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Tagged With "Tacoma Power Plant"

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Re: Casa Bacardi Rum Plant, San Juan, Puerto Rico

DrFumblefinger ·
I've visited the Bacardi plant too, and remember being quite impressed by it. As I recall, the original was in Cuba and the family moved to P.R. to escape Castro. And I'm proud to see you standing after those free samples! Thanks for the post.
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Re: January 20, 2020: Newport Beach, California

PHeymont ·
Always a puzzle, Garry, when looking at restaurant reviews, because not everyone values the same thing, and not everyone is health-conscious, even if they say so! And it's not just portion size, either: even in more sensible portions there can be a lot of unhealthy extra calories, food that isn't fresh, etc. And with the arrival of plant-based 'meat,' I find myself amazed at how many people who rail against processed food are pleased to eat this incredibly-processed 'food' because it is...
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Re: Norwegian bank is out of cash, on purpose

HistoryDigger ·
Although I don't use cash every day, I sure want it when I need it. After living through Hurricane Katrina and the LONG power outage of the aftermath, I recognize when cash is crucial. And yes, DrFumblefinger poses a good question about the lack of cash during cyber warfare, which goes on regularly even if we choose to ignore it. Maybe we should go back to bartering for everything. But most of us have lost the art.
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Re: Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington (Where Gumbo was #285)

Neil McAleer ·
Beautiful, Lester! Esp. 6, 8, and 10c. A "MUST" destination for me now. How are you after all these years? Best wishes to all! Neil
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Re: Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington (Where Gumbo was #285)

DrFumblefinger ·
Terrific destination and a wonderful puzzle. Enjoyed this one.
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Re: Carrick-a-Rede and the Rope Bridge

Amateuremigrant ·
It's good that if you want to get the the best places you have to use your own motive power, and a little bit of nerve, too !
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Re: Belfast: An Uneasy City

PHeymont ·
I think I have to disagree on comparing human societies to plate tectonics; over the latter we have no control, but I would hate to ever think we've exhausted the possibility of dealing with the former. Examining mass religious conflicts generally reveals other issues beneath. That's certainly true of the long and tortured history between the two islands and the two Irelands. While James was a Catholic and William a Protestant, the real issues behind the conflict that set Ireland's future...
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Re: Gallery: Transport, Rural South China

PHeymont ·
What an amazing variety! I like to look around in Europe for "oddballs" like small pedal-powered trucks and other small delivery vehicles, but these take the cake. I'm especially fascinated by the front-wheel drive truck that appears to be friction-driven (power applied to the surface of the tire, rather than to the axle).
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? # 8.8

PortMoresby ·
Or California. The plants in the foreground are interesting too. The tall shrubs/short trees are similar to joshua trees, a desert plant, while the white flowers are, I believe, hydrangeas, which do best in a moist climate. Altogether, with the conservatory, I'm reminded of England, maybe Cornwall, which is referred to as having a sub-tropical climate. Which, of course, means it could indeed be Australia.
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Re: It's not snow: silvery cholla cactus, backlit, Christmas Day in Green Valley, AZ

PortMoresby ·
On a hike once, far from the nearest facilities...well, you get the picture. The trouble with nettles is, unlike cholla, the inflictors of the stings are small and not noticeable if one isn't familiar with the plant. Despite the painful meeting of nether parts with plant parts, it took another encounter or 2 before I finally got that those innocuous-looking plants were the ones. Cholla, with which I'm also personally familiar, cannot hold a candle in the pain department to nettles.
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Mac ·
It's a nightmare! A fair chunk of my packing now includes various chargers, connection cables and mains power adaptors for phones, iPads, Kindles. cameras.... Oh, plus a universal backup power supply battery (RAVPOWER - good value) in case I cannot get to a mains socket - just to keep in touch! I have to say that the Euro proposal to have ONE single charger for all devices has some merit!! PS - watch out that chargers that are sold as suitable for iPhones are often not powerful enough to...
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Mac ·
The RAVPOWER unit that I went for is shown on the following link (a real mouthful): http://www.ravpower.com/ravpow...hite-us-version.html This model has enough power to fully recharge an iPad! Currently available from Amazon for USD 36.00 They also do more powerful packs. (Hope this doesn't cut across any "No Advertising" policies
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

PHeymont ·
In the Duel of the Devices, I'm going to declare the RAVPower unit the winner. Both of these devices are essentially external batteries, something that's becoming more popular as more phones come with non-removable batteries. There are two critical differences, however: capacity and output. The PowerStick has a capacity of 750mAh (about half the power held by an average cellphone battery) and a maximum output current of 700mA (phone chargers usually supply 1000mA). The RAVpower device has a...
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Re: Share Your Budget Tablet and Laptop Picks

Hank ·
I have a high power PC for my hardcore work, but for getting around I like the Google Nexus 7. Nice tablet, slick, fast, less than $200 bucks. Great for using when you fly.
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Re: Share Your Budget Tablet and Laptop Picks

DrFumblefinger ·
If you want something a little larger and with a keyboard and good computing power, there's a new bunch of chromebooks coming out for the holiday season. PC World recently featured one in the $200 price range, weighing on 1.25 kg. Here's that link.
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Re: Charging your mobile devices on the go

PHeymont ·
That article has good advice...but should have noted one thing more: Not all USB ports on planes and trains carry power for devices (including chargers). Some are data links only; if you don't know about a particular plane or airline, check or don't count on it!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Mar. 20, 2014: Spring - at last!

Travel Rob ·
It beats the locks on a bridge that they have to cut off,that's for sure. I've seen people plant long living trees and always thought that was a nice idea too
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Re: Italy: Giant tour bus, tiny street

Amateuremigrant ·
Yay ! One up for bus drivers ! I drove a 10m DAF bus 20 times from Oslo to North Cape and back. One place in the Lofotens required me to reverse down a winding dirt track with rock on one side and sea on the other with about 2ft of clearance on either side. Thank the lord for power steering and BIG mirrors. Bus drivers deserve all the tips they get !
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Re: All Aboard the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad

DrFumblefinger ·
Great trip through some remarkable scenery! Likely as much fun as it seems to be!
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Re: All Aboard the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad

PHeymont ·
One of my biggest regrets of my Colorado road trip of a few years ago was deciding we didn't have time for the Durango and Silverton...and you just reminded me why I regret it! Great story!
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Re: Finding Reiner #7: Shrapnel & Bones

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by Carlin Scherer: Beautiful image - grabbing on to the spider web and flying into a peaceful land/world. Reiner wrote beautifully!!! Reiner was a great writer, and I'm sure in the original German it's even more elegantly phrased than in this fine translation! PHeymont -- agree with the sentiment. Believe we'll always have evil, power grabbing tyrants in our midst and our challenge is not to keep them from seizing power. Not an easy task. I've been reading Eric Metaxas...
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Re: Charleston's Grand Mansions: Middleton Place

PHeymont ·
I was interested to note (aside from the alligators!) the fact that the house at Middleton was never restored after the Civil War. I noted that at Magnolia plantation, not far away, a small cottage was moved in to replace the original house...and it left me wondering. While the planter class certainly reclaimed power after Reconstruction, they must have taken quite a while to overcome the economic damage they brought on themselves.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day: June 19, 2014: Seville Oranges

DrFumblefinger ·
Seville oranges remind me more of lemons than usual oranges in that they attack your taste buds. You'd have thought the folks would have learned to plant mandarin or naval or valencia oranges!?
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 18th, 2014: Bears

DrFumblefinger ·
The black bears in Yosemite NP are among the most aggressive and clever in the world. They've been known to pull down a locked closed car door to get at a picnic hamper or cooler in the back seat. They are amazingly strong -- imagine the power needed to peel a locked steel car door off its hinges. And they share this knowledge from generation to generation! Once a bear has eaten human feed, they are "spoiled" forever and often become more aggressive in their hunt for food and may even need...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#115)

DrFumblefinger ·
Death Valley looks like it's teaming with plant life compared to our puzzle photo. More clues to follow. And don't be shy about guessing.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#115)

HistoryDigger ·
My first thought was New Mexico, but even the roads I've traveled there have more plant life. Hmmm?
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Re: Airplane window to power USB charger?

DrFumblefinger ·
These are exactly the kind of innovations that can change energy production in a society. Imagine houses covered by the same film. Likely could capture enough power to generate a home. It's an exciting development.
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Re: June 16th, 2016- Love Them or Hate Them- Brussels Sprouts

DrFumblefinger ·
Interesting plant. I'm not sure I've ever seen them growing like this before either. I also have a love and hate relationship with the brussel sprout -- rarely I enjoy them. More than rarely I dislike them.
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

PHeymont ·
A little further research confirms what I thought: at least in the Toyota and Ford hybrids, the gasoline engine powers a generator/charger while in use. That's in addition to the power captured from braking.
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Re: Guide to Greek Holidays, Summer 2015-style

DrFumblefinger ·
That's all good information, PHeymont, thanks. No one knows how the Greek people will react to this, but there is a possibility of riots and demonstrations. Perhaps violence -- there is no way of predicting. The crisis will have a major impact on the Greek quality of life. I've heard some estimates that if Greece makes a new currency, it will have only a fraction of the buying power of the Euro, perhaps 25 cents on the Euro. That will obviously not be at all well received but its much too...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#112)

Goni ·
That type of plant grows in places with regular bush fires, right?
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#112)

PortMoresby ·
The plant in question is a yucca, I believe, and grows, as DrF says, all over the SW US, including the Sonora Desert that extends into Northern Mexico. But the one in the background of the flower is, if I'm not mistaken, a Joshua Tree and that may narrow down the location, maybe in the Mojave Desert. Or maybe not. Having lived for decades in the Sonora Desert near Mexico, brush fires are uncommon so maybe that fact alone, mentioned by The Puzzler, will help pin it down.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#112)

Goni ·
I've seen a much smaller version of this plant in Australia but can't recall right now where it was. Are we in Australia (then I might have to go search my photos for the small version of the plant)?
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Re: Brooklyn's Spectacular Botanic Garden (Where Gumbo Was #112)

PHeymont ·
An update to the blog! We returned to the Garden, today a week and some later, for the giant plant sale that's a Brooklyn spring institution and were rewarded with a different view of the Cherry Esplanade, now in full blossom. Here are a few views... For pictures of the plant sale, click HERE
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? (#119)

Jill's Scene ·
There are long walks and then there are looooong walks. If it's a looooong walk I might know where you are, Travel Gumbo. Because I reckon I know the name of this shrub - it's a popular garden plant in my part of the world.
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Re: Boeing ramps up 737, cuts back 747, 777

DrFumblefinger ·
I presume the reduced 777 and 747 production at the Everett plant will be taken up with new 787 production.
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Re: An English Garden Gallery: Hidcote

PortMoresby ·
Yes, a common plant with an uncommon coloring. I'm partial to the fern.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 7, 2013: Bicycle taxi, Santa Clara, Cuba.

GarryRF ·
... and of course - The One Horse Power SUV !
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Re: Classic American Cars #3

GarryRF ·
No Dave. I've had it since new and it gets a very easy life ! Still only done 24,000 miles. Its has an Aluminum body and is very lightweight. So even the low HP has an amazing power to weight ratio. Red line on RPM is around 11,000 rpm and it flies up to 89mph. Which is where the Maximum speed is electronically governed. The metal roof fits into the trunk in 3 sections and the rear window drops down too.
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Re: Name Your Favorite Restaurants for Atmosphere, Past or Present

DrFumblefinger ·
That sounds like a great meal, PortMoresby! Thanks for sharing with us. I'm curious about the fern dish. Were they the young coiled ferns just budding from the ground (known as "fiddleheads" in eastern Canada), or were they the more mature plant? It's pretty rare for a restaurant to serve fern in my experience.
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Re: Hotel-Malls; Shop 'til You Drop

DrFumblefinger ·
It's hard for me to imagine liking shopping that much. To the point I can't leave the mall and have dinner and a night's sleep somewhere else. But to each his own. It must meet a consumer demand in that market, so more power to them!
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 3) cars from the USA and UK

rbciao ·
Great pics of great cars. I will put the Tampa Bay Museum on my list of things to see. Additionally, The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky is awesome, as well. It includes a 50's diner cafe featuring period stuff for lunch. Less than a mile away is the Corvette assembly plant, which offers tours. This is the only place in the whole wide world where Corvettes are assembled. Both are definitely worth a visit. The National Packard Museum is located In Warren, Oh and is small, but...
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 3) cars from the USA and UK

rbciao ·
The National Corvette Museum and the nearby GM assembly plant are located in Bowling Green, Ky. and both venues are really worth a visit. The museum is just off of I-65 at exit 28, so it is easy to find. Plus, there are signs on the interstate in both directions making it well marked. We saw the signs when we were southbound on our way to Louisiana and decided to stop on our way home. We figured an hour in each location and we spent over two hours in each. We could have spent many, many...
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Re: The Big Island of Hawaii (Part 1). Volcanoes Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, PHeymont. It's a great destination partially because the tourist industry can't control it. The volcano will do what it wants and as the flow of lava over the road reminds us, we have little power to stop it.
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Re: Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Redux

GarryRF ·
A reminder of the destructive power of nature. I'd be worried about the soles of my shoes melting and welding themselves to rock ! Is the access a tourist has only to dormant areas ? Fascinating blog from what must be the most "lively" location on Earth. Once again DrF , educational and interesting !
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Re: Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Redux

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Garry, and thanks for your comment. The active areas within the National Park are off limits because of toxic fume levels, not so much because of lava. The roads to the Pahoe area (outside the park) of actively flowing lava are closed and access is theoretically restricted. For a fee, one of the locals will guide you to the flowing lava. Remember this is thick fairly slowly flowing lava, not unlike moving pancake batter. But it is hot and you have to be careful. Shoes can melt and worse...
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Re: Gold Country California: Malakoff Diggins, Ranger Connie in Charge

DrFumblefinger ·
It does seem a fascinating place! Enjoyed your very lovely historic photos and narrative. I suspect we've all meet a "Ranger Connie" in our lives. Sometimes a little power backfires. I'll need to visit this part of California sometime. What is the altitude of this area? Suppose fall and spring are the best times to visit?
 
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