Tagged With "city"

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Re: Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

Former Member ·
This is spectacular. A good example of one of those places that is just sitting there, not really getting a lot of attention from US travelers.
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Re: Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the note, Chatterbot2. Yes, Quebec is relatively under-touristed, especially when compared to Europe. If you want to visit a 400 year old European stype fortress, don't want to fly across the Atlantic, want to go to place where French is the dominant language, want great food and friendly folks, then Quebec City should be at the top of your travel list.
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Re: Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

Former Member ·
The Quebecois were very amused at my attempts to speak French. It is always great to see people laugh.
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Re: Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

DrFumblefinger ·
They may laugh, Chatterbot2, but I can tell you with absolute certainty that your fumbling attempts to speak their language melted their hearts. You were a valued guest, if not one of them, after trying.
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Re: Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

Former Member ·
Monsieur, vous êtes très gentil de le dire. I do try to make a stab at the local language wherever I travel. Around the world, people are amazingly patient with my mangling of their language. It does create good entertainment. Almost always, my puzzled efforts put people at ease. They are instantly willing to help "the poor confused thing".
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Re: Bratislava: An overlooked travel destination

Former Member ·
Thanks for the great pics! I've only ever seen Bratislava from the river while on a Budapest to Vienna ferry...but now you've put it on the menu for our next time in Vienna. Worth noting: since Ryanair flights to "Vienna" actually land at Bratislava, it's a good opportunity for budget flyers to pay a visit before or after their time in Vienna.
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Re: Bratislava: An overlooked travel destination

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, Ready2Go! I didn't know about Ryanair landing there. Bratislava has the benefit of being much cheaper than Vienna, so if you want to spend time in the region, your budget will go much further here than in Austria. Also, it's much less heavily touristed, and in some of the side streets you'll feel like you've got the place to yourself.
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

Dgems ·
Love your discription of Nevada City.......living close by but not in it!
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

DrFumblefinger ·
A charming place, PortMoresby! I can easily see spending a day wandering the streets here. But I've never heard of a bridge formally called "scary high bridge" before?!?
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PHeymont ·
When you open your curtains and find tourists with cameras looking back at you, it’s time to go. It's that old ironic feeling, no? Some days you're the windshield, some days the bug! I've often been plagued with the feeling that I'm who I'm complaining about...
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PortMoresby ·
Thank you Djems, I love that you love it. DrF, it needed a name. And for a similar reason, you'll see no pictures inside the shaft of the Empire Mine next week. Indeed, P., and why you see more pictures of mine without people than with, empathy.
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PortMoresby ·
I LOVE when this happens! In the midst of my series on the Gold Rush towns in California and coinciding with our discussions of early photography in 'Gumbo's World' on the homepage, I read this morning of an exhibit of photographs at Stanford University. From the gallery site: "...Carleton Watkins (1829–1916) ventured west in 1849 to strike it rich. But instead of prospecting for gold, Watkins developed a talent for photography—a medium invented only 22 years before." Read more here . I will...
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PHeymont ·
My turn to be jealous that you'll get to see the exhibit. The images look wonderful, but what is sticking in my mind is that Watkins was traveling primitive roads and trails with...omg...18 x 22 glass plates. One stumble, and...
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PortMoresby ·
It reminds me that the thing, technology, that we think is making us great, is setting us up for extinction. That effort, compared to digital, what wimps we are. Including me, from my Rollei SLX to the camera I use for pictures here, the size of a pack of cigarettes. I'd be in much better shape if I hadn't put down the Rollei.
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PHeymont ·
Yes, but I suspect that my two digitals may be smarter than I was at calculating exposures...
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Re: Gold Country, California: Nevada City

PortMoresby ·
And which may prove the premise.
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Re: May 29, 2016 - Grants Tomb

Travel Rob ·
Those are great photos Jonathan! Another place I want to get to!
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Re: 'Uncomfortable memory' tour faces Barcelona slave history

DrFumblefinger ·
It is good that a people face up to and learn from the past. We must learn from the lessons of history, but I do hope this will not become a "self-flagellation" exercise. At the end of the 18th century, everyone had slaves. Every people, every race, every culture, every country participated in the buying, selling and owning of other people. It was the norm. Fortunately, with a few rare exceptions, modern society has become enlightened and the rights of individuals is now a central focus of...
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Re: 'Uncomfortable memory' tour faces Barcelona slave history

PHeymont ·
'Presentism' is always a danger for historians, but in this case, there's a real issue of interest based on the late-in-the-day entry into slave-owning by the later Catalan grandees; they went into it when all European countries had already abolished it, and when it had been abolished in many colonial areas. Sadly, not Cuba, Brazil, or, at the beginning of that period, the United States. One of the reasons it's important to consider these past things is because they do enter into the...
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Re: 'Uncomfortable memory' tour faces Barcelona slave history

GarryRF ·
Slavery is just part of a long cruel history. Wherever there is chance to make money, people of any race or creed will gladly join in. Even the African warlords who sold the "prisoners" to the slave ships played their parts in this piece of history. Even today fortunes are made by sending young men to die in the name of "Defence". Money has no morals.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 25, 2014: Nail Art, Toronto, Canada

PHeymont ·
The nail sculpture, and especially the last picture, remind me a bit of El Anatsui's work, a visual fabric composed of commonplace elements. Fabulous! I did a little looking, and was able to find the artist, David Partridge. The work is called Metropolis, and uses more than 100,000 nails. If you drop a coin into it at the top, apparently, the coin will find a path to the bottom, making random music as it goes! Here's some more about it
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Re: San Juan's El Morro: Layers of Stone, Layers of History (Where Gumbo Was, #84)

PHeymont ·
A missing bit: El Morro and the historic site as a whole is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but while I included that in the Tags and Collections for the blog, I forgot to mention it in the text! My apologies...
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

IslandMan ·
very colorful collection of pictures Dr F.....thanks
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, Islandman! Canada has a reputation for being "clean", generally true. As you can see from the gallery, even the "smutty" places are very clean-looking.
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

NonstopFromJFK ·
Being compared to NY is always a good thing! But I am biased. =P I do want to go to Toronto sometime, I've been there as a kid but I would like to actually explore the city as an adult.
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for stopping by, Nonstop! And welcome to TravelGumbo. I know you'd love to visit Toronto. It's actually just a LONG day's drive from NYC , and there's lots to see and do. I'd combine it with a visit to the Niagara peninsula and you'd have a lovely time.
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

GarryRF ·
Enjoyable walk around Toronto DrF. Love your "Victorian" attitude to some stores as "smutty" Looks like a very enjoyable city and worth visiting. I fear that all my relatives would discover my plans if I went. I would spend most of the week drinking tea and hearing stories of Aunty Ethel's bad leg. Oh ...and the twins....let me get the photo album...
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

rbciao ·
Nice selection of pics and thanks for the post. Toronto is truly a great Canadian city. We are hoping to spend a long weekend there at the end of February or beginning of March. Your comment concerning the smutty being clean is a cogent observation.
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Toronto -- the City at Large

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for your comments, Garry and Rbcia! Garry, you mentioned twins!? Are you a grandpa again? Rbciao, if you can postpone your trip to spring, when everything is blooming, I think you'll have an even better time in Toronto. But there's lots to see and do, even in the winter.
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Re: San Juan's El Morro: Layers of Stone, Layers of History (Where Gumbo Was, #84)

HistoryDigger ·
Fascinating history. Stunning photos. Thanks.
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Re: Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

PHeymont ·
It's hard for me to imagine the short arc of Dawson's heyday. In 1902 some of the most important buildings were going up, obviously reflecting a future of growth and wealth—and yet, within the same year, the population shrank to an eighth of what it had been only a year or two earlier!
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Re: Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

DrFumblefinger ·
That's the nature of gold boom towns, PHeymont. I believe another gold vein had been found in Alaska near the mouth of the mighty Yukon River, and most of the Klondike prospectors flowed downriver to it. I've been fascinated by the Klondike gold rush since I was a school boy in Canada, reading the writing of Pierre Burton (famous Canadian author, former resident of Dawson City, whose father was one of those who came here during the Klondike Gold Rush and unlike most stayed in Dawson). On the...
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PortMoresby ·
One more for the list of wonderful things to see, the world's largest pinhole photograph at Washington D.C.'s National Air & Space Museum. So many things, so little time.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, July 30, 2014: Vegetables in Formal Garden, Musee Carnavalet

PHeymont ·
We've spotted some more vegetables among the ornamentals, this time at the Bassin de la Villette in northeast Paris. In the first picture, a gorgeous Swiss chard; in the second a delicate young artichoke has formed...
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Re: Shimmering Lakes and Romantic Palaces of Udaipur

DrFumblefinger ·
It's an incredibly beautiful place. I do love the light a dawn and dusk around the lake! Thanks for sharing your love of this place with everyone.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 29, 2014: Berlin's Fernsehturm

MAD Travel Diaries ·
Very nice. My only time visiting Berlin was for the Christmas Markets and I was too focused on mulled wine! I need to go back during the year and actually explore these monuments.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 29, 2014: Berlin's Fernsehturm

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by MAD Travel Diaries: Very nice. My only time visiting Berlin was for the Christmas Markets and I was too focused on mulled wine! I need to go back during the year and actually explore these monuments. I also know the impact of mulled wine on a cool day
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 29, 2014: Berlin's Fernsehturm

PHeymont ·
I guess I'll need to explore the mulled wine when I get back...we were focused on beer and currywurst!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, July 30, 2014: Vegetables in Formal Garden, Musee Carnavalet

PortMoresby ·
If you like beautiful food gardens, I think you'd love this one in Versailles: http://www.potager-du-roi.fr/site/potager/index.htm I spent a good part of a day there, not long after the restored garden opened to the public, taking pictures in a drizzly rain. Not what you'd think of for a garden in Versailles, but wonderful.
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Re: Gallery: Lilac Garden, Spokane, Washington

MsK ·
Beautiful, and a wonderful story to go with it. We have a lilac in our back yard . . . waiting for it to bloom.
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Re: Gallery: Lilac Garden, Spokane, Washington

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the kind comment! And welcome to TravelGumbo. Needlessly said, I also have lilacs in my yard and enjoy watching them come to life each spring. Their perfume is, perhaps second only to jasmine, my favorite floral scent.
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Re: Montmorency Falls (Chute Montmorency), Quebec. Where Gumbo was #52

Jonathan L ·
It is beautiful. I think I was there about 38 years ago on a family trip after the Olympics. The cliffs and height of the fall gave me the St. Lawrence (after your last clue), but I could figure the exact place. Good Job!
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PHeymont ·
I did, indeed, go to the two exhibits at the Met...and they actually have a relation to the SF show that PortMoresby has described. Marville, in particular, was working at the beginning of photography, without all the digital devices, or even a light meter, and with media so slow that a photograph of a relatively busy street appears to be empty of traffic—because during the 30 seconds needed to expose that plate no one stayed in front of the camera long enough to register an image! The Paris...
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PortMoresby ·
Maybe "monochrome" is a better word for what we think of as black & white photography. An extreme example would be cyanotypes, in shades of blue. Many thanks, PHeymont, for your descriptions of the Met shows, and for reminding me that everything old is new again. The addition of Man Ray's fantastic picture above is perfect. Joyeux Anniversaire, Tour Eiffel.
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PortMoresby ·
Speaking again of black&white, the monthly events newsletter from Mrs. Dalloway's Literary & Garden Arts store in Berkeley just arrived. Down at the very bottom was this intiguing notice which I mean to check out in person in 11 days. Mrs. Dalloways is at 2904 College Avenue in Berkeley. mrsdalloways.com "The Watchmaker Series." Beautiful black and white silver gelatin prints on archival quality paper. Ready for 8 x 10 frame. $65. When Craig was asked to fix a case that contained a...
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

DrFumblefinger ·
Among my greatest photography influences were Matthew Brady, whose grainy and gritty images of the Civil War made it so very "real" to future generations just learning about it in history books. And of course the great work of Ansel Adams. Far from gritty and grainy. Truly a visionary.
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PortMoresby ·
Did you know that the visionary faked 'Moonrise, Hernandez'? Yep. I guess you could say "enhanced". There was no moon. Information courtesy of a friend who worked with AA. Said he was the nicest guy ever.
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

GarryRF ·
I enjoy photos of local history. Places that you can visit today with buildings that remain mostly unchanged. This is Lord Street Liverpool around 1890. ....and present day Lord Street - (from a different angle)
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PortMoresby ·
Another addition to the list of current shows of great photography, this one in Paris. Ten years after his death, Henri Cartier-Bresson at the Pompidou, until June 9th.
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Re: Biggest Apple Ever: NY Gets 54M Tourists, Expects More!

DrFumblefinger ·
Are you sure that number is correct? Paris does just over 20 million visitors a year.
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