for sharing this special place with all of us! Are there any polar bears in Greenland? And if so, what precautions would a hiker take. One last question. How heavy was your backpack when you started this journey. The weight of food alone must have been substantial.
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Re: Visiting Western Greenland. Part II – Western Greenland on Foot!

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the detailed info, Huw. I find it interesting and helpful. One last question. Do you use trekking poles when you hike/backpack?
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Re: Visiting Western Greenland. Part II – Western Greenland on Foot!

Racing_snake ·
Hi, yes I do. Very handy for crossing rivers with a big pack and they certainly take a bit of a load off your legs. I find I quickly get into my rhythm and can then keep my steady pace going. I would definitely recommend them. One unusual use for them last year was to fend off a deranged arctic fox that came into 'goose camp' 8 times and was trying to bite team members. I have video to edit and stills to post yet! Looks a little comical as it was little bigger than a domestic cat but serious...
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Re: Visiting Western Greenland. Part II – Western Greenland on Foot!

Filip H.A. Claeys ·
I have no concrete plans (yet), but may be interested to hike the ACT with some off-trail extensions here and there. Do you think it is worth-while to take a packraft? There's of course the extra weight to consider, but on the other hand a packraft opens additional possibilities and adds excitement. Do you have any suggestions about areas off the trail that are particularly nice or interesting? Thanks.
 
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