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Tagged With "Heritage Park"

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Re: Huntingdon, Pennsylvania: Peaceful Holiday Getaway

George G. ·
Nicely done Stephanie ! The Swigart Car Museum was on my list for a future travel blog since I travel Route 22 but go east from I-99 to my brothers' residences in Punxsutawney and Parker, PA. I always seemed to be short on time to take the detour to go west on Route 22. Your Swigart photos whetted my appetite to now take that detour and visit that place. Loved the automobile photos and the stories behind some of them.
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Re: Huntingdon, Pennsylvania: Peaceful Holiday Getaway

Stephanie Kalina-Metzger ·
Thank you George. They close in the winter, so call first to be sure so that it's not a wasted trip.
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Re: Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Jonathan L ·
Thanks. this article brings back memories of my visit in 2005. The tour led by the Park Ranger was fascinating and very even handed. I had a great time.
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Re: March 3, 2020: St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands

George G. ·
Booked a wedding anniversary trip to St. Thomas and we had a fabulous romantic time. If you get the chance, take the Red Hook ferry to Cruz Bay at St. John's and explore the Virgin Island National Park. Lots of plantation ruins from back in the day when Denmark ruled the Virgin Islands. We had a wonderful lunch and view from the Caneel Bay Resort, which I understand has not reopened after being pummeled by two hurricanes.
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Re: Sea World gives up its killer whale shows

DrFumblefinger ·
I grow weary of political correctness. Orcas are highly intelligent animals, no doubt -- and have the "cruelty" we expect of intelligent animals (anyone who's seen them hunt a baby gray whale for hours, only to kill it, eat its tongue and let the rest go to waste knows what I mean). I never saw Blackfish, but I do recall at the old Marineland park in Southern California. The park was closed for a number of months, and the orcas got depressed. Listless, didn't eat, didn't look good. Someone...
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Re: Wonders of the Modern World

DrFumblefinger ·
The Soviets have never been completely transparent about Chernobyl, but this is the story as best as I was able to synthesize it: It seems that the alarm system was malfunctioning (going off all the time) so it was turned off by the tech monitoring the system. He had the fuel rods pulled out of their cooling chambers for maintenance work, was distracted (remember, the alarms are off), then by the time he focused back on the task at hand the rods had begun to melt and couldn't be reinserted...
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Re: St Stephen's Green, Dublin. (Where Gumbo was #137)

PHeymont ·
I have to admit that the first clue reminded me, in succession, of a spot in Parc des Buttes-Chaumont in Paris, of Prospect Park in Brooklyn and of Frogness Park in Oslo...it was only when the clues got more specific that I could rule them out, and only when the Fusiliers Arch appeared and I could search its text that I could find the answer. That arch, by the way, provoked a lot of controversy when erected in 1907; it memorializes a regiment in England's colonial war against the Dutch Boers...
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Re: Exploring Willemstad, Curacao’s UNESCO World Heritage Site

DrFumblefinger ·
Great piece and fabulous destination. I can almost feel the heat and humidity from your photos!
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Re: Exploring Willemstad, Curacao’s UNESCO World Heritage Site

PortMoresby ·
It was a long time ago and warm, yes, but I seem to remember Curacao being dry, think goats & tumbleweeds.
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Re: Whitby - North Yorkshire Coastal Town

Marilyn Jones ·
I haven't been to Whitby in years...thank yu for the memories!
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Re: Whitby - North Yorkshire Coastal Town

Amateuremigrant ·
Camping on the pig farm beyond the abbey in the sixties �� But loved it. A fine wee nugget of a port town that never seems to lose its charm - there's no room, unlike sprawling cousins of Scarboro, Brid and Filey
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Re: New book celebrates Yellowstone, National Parks Centennial

DrFumblefinger ·
That looks like a must read book about my favorite US National Park! Thanks for bringing it to our attention.
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Re: Visiting My Backyard—Riverside Park

Travel Rob ·
Glad kids are still using the park. I also think I going to parks is an important part of growing up and in most cases very safe. A few years ago FBI statistics showed crime was at a 40 year low in a lot places in the US, but perception was crime was the highest its ever been. The rates might of gone higher a bit in the last few years but crime is still at historic lows.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

PortMoresby ·
DrF, I'm guessing the answer is a straightforward geologic issue, but can you tell me what determines whether the hills are part of, or alternatively simply adjoin, the mountains? All VERY interesting!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
I believe it is an issue of the mountains' origins. A range has a common origin from a common fault line. The Rockies are a fairly new range, and the Porcupines have been around longer and are much more eroded. But I'm not a geologist, PM. I just look at them and think it's all beautiful!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

PortMoresby ·
A good answer - scientifically & emotionally! Thanks again.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

Jonathan L ·
I loved Head Samshed In when I visited it. Definitely a must see if you get to that part of the world. If you do also go to the Frank Slide site. A massive land-slide took placein the 1920's (I think). i will find one of my photos.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, Jonathan. The Frank Slide is in the Crowsnest Pass area and it's very interesting to see. Beautiful valley as well with a lot of mining history
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Re: See Them While You Can: 10 Wins for Historic Preservation

PortMoresby ·
Note that the National Trust for Historic Preservation is a private organization. I think that's key in this era of government cutbacks and a congress unable to accomplish anything to speak of. If the National Park Service is unable to maintain it's infrastructure then one can only imagine how little care might go into preserving bits of our cultural heritage lacking big names, such as those on the list above. Commercial interests also have a place in accomplishing what government and...
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Re: World's scariest hiking trail?

Dr.Y ·
To be precise, the Hua Shan trial has two sections. The longer scarier section with local advise to be done during night is now equipped with Gondola. Only the hard core climber will try that section now. There are park ranger standing by the entrance to screen if some one is really fit for the climb (after seeing the trial in person, i realized that the screen is not just for increasing the Gondola revenue! ). Not be too relaxed yet, even after the Gondola ride, to reach the tea house, one...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

Travel Rob ·
Thanks ,it truly is a highlight of any trip to the area.I loved the Location and setting of the house.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PHeymont ·
Jefferson has always been a fascinating and difficult character, with many sides to his life and work. Aside from the Monticello and other designs, he was also a pioneer agriculturalist, importing many varieties of flowers and vegetables, and improving them by breeding. But for me, the hardest task, mentally and emotionally, is to reconcile the brilliant political and philosophical words with an absolute refusal to even question the institution of slavery, when many others of his time in...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I never try to judge historic figures through the prism of modern values. Remember in the 18th century slavery was a global institution -- absolutely every country in the world had slaves. And being from Virginia, he knew the southern states wouldn't join northern colonies in forming a new country without slavery being allowed, so I don't think he thought it was time to fight that fight. I think he valued the formation of the new country above all else -- risking his life to do so...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PHeymont ·
I would agree that presentism is a real danger for historians...but without wanting to veer this discussion too far off course, you'll note that I cited two of his close colleagues and acquaintances in Virginia alone, not to mention Lafayette and many others IN HIS TIME AND ACQUAINTANCE who had already concluded that it was time, and many others were acting on it. It was an active debate in his time and place, he was aware of it, and sadly...he took the wrong side.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
I agree his side was not the right one, PHeymont, but I also believe of greatest importance for him was forming the new country. I don't think we'll ever know his personal feelings about slavery because he didn't write about them.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PortMoresby ·
I believe you can tell a great deal about someone from what they leave behind. On a visit to Monticello I was struck by the design of the house and the distinct sensibility it indicated regarding the creative mind of it's designer. I bought a sundial in the gift shop and am reminded of the man every time I look at it.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PortMoresby ·
Regarding his feeling about slavery, I have no doubt, because of the nature of the man as shown by the things he did write, he was conflicted. And while he seems never to have come to a personal solution I don't believe, either, that his lack of action was de facto support for the institution. Sometimes there just isn't time to resolve one's own conflicts and be a father of a new nation too. We may be asking too much of human beings if we expect tidy packages and complete resolutions in 1 ...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

Hank ·
I visited Monticello as a kid and enjoyed the views. I need to go back now and look at the architecture here and especially at the U of V in more detail. My favorite John Kennedy quote (to his staff at a dinner in the White HOuse) I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered at the White House - with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone. Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quo...#G4wQ5S4SazWSs0dq.99
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Re: Everglades raccoon

TravelandNature ·
The snake is doing the job that he was designed to do. Unfortunately, he is doing so far from his native habitat and finds the native south Florida species easy prey. This python is in the park as the result of accidental or intentional release. Yes, people take their hungry, unwanted pets to the park. The National Park Service is working hard to try to manage the situation. h ttp://www.nps.gov/ever/naturescience/burmesepythonsintro.htm
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Re: Everglades raccoon

DrFumblefinger ·
The park rangers have told me that (unofficially) they have given up all hope of eradicating the Burmese python from the ecosystem. They're here to stay.
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Re: Everglades raccoon

TravelandNature ·
Invasive species cause havoc not just with cute native species, but also agriculture, people's health and livelihoods. The Park Service has a number of interesting management programs, including a parntership with Florida Fish and Wildlife. Fish and Wildlife has a Pet Amnesty Program so that people can rehome unwanted exotic pets, rather than thoughtlessly placing them in the wild. The exotic animals are offered to adopters, who are given instructions on proper care. Fish and Wildlife offers...
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Re: Where Gumbo Was, #6: The Japanese Covered Bridge, Hoi An, Vietnam

Travel Rob ·
A great Where in the World is Gumbo Pic this week by Port Moresby . I couldn't believe anyone would get it. Hats off to Club2013 for nailing it!
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Re: Where Gumbo Was, #6: The Japanese Covered Bridge, Hoi An, Vietnam

JohnT ·
Thanks for this. I'm learning more bout a part of the world I've never been.
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Re: Where Gumbo Was, #6: The Japanese Covered Bridge, Hoi An, Vietnam

PortMoresby ·
JohnT, over the years Asia has become more & more a favorite part of the planet for me to wander and hang out. I think the reason may be, in part, because it's much more in a state of flux than, say, Europe and as a result has more to offer someone who likes a bit of edge to their travels. I fear Europe has become somewhat more of the same wherever I go these days while Asia offers more of what I seem to need. Not to say there aren't parts of Europe to which I still enjoy returning. But...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? 7.5

WorkerBee ·
Originally Posted by PortMoresby: It seems to be "Leopold", a symbolic 1890's photographer, by David Clemons, Higgins Point, Lake Coeur d'Alene in northern Idaho. Well done Port Moresby. However there is a minor point about the location. Higgens Point (yes, this is the correct spelling) is about 0.2 mile southeast of the location of the statue. The statue is actually located on the 34 acre Coeur d'Alene Parkway, a thin strip of park land running along the Centennial Trail for about 1/2 mile...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #33

Andre Pur ·
I don't have a clue... it's a national park?
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

PHeymont ·
It's interesting how we perceive age. In the U.S., we have few buildings over 200 years old, while in other places buildings older than that are part of the housing stock. And here we have a building of intricate design and decoration old enough that we hardly know any of the history of its builders. A reminder to us how much there is to see and know that is beyond our daily lives. Thank you for the tour!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
Perceptions of time ! Interesting subject. You do get a little blasé about History when you're surrounded by it. This is my local Church. It's nearly a thousand years old and still in regular use !
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Age is relative, isn't it? I guess they called it the "New World" for a reason. That's a beautiful church, Garry, and in such a lovely setting. Maybe you can share more about it with us sometime in a POD or short blog post.
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
TravelandNature. You'd be surprised at how many people have been saved by that Church. "Regulars" from hundreds of years ago still attend services and Funerals. Next door to this Church is a Pub and folks come out to catch the last Bus at Mid-night. They often see 8 Nuns in white carrying a coffin through the main doors. Which are still closed - of course!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

Travel Rob ·
GarryRF was kind enough to take me to that church It's impressive. People just walk old walls too there like it's no big deal. I guess it's really what you're used to
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
Walking the "Walls" that enclose the City - maybe 3 miles around - is a local ritual ! At frequent intervals there are Pubs to stop at. The idea being that you stop at each one , have a drink and proceed to the next. Its only the hardened drinkers who complete the circuit. A friend from Anna Maria Island, Florida sent his daughter to stay with us for a while. Same age as my daughter and they got along like a house on fire ! So when we arrived in Chester I told her our day was walking around...
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
On my first visit to Anna Maria I was amazed that the Pelicans would sit next to you on the pier by Allemande Villas. Like a pet dog. They would try and steal your bait as you were fishing. But like a good dog they responded to a "Hey you!" and sat watching you. When I caught my first fish I pulled and fought with the monster! As I lifted my prize from the water my new Pelican friend flexed his wings. He glided off the Pier and with great precision removed my catch from the hook! He passed...
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Re: Ottawa – NOT the coldest Capital in the world!

Todd ·
Nice article, but have to point out that the "Capitol" is a building in Washington DC while Ottawa (and Washington DC itself for that matter) are the "capitals" of their countries. One letter, but very different meanings.
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Re: Ottawa – NOT the coldest Capital in the world!

DrFumblefinger ·
So noted, Todd!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
For those who are interested, we received this link which has some interesting graphics of Newgrange site. http://www.openuniversity.edu/...he-winter-solstice-a
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Re: La Dolce Vita (Part 5) Venezia (Venice)

PHeymont ·
Great pictures...makes me want to go back! Interesting to note: the Mayor of Venice has been very active lately in trying to get the large cruise ships re-routed to keep them out of the fragile space between San Marco and Guidecca...and last month hundreds of people swam out to try to block the ships!
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Re: La Dolce Vita (Part 5) Venezia (Venice)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for your comments, PHeymont. The cruise ships are BIG business in Venice, and certainly allow a lot of people to enjoy the destination if only for a day. But there are easily places the ships could park that wouldn't hurt the delicate lagoon, then shuttle people into the city.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 8, 2013 : The Sanctuary Knocker, Durham Cathedral, a World Heritage site

DrFumblefinger ·
It's an impressive image, Mac, made all the more interesting by the story behind it. One sometimes forgets the role the church played in "forgiveness" acts through the centuries. I'm always astounded at the quality of craftsmanship behind these thousand year old items. In many ways, we've lost ground, not improved on their skills. Thanks for the education, and sharing this photo!
 
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