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Tagged With "Kohala District, Hawaii"

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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? 21.0

PortMoresby ·
Pheymont, there are 50 states now, including Hawaii.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? 21.0

PHeymont ·
Speaking of Hawaii...here's another puzzle: Which state is Hawaii's nearest U.S. neighbor?
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? 21.0

PHeymont ·
Well, I didn't expect anyone to twig it quite that fast, and it's not just because of a polar route. Although we usually don't think of Hawaii extending north of Kauai, in fact the state includes the entire Hawaiian Ridge/Emperor Seamount chain, running up to the Aleutian trench, just off Alaska's Aleutian islands. Mostly underwater, mostly administered by Federal agencies as a preservation/conservation area. Kure Atoll and Green Island is the northernmost habitable place in Hawaii, and it's...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? 21.0

DrFumblefinger ·
Here's tonight's clues: 1) Gumbo is not in Hawaii 2) Gumbo did not fly the polar route to get to this destination.
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Re: The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

arion ·
I'm leaving next week for San Diego and then a 17 day cruise to and around the Hawaiian Islands. I have never been all that interested in Hawaii (so why am I going you ask?) but your blog and photos have begun to pique my curiosity. Thank you. (I am not looking forward to going through U.S. Immigration, I can tell you that. It is quite unpleasant for non-Americans.)
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Re: The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
US Immigration is a bit of a hassle, although most Canadians receive about a smooth a ride as possible. In most Canadian airports, you can actually clear immigration within Canada, rather than the USA (infinitely preferable because the lines are so much shorter). Not sure if that's true of Montreal, though. Thank you for your kind words about the Hawaii blogs. Hawaii is a special place. I've always gone and explored it by myself, so in this setting I tend to drift to isolated places that are...
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Re: Is trip cancellation insurance really worth it?

Former Member ·
My elderly mother bought it when she went on a cruise. For her, it made sense because her health is not so good. She might have had to cancel and did not want to lose her deposit. The policy that she bought was specifically for trip cancellation but did not cover health issues or other unexpected issues during the trip. That policy would have covered a deposit refund but not all of them do. There are lots of different types of trip insurance so one has to ask lots of questions. As it turns...
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Re: New Orleans—Museum Highlights Young Voices of Resilience

Bluragger ·
Great piece! Yes, it is good to hear from our children about what they learned in the past decade living in New Orleans after the storm. So many were impacted, many were harmed and suffered PTSD. Great to hear kids speak about the positive outcomes from their Katrina experiences. I can't wait for the new LA Childrens Museum to open in its new and amazing facility in City Park, another NOLA gem. Ya'll come visit soon and often to experience a city like no other, New Orleans. It has not been...
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Re: Amsterdam councillors: cheap visitors, stay home!

GarryRF ·
It's because the beer, dining, hotels, museum, coffee shops and the red light district are so expensive we can't afford to stay longer. Perhaps Udo Kock should change the image of Amsterdam away from drugs and prostitution so that the more discerning traveller - like myself - would make it a week instead of a weekend.
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Re: Turkey, Tunisia, Egypt seeing visitors again

PortMoresby ·
I find "...Spain is only on top if the Balearics are included..." an odd addition, not unlike saying the US is only on top if Hawaii is included. Am I missing something?
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Re: Do traveling Brits hate kids?

GarryRF ·
Getting a 25 hour flight can be a painless experience with the correct preparation. Music, books and magazines. But taking a young child who screams with inner ear pressure problems is a nightmare and no one gets to sleep. So you arrive with no sleep for maybe 36 hours. Of course we love kids as much as anyone. I've been on an American flight to Hawaii where all the other passengers were kids on spring break. That flight should have carried a health warning. They behaved like animals. Yes...
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Waikiki

DrFumblefinger ·
Signs of the Modern Culture, indeed, Garry. Waikiki is about as new a neighborhood as you'll find in any major city. There are no old man-made artifacts or structures here. How long will it last? Like most modern culture, it likely will keep evolving trying to keep up with the times. Old places torn down to be replaced with newer structures. But Hawaii certainly does have places built by the early civilizations that inhabited it. It's not clear when man settled these islands but let's say...
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Re: Finally an airline does it right! Larger overhead bin

DrFumblefinger ·
Larger carry-ons won't be allowed. Just more of them. If you are among the last folks on a long flight (say to Hawaii) now, your carry-on will be checked as there is not enough bin space. People need to be cautious about taking stuff out of a bin -- that doesn't change with more or less bags in them.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#115)

Ottoman ·
This was a tough one. The first couple of photos made me think this might be Death Valley or possibly Saddle Road on the Big Island of Hawaii, but the last couple of photos clinched it for me. If you look closely at the rocks the vendor is selling, you can make out images of what appear to be animals, possibly birds. The last photo looks like it shows some carving in the sand. Such a desolate place...my guess would be the Nazca Lines, Peru.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#113)

Roderick Simpson ·
I suspect the background is real. I have never been to Hawaii, and remembering from a long time ago the opening credits of the TV series Hawaii 50, I wonder if this could be a carved bow of a canoe from there or some other Pacific Island..
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Re: July 10, 2019: Zippy's Plate Lunch, Oahu

PHeymont ·
On our one trip to Hawaii, we ate in a few top-shelf listed-in-food-mags places, but in the end, my only real culinary memories of Hawaii are all the plate lunches and one incredible loco moco in Hilo... Thanks for bringing back pleasant memories!
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Re: One-Clue Mystery: Name the Place!

DrFumblefinger ·
Exactly. Sometimes the blog from which the mystery clue is taken posts Tueday, sometimes later. The deadline, surprisingly, has never been an issue so far. Usually people who solve it get it very early. But we'll accept midnight Hawaii time.
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Ruthie Turner

Ruthie Turner
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Travel Luver

Travel Luver
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Re: Books That Send You Packing...

Former Member ·
There are so very many great travel tales. I am partial to non-fiction. I enjoy reading well researched, historical accounts of the human drama that is within the scenery. I enjoy writing that gives a strong sense of place and context to what I see. " The Old Patagonian Express " by Paul Theroux " The Pillars of Hercules " by Paul Theroux " Cut Stones and Crossroads: A Journey to Peru " by Ronald Wright " Basin and Range " by John McPhee " Two Years Before the Mast " by Richard Henry Dana,...
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Re: Where's a Warm Spot for March

DrFumblefinger ·
Welcome, Gulliver, and two weeks will give you a nice break. I'm not sure where you're traveling from. Easiest and cheapest place for a warm break from North America is to head south, especially to Florida or the Caribbean, or from the West coast to Hawaii or Arizona. But the south of Europe is also quite nice this time of year. Italy, Sicily, Greece are places I'd consider going, depending on what interests you and where you've traveled before. Do any of these interest you? Are you...
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Re: The Big Island of Hawaii (Part 1). Volcanoes Park

PHeymont ·
Great pictures, and great memories. This was our favorite part of Hawaii...especially the "end of the road" where the park highway suddenly comes to an end against a pile of lava from a few years ago. It's a big tourist attraction, yes, but it seemed much less so than many other places on the islands.
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Re: On Thursday the 'Red Light Secrets Museum of...

GarryRF ·
If you visit the Red Light District be warned ! Taking photo's is frowned upon. You may find your camera gets removed and dropped in the Canal ! Many of the guys walking around outside are Pimps. You may think they're all Basketball Players !
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Re: Hawaii: Coping with Hurricane Ana

DrFumblefinger ·
The sun did indeed come out today (Tuesday). As you can see from the attached photo. Lots of photos of the trip already up on Gumbo on the Go, with more to follow. Check out that link here: https://www.travelgumbo.com/clips?fileType=IMAGE
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Re: Hawaii: Coping with Hurricane Ana

GarryRF ·
Some of the best long haul flights stop off in interesting places. That's why I love taking a few days in San Francisco. And Hawaii. Mainly because I can walk for miles. So many US cities are not "Pedestrian friendly" I'm off to search the internet for Kona Coffee ! I have noticed that the Islands have the most memorable Flag of all the US States ! Thanks DrF !
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Re: Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Redux

GarryRF ·
Hmm.... maybe I was right ! I have no wish to terminate my "footloose" attitude. Sounds like a lake with thin ice. Diamond Head on Hawaii was my limit !
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Re: Pineapple field, Dole Plantation

DrFumblefinger ·
Pineapples grown in Hawaii are consumed in Hawaii. There is no export to the lower 48 states. Between the locals and tourists that's still a lot of pineapples. Shipping anything to or from a remote island is expensive. Mainland USA gets a lot of its pineapples from Central America.
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Re: Coastal California: A Village, a Hamlet, and a Wide Spot in the Road

PortMoresby ·
The Stage Stop is one of those buildings that's become invisible, even while being half the commercial district of San Gregorio. Maybe this illustrates the fact that we see things differently when we're in the picture zone, that it was the first time I really looked at it. I assume it was a gas station, looks like a pump rusting there on the left. But even I'm not old enough to have seen it in action.
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Re: Canada's Westjet enters Trans-Atlantic market

PHeymont ·
If they do as well at this venture as they clearly hope, that could change rapidly, especially since the 737s are what make it necessary to stop in Newfoundland and fly no further than Ireland. They already had a "wet-lease" arrangement with Thomas Cook, which provided 2 757s and pilots for Hawaii service, and according to this article they are considering dry-leasing (their own pilots) 767s, A330s or more for expanded European routes, perhaps as early as next year.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, May 18, 2014: Lower Manhattan's New Skyline

Jonathan L ·
You may have noticed that NYC has 2 areas of very tall buildings - The Battery/Financial District and Midtown, separated by an large area where building height is limited. This was not just due to zoning. The reason is geological. The bedrock is very close to the surface in Midtown and Battery so there is support for very tall buildings. However, From 34th street down to Canal the bedrock is much deeper and the ground is more sandy/gravely, so it was unsafe to build tall buildings in area.
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Re: Tourists love Florida!

DrFumblefinger ·
Canada's population is about 35 million total, so if all 26.7 million visitors to Florida were from Canada, that would mean there'd be nobody left to shovel all that snow! Kidding aside, Canadians love to travel, especially in the winter. Florida is popular, especially with those in the eastern part of the country. Canadians living out west are much more likely to go to Arizona, Palm Springs, Mexico or Hawaii. I don't know where the national breakdown is, but lots of Europeans like to bring...
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A tropical oasis: Wahiawa Botanical Garden, Oahu

DrFumblefinger ·
  I'm fond of exploring parks and libraries in the cities I visit, for different reasons.  Libraries are fun because I love and collect books, and because the quality of a city's libraries tells me a lot about that city's priorities. ...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, November 24, 2014: Le Pouce de Cesar Sculpture - Paris

MAD Travel Diaries ·
  Paris may be famous for its architecture and many ornate historic sculptures scattered around the city but one of the more modern sculptures that is 50/50 with people is Le Pouce de César in the business district of La Defense. It...
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Copenhagen: More Than Nyhavn and The Little Mermaid

Caroline Coupe ·
  Copenhagen is an incredible city, a place where a rich history meets modern culture. The Danish capital boasts historic palaces and churches, sprawling gardens and parks, canals, and world-renowned fine dining. In preparing for my move here...
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Gallery: Signs of Waikiki

DrFumblefinger ·
    There's a lot you can tell about a city simply by looking at small things, like its signage or public art.  Every place has unique and interesting shops and landmarks that add to its personality.  I've posted several...
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Memphis, Tennessee: 1) Graceland

DrFumblefinger ·
  3764 Elvis Presley Blvd.  It’s an address most Elvis fans know by heart because that’s where you’ll find Graceland .  Graceland is THE place every Elvis must visit at least once in their lifetime.  Not only was...
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Charleston's Grand Mansions: Joseph Manigault House

PortMoresby ·
  On a recent visit to Charleston, South Carolina, I bought a 2-day pass, called the Charleston Heritage Passport , at the North Charleston Visitor Center near the airport, and planned to include as many of the sites it offered of...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, January 29, 2015: The art of lava

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm often amazed at how beautiful the small things in nature can be.  Whether a bee pollinating a flower, a wild animal stopping to look at you, a blade of grass struggling to grow in a desert, or how sculpted lava can seem.   These photos...
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Memphis, Tennessee 3) The rest of the city

DrFumblefinger ·
        There’s a lot more to Memphis than Graceland, although  Graceland is by far the city’s most popular attraction (which I’ve previously discussed here ).   A city of about 650,000, Memphis has a...
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Cruising through the holidays

Marilyn Jones ·
    Every year thousands of passengers find out warm tropical breezes and Christmas festivities mix well aboard a Princess Cruise Line ship.  “We install more than 347 Christmas trees fleet wide. Each vessel has a showcase tree in...
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The Medieval Fortress and Town of Chinon

DrFumblefinger ·
  There are few places in France of greater historic importance than Chinon.  You wouldn’t know that by what you see when you drive thru it today as it seems a small sleepy rural town.  You’ll see little evidence of...
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San Marino

rbciao ·
This past May I was able to satisfy a childhood dream of visiting San Marino. After completing a fourth grade report on this place we finally spent a night there. This also comes after traveling in Italy since 1980. The republic is a beautiful place...
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The Valley Island of Maui: 3) Central, Upcountry and South Maui

DrFumblefinger ·
 The largest stretch of (relatively) flat land on Maui is the valley between the two volcanoes, Haleakala and the West Maui Mountains.  This area is commonly called “Central Maui” and it’s here most locals live....
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The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Volcanoes never cease to fascinate me!  Something about their massive size and primal earth shaping power appeals to my sense of curiosity and awe.  So it’s not surprising that I find Haleakala to be Maui’s most interesting place...
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Island Air: Even Billionaires Get Airline Blues

PHeymont ·
Larry Ellison, of Oracle fame and billions (he's one of the world's richest) is still having trouble keeping Island Air (he owns it all) flying to Lanai, Hawaii (he owns 97%). Since acquiring the airline a bit over a year ago, there have been problems...
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Washington State’s Long Beach Peninsula

DrFumblefinger ·
 For most travelers, the southwestern corner of Washington state is easy to bypass.  It lies well over an hour’s drive from the busy I-5 Interstate Freeway.  The broad mouth of the Columbia River limits access from the Oregon...
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The Island Metropolis of Singapore

DrFumblefinger ·
Except for the stifling humidity, steamy heat and admixture of tropical rain-forest, Singapore will remind you more of Chicago or New York than most Asian cities.  Its skyline is as packed with modern...
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Chicago — City of Skyscrapers & Cloud Gate

DrFumblefinger ·
Like the monolith in Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke’s monumental film, 2001: A Space Odyssey, “Cloud Gate” looks like an alien object dropped onto a terrestrial landscape (not the African Savannah, but rather into...
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Lisbon: Cheap, but Steep!

PHeymont ·
That’s my short take on Lisbon after two weeks there last summer. A variety of economic factors, not all connected with the Euro crisis of the past few years, have made Portugal incredibly cheap for foreign travelers—but you have to be...
 
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