Tagged With "Germany"

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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 2) the German cars

PHeymont ·
Looking at that last car in such poor condition made me think of the Rusted Dreams cars I posted about...I thought they must be goners, but if this one is restorable, many of those might be or have been! See some rustoration cars HERE : A Field of (Rusted) Dreams
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 2) the German cars

DrFumblefinger ·
I was quite amazed at what you can do to restore a vehicle if you have the time, money and the inclination. A great thing about the Tampa Bay Automobile Museum is that it sits beside a machinest shop. We met a machinist while there who was custom making parts for one of the cars in the collection. The benefit of having your own factory to help you rebuild your car collection!!
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Re: Left Hand Drive Vs Right Hand Drive Countries

GarryRF ·
When two moving Stagecoaches were facing each other on a narrow track the driver would crack the whip - using his right hand - and cause the Horses to shy to the left and away from the noise it made. So they passed each other without hindrance.
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Re: Left Hand Drive Vs Right Hand Drive Countries

George G. ·
On September 3rd, 1967 Dagen H (or “H-Day”), short for Högertrafikomläggningen (“the right-hand traffic diversion”) millions of Swedes switched from driving on the left side of the road to driving on the right. Looks like fun from a distance.
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Re: Left Hand Drive Vs Right Hand Drive Countries

PHeymont ·
The Swedish experience is fascinating. Here's a link to more details. What makes it especially fascinating is that Sweden had always had cars with the driver and steering on the left, initially American imports, but had driven on the left. I would have expected a surge in minor accidents at the time of the change, but instead, the article says, the accident rate dropped sharply because drivers were now better placed to deal with oncoming traffic!
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Re: Art Under Your Feet

DrFumblefinger ·
A fascinating collection, PHeymont! It's amazing what you can see when you look around -- and down at your feet! Here's another for your collection, from the Czech Republic.
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

PHeymont ·
Thanks for the start of an extraordinary journey, which also reminds us that travel isn't only for pleasure, or even always voluntary. It is also important for us never to reduce history to acts of state and leaders and lose sight of all the Reiners of the world.
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

Travel Rob ·
What a discovery! And thanks for taking us along. I can't wait to hear what happens.
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

DrFumblefinger ·
Baited, hooked and (almost) landed, like I'm some kind of reading marlin! Can't wait for the next installment! Wonderfully done, HistoryDigger! Thanks so much for sharing this story with us!
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

Sarah Towle ·
Fantastic! A WWII story, personal journey and travel story all rolled into one! I'm totally hooked and will be following your unfolding story this summer, Whitney! All luck!
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

vivie ·
Merveilleux!! Un vrai bijou! Thanks so much for sharing this amazing story. Can't wait to read more.
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

HistoryDigger ·
Merci bien, Vivie. À Dimanche.
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

Jessica Meddows ·
This really is a wonderful post, Whitney. I love the family history you have there. And fantastic photos! I'm looking forward to reading more of your writing.
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Re: Finding Reiner: Disaster to Discovery

HistoryDigger ·
Thanks, Jessica, for your kind words. I'll check out your blog as well.
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Re: Big boom in glass-bottom bridges

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, but no thanks!
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Re: Big boom in glass-bottom bridges

PHeymont ·
I'm with you there...I love spectacular views as much as the next guy, but when I'm looking down a long way I feel nervous chills...add that to a swaying bridge, and I'm, well, not there!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, March 8, 2015: Bernkastel-Keus, Germany

GarryRF ·
Beautiful part of Germany. Following the Moselle or the River Rhine you'll see fairytale castles and villages. Taking a cruise down either river is a must see.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, March 8, 2015: Bernkastel-Keus, Germany

PHeymont ·
I remember this area from trips with my family from Heidelberg, where we lived for a while...and I learned to love the area's wines!
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

Travel Rob ·
Another part of the agreement is of interest to US travelers. We can only spend 90 days in the Schengen country for every 180 day period,without having to contend with Visas . I haven't heard too much about the consequences of overstaying the 90 days ,until I saw this comment online about getting a $500 fine for overstaying. http://www.latimes.com/travel/...-20150405-story.html More info on the 90/180 day rule http://www.latimes.com/travel/...20150329-story.html#
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Re: 20-year anniversary for 'Stolpersteine' memorials

DrFumblefinger ·
I found them very thoughtful and moving memorials. By placing them in the pavement, people keep polishing them with their feet. As I've said before, there's no people I know that have faced the crimes of their past generations the way today's Germans face their Nazi infamy.
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Re: 20-year anniversary for 'Stolpersteine' memorials

HistoryDigger ·
I love this project and spend my time looking for Stolperstein when I travel in Europe.
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Re: Ryanair boss: We'll crush German competitors

GarryRF ·
Most of Mr O'Leary's predictions are just attention seeking and looking for free advertising. If you look on you tube you'll see a list of his comedy acts and predictions for Ryanair from the past years. A very successful man with an Irish sense of humour.
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Re: Ryanair boss: We'll crush German competitors

PHeymont ·
All that true, but he has picked a couple of truly vulnerable targets...
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

Travel Rob ·
I don't share the nostalgia for border crossings, having experienced some of the worst crossings in the world in the late 80's And while Schengen said it wiped out land borders for travelers throughout most of Europe, I've still experienced controls in those countries . On one such occasion ,I took a bus from Brussels to Paris and the bus was stopped twice in France. ID was checked and people questioned. Even bags were inspected for people from Romania and Bulgaria.
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

PHeymont ·
Interesting, given the history of prejudice against Romany, that those countries were singled out. At the time they were not yet Schengen members, either, although they are now in the process of joining, leaving only Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland and UK out among EU members. The non-EU members of Schengen are Norway, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Iceland.
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

DrFumblefinger ·
From a historic perspective, I think it's still a little early to know if this was all good for Europe or not. The border crossings are definitely easier and faster, and I, too, miss the passport stamps no longer on my pages. For me the greatest convenience is the common currency -- not having to change money so often, usually at a loss. Of course, some would argue that the Euro is the greatest weakness of the EU (will it survive?), so I'm not sure in the long run how this will all play out.
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Re: Look east! Gallery re-examines East German interior decor

Travel Rob ·
I did find the Communist Eastern European architecture and decor very bland at the time but people made the most of what they had .I was impressed how people kept items working.
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Re: Finding Reiner #5: Behind the Veil of Time

PHeymont ·
I am just now catching up on reading, and I continue to be touched by not only your persistence and care in searching for Reiner, but also helping us search for meaning in so much that has been left behind in our understanding, because it doesn't fit under the grand tags that "simplify" history for posterity. This summer commemorates the start of World War I, important events of the end of World War II...and yet, so little of the individuals and their fates. Even the exhibits we saw this...
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Re: Finding Reiner #5: Behind the Veil of Time

HistoryDigger ·
I am finding the same is true for all wars I have studied. We know so little about the people in the trenches whose lives meant little to the leaders. I hope this bog series reveals at least one life. The journey to find Reiner has been life-changing for me, his nephew's wife.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Carlin Scherer ·
It is a sad - difficult story. I want to meet Reiner too. Your work and research and photos of the land where he was "found" bring his story alive - right here, right now!
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Travel Rob ·
Very powerful. I keep thinking of that local man's mothers story and it's similar to stories I've heard from some ,in the the WW2 generation living in Eastern Europe ,about the Russian Army of WW2.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm really enjoying this moving series, History Digger. It is a captivating narrative. Admire your dogged determination to find the truth. Thanks for making us all a part of your journey.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Travel Rob ·
I wanted to add the photography by Pawel Wyszomirski is just wonderful and timeless. Really captures your journey.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Amazing story indeed. I've heard many recollections from veterans of WW2 and all of them beyond belief. When I was a schoolboy (in England) my Math Teacher was in the real "Great Escape" in 1944 and told us boys stories to make your hair stand up ! But when he told us of the Germans making an "example" of repeat escapees his eyes were full of the horrors of war. Then we'd get back to the Math lesson. "Tomorrow we'll found out how we hid the guard dogs!"
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
GarryRF, Thanks for your response. I'd like to hear those stories, despite the horror in them. What a way to teach kids math. Yikes.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Whitney. I was just emailing TravelRob. Maybe you could contact a TV station here in England. The Centenary of WW1 is big news across Europe this year 1914 - 1918 and we have many programmes looking back at all the wars since. Have you seen the "Great Escape" Movie. ( Steve McQueen - James Garner and all ) ? Some facts are true - some "based" on the true story. It's very late here in England. Contact you tomorrow.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
Yes, I love the Great Escape! Let's talk more.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Just having lunch - what subject you interested in ? Prison Camps, What was untrue in the Great Escape or what was true ? Vanishing guard dogs ?
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
ALL of those. Wish I could sit down for lunch with you and hear the rest. I'm quite interested in using my Reiner research material for various genres—adult lit, young adult lit, and film.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
As you've seen in the Great Escape, taking prisoners into the forest and killing them wasn't just a Russian idea. It was used against the Allied POWs by the SS. But there were many allied airmen shot down over Germany who returned home after the war with life saving surgery by the "enemy" Metal plates fitted to the skull where the bone had been shot away I remember. Shall I send an email to your website Whitney ?
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
GarryRF. Yes please send that email. Or DM me on Twitter @whitneystewart2. My uncle was shot down by Germans, but was saved and mended by Partisans. See Finding Reiner #2.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

PHeymont ·
Just to add a note: on our way to Mont-Saint-Michel this morning, we noticed signs pointing to a Deutschesoldatenfriedhof, or German Soldiers' Cemetery. Curiosity took us to it and we were surprised by its story. It was constructed in 1961 for reburial of soldiers who had been buried in small locations all over Normandy, the Channel Islands and other nearby areas. It is a solemn place, and quiet, and the spirit expressed in the signs and in the design was one of reconciliation and hope for...
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
Paul, Thanks for that note about the German cemetery in France. I may make a trip to several of these war cemeteries on my next trip overseas. I just heard from the German War Graves Commission this morning with more photos of Reiner's grave.
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Re: Finding Reiner 4: Who Was He?

Travel Rob ·
Thanks for another moving piece. Those illustrations by Maria Lebedeva are museum quality!
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Re: Glimpses of Basel

IslandMan ·
Beautiful looking city, PH...thanks for sharing this stopover
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Re: Finding Reiner #2: Chasing Ghosts

vivie ·
what a great way to start a Sunday! can't wait to read more. I'm with you in spirit Merci pour ce beau partage historique et familial.
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Re: Finding Reiner #2: Chasing Ghosts

HistoryDigger ·
Merci encore une fois, Vivie. Je suis sur le point de partir. Thanks for reading. I'm about to depart. Hope you'll follow along.
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Re: Finding Reiner #2: Chasing Ghosts

Travel Rob ·
I found myself racing to the computer this morning to read Part 2 of your incredible and moving series. It's made me reflect on what war does to a family .
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Re: Finding Reiner #2: Chasing Ghosts

DrFumblefinger ·
Another brilliant post, HistoryDigger! Thanks. I think you've described the situation many young German men were in, and it's a lesson for all of us to fight tyranny at every step and with all we have. It is also a reminder to me how a government that is "a friend of the people" can crush those same people if their power isn't checked. After the Nazis had seized power, there was no tolerance for dissent. You were either with them -- or you were in big big trouble (possibly even fatal...
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Re: Finding Reiner #2: Chasing Ghosts

Bluragger ·
Here we go! I am so eager to learn more about that old house which is pictured so beautifully in the mountain idyll of Poland. My fantasy is of undiscovered family treasures in the attic which the Polish police, who now occupy that building, would gladly be rid of. Whit, don't forget to search the attic when you get there. Ha! I am sure glad you are Finding Reiner.
 
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