Tagged With "Germany"

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Re: Hamburg concert hall: Overdue, Over Budget, Finished

DrFumblefinger ·
Nothing like inept bureaucrats to run up the budget....Imagine, €300 for a toilet brush! I'm sure an adequate brush could have been purchased for €3. And that's just one example. Beautiful building, but at a cost of nearly $US 1 billion, it does seem a bit pricey.
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Re: Hamburg concert hall: Overdue, Over Budget, Finished

GarryRF ·
The German government were offering Hamburg as a suitable venue for the Olympic Games. The good people of Hamburg have said they no longer trust developers and politicians. No thank you. I find the new Concert Hall to be a monster on stilts. Not a pleasant view from any angle.
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Re: The Memorials of Berlin - Part 2

George G. ·
Excellent coverage and photos Jonathan. If I have a return trip to Berlin, these places will absolutely be on must see list.
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Re: The Memorials of Berlin - Part 2

Jonathan L ·
Thank you.
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Re: A Visit to Berlin's Reichstag (Where Gumbo Was #186)

DrFumblefinger ·
I never received your guess, Garry. But from your comment I knew you knew. I'll add your name to the list of people who got it right. KA F
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Oct 8, 2013: Cologne, Germany

PHeymont ·
The picture reminds me of similarly-colorful rows of small buildings in Nyhavn (Copenhagen) and on Bryggen (in Oslo). There must be something to the width-and-taxes idea, because it's certainly been true elsewhere. In New York, from colonial times until the early 20th-century, the number of windows affected the property tax rate, and it was only 2009 when the city ended the practice of basing the water rates on "frontage."
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Oct 8, 2013: Cologne, Germany

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the note, Pheymont. I saw the main BANK OF IRELAND building in Dublin a few days, which is windowless. All the window spaces were filled in with rock (in a tasteful manner). Seems the government decided to levy a window tax. The company responded in kind.
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Re: 20-year anniversary for 'Stolpersteine' memorials

DrFumblefinger ·
I found them very thoughtful and moving memorials. By placing them in the pavement, people keep polishing them with their feet. As I've said before, there's no people I know that have faced the crimes of their past generations the way today's Germans face their Nazi infamy.
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Re: 20-year anniversary for 'Stolpersteine' memorials

HistoryDigger ·
I love this project and spend my time looking for Stolperstein when I travel in Europe.
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Re: Following the European Beer Trail: Oktoberfest to Sorrento

PHeymont ·
Thanks! I enjoyed this...and hope that Sorrento's beer makes it here to the U.S. I'm going to contact our local importers to see if there's a chance!
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Re: Following the European Beer Trail: Oktoberfest to Sorrento

DrFumblefinger ·
My curiosity is also piqued about this Italian beer. Not sure if I tried beer in Italy. Wine seems to be flowing out of ever crack in every building, but I'll need to give it a try next time I'm there. Hi praise from a Canadian, I might add.
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Re: Following the European Beer Trail: Oktoberfest to Sorrento

GarryRF ·
Peroni is a good example of Italian Beer. Crisp tasting with a malty flavour. A white frothy head and sparkling. Available around the world. Drunk with Pizza and Italian food at UK restaurants.
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Re: Finding Reiner #7: Shrapnel & Bones

PHeymont ·
I can't help thinking, as I read your descriptions, and the memories of the people you met, at the people, old and young, caught up in Palestine and in Iraq in circumstances not very different. It is sad that we continue to live in a world where their wishes and hopes are of so little consequence to those who call the shots. Literally.
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Re: Finding Reiner #7: Shrapnel & Bones

HistoryDigger ·
I can't help thinking the same thing. If only we could see through the eyes of others.
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Re: Finding Reiner #7: Shrapnel & Bones

Carlin Scherer ·
Beautiful image - grabbing on to the spider web and flying into a peaceful land/world. Reiner wrote beautifully!!!
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Re: Finding Reiner #7: Shrapnel & Bones

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by Carlin Scherer: Beautiful image - grabbing on to the spider web and flying into a peaceful land/world. Reiner wrote beautifully!!! Reiner was a great writer, and I'm sure in the original German it's even more elegantly phrased than in this fine translation! PHeymont -- agree with the sentiment. Believe we'll always have evil, power grabbing tyrants in our midst and our challenge is not to keep them from seizing power. Not an easy task. I've been reading Eric Metaxas...
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Re: Finding Reiner #7: Shrapnel & Bones

HistoryDigger ·
DrFumblefinger—I've been meaning to read that book about Bonhoeffer. In fact, I'll do so, as soon as I finish Forgotten Holocaust: The Poles Under German Occupation, 1939-1944 by Richard C. Lukas and Norman Davies . My affection for the Polish people I've met has spurred me to deepen my understanding of the German occupation and devastation of Poland.
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Re: Prague: Fancy Rooftops, Flashy Facades

DrFumblefinger ·
I remember having the same feeling about Prague. A beautiful city of great architectural variety and all types of style. One of the more memorable views of the city is from up high, say from the observation deck of City Hall. The rooftops and towers are beautiful.
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Re: Autobahn driving hazards: ducks and planes

PHeymont ·
It must be duck season in Europe! Moments after I posted the story above, I found an Italian weekend story, with video, of Rome police holding up traffic in the Italian capital. A passerby posted a video of the action, and now, perhaps, ducks will replace cats in internet popularity. Anyway, here's the story, with the video embedded near the bottom
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Re: France catches 4.5 MILLION foreign speeders on camera

Mac ·
These fixed cameras are signposted and on maps so you have to be pretty unfortunate (or silly) to get 'done' by them. Far worse are their sneaky cameras that are hidden in roadside trash bins, under hedges and all sorts of camouflage. These are normally in villages where it makes real sense to slow right down.
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Re: France catches 4.5 MILLION foreign speeders on camera

DrFumblefinger ·
I suspected you were one of those 4.5 million foreigners that got tagged, Mac.....
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Re: Germans Reflect on Reunification

DrFumblefinger ·
I was in Berlin on Saturday, the day of the 25th anniversary of reunification. There were tons of people in the city, as crowded as I've ever seen any major city. The main activities were in the Tiergarten, especially around the Brandenburg gate. By the time we made our way there, the police had closed down the area and were not allowing more people in because it was overcrowded. Still, everyone seemed well behaved and having a nice time. I think most Germans feel reunification was a good...
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Re: Left Hand Drive Vs Right Hand Drive Countries

GarryRF ·
When two moving Stagecoaches were facing each other on a narrow track the driver would crack the whip - using his right hand - and cause the Horses to shy to the left and away from the noise it made. So they passed each other without hindrance.
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Re: Left Hand Drive Vs Right Hand Drive Countries

George G. ·
On September 3rd, 1967 Dagen H (or “H-Day”), short for Högertrafikomläggningen (“the right-hand traffic diversion”) millions of Swedes switched from driving on the left side of the road to driving on the right. Looks like fun from a distance.
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Re: Left Hand Drive Vs Right Hand Drive Countries

PHeymont ·
The Swedish experience is fascinating. Here's a link to more details. What makes it especially fascinating is that Sweden had always had cars with the driver and steering on the left, initially American imports, but had driven on the left. I would have expected a surge in minor accidents at the time of the change, but instead, the article says, the accident rate dropped sharply because drivers were now better placed to deal with oncoming traffic!
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Re: Emperor Ludwig's Ettal Monastery and Abbey, Bavaria

DrFumblefinger ·
A beautiful destination I was previously unaware of. Thanks, Samantha.
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Re: Emperor Ludwig's Ettal Monastery and Abbey, Bavaria

George G. ·
A beautiful monastery. Visited many times on our road trips from Augsburg to Garmisch and beyond. I never could drive by without stopping. One of my snowy day photos.
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Re: Ryanair boss: We'll crush German competitors

GarryRF ·
Most of Mr O'Leary's predictions are just attention seeking and looking for free advertising. If you look on you tube you'll see a list of his comedy acts and predictions for Ryanair from the past years. A very successful man with an Irish sense of humour.
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Re: Ryanair boss: We'll crush German competitors

PHeymont ·
All that true, but he has picked a couple of truly vulnerable targets...
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Re: Big boom in glass-bottom bridges

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, but no thanks!
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Re: Big boom in glass-bottom bridges

PHeymont ·
I'm with you there...I love spectacular views as much as the next guy, but when I'm looking down a long way I feel nervous chills...add that to a swaying bridge, and I'm, well, not there!
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 2) the German cars

PHeymont ·
Looking at that last car in such poor condition made me think of the Rusted Dreams cars I posted about...I thought they must be goners, but if this one is restorable, many of those might be or have been! See some rustoration cars HERE : A Field of (Rusted) Dreams
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 2) the German cars

DrFumblefinger ·
I was quite amazed at what you can do to restore a vehicle if you have the time, money and the inclination. A great thing about the Tampa Bay Automobile Museum is that it sits beside a machinest shop. We met a machinist while there who was custom making parts for one of the cars in the collection. The benefit of having your own factory to help you rebuild your car collection!!
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Re: Finding Reiner #5: Behind the Veil of Time

PHeymont ·
I am just now catching up on reading, and I continue to be touched by not only your persistence and care in searching for Reiner, but also helping us search for meaning in so much that has been left behind in our understanding, because it doesn't fit under the grand tags that "simplify" history for posterity. This summer commemorates the start of World War I, important events of the end of World War II...and yet, so little of the individuals and their fates. Even the exhibits we saw this...
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Re: Finding Reiner #5: Behind the Veil of Time

HistoryDigger ·
I am finding the same is true for all wars I have studied. We know so little about the people in the trenches whose lives meant little to the leaders. I hope this bog series reveals at least one life. The journey to find Reiner has been life-changing for me, his nephew's wife.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Carlin Scherer ·
It is a sad - difficult story. I want to meet Reiner too. Your work and research and photos of the land where he was "found" bring his story alive - right here, right now!
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Travel Rob ·
Very powerful. I keep thinking of that local man's mothers story and it's similar to stories I've heard from some ,in the the WW2 generation living in Eastern Europe ,about the Russian Army of WW2.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm really enjoying this moving series, History Digger. It is a captivating narrative. Admire your dogged determination to find the truth. Thanks for making us all a part of your journey.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Travel Rob ·
I wanted to add the photography by Pawel Wyszomirski is just wonderful and timeless. Really captures your journey.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Amazing story indeed. I've heard many recollections from veterans of WW2 and all of them beyond belief. When I was a schoolboy (in England) my Math Teacher was in the real "Great Escape" in 1944 and told us boys stories to make your hair stand up ! But when he told us of the Germans making an "example" of repeat escapees his eyes were full of the horrors of war. Then we'd get back to the Math lesson. "Tomorrow we'll found out how we hid the guard dogs!"
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
GarryRF, Thanks for your response. I'd like to hear those stories, despite the horror in them. What a way to teach kids math. Yikes.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Whitney. I was just emailing TravelRob. Maybe you could contact a TV station here in England. The Centenary of WW1 is big news across Europe this year 1914 - 1918 and we have many programmes looking back at all the wars since. Have you seen the "Great Escape" Movie. ( Steve McQueen - James Garner and all ) ? Some facts are true - some "based" on the true story. It's very late here in England. Contact you tomorrow.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
Yes, I love the Great Escape! Let's talk more.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Just having lunch - what subject you interested in ? Prison Camps, What was untrue in the Great Escape or what was true ? Vanishing guard dogs ?
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
ALL of those. Wish I could sit down for lunch with you and hear the rest. I'm quite interested in using my Reiner research material for various genres—adult lit, young adult lit, and film.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
As you've seen in the Great Escape, taking prisoners into the forest and killing them wasn't just a Russian idea. It was used against the Allied POWs by the SS. But there were many allied airmen shot down over Germany who returned home after the war with life saving surgery by the "enemy" Metal plates fitted to the skull where the bone had been shot away I remember. Shall I send an email to your website Whitney ?
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
GarryRF. Yes please send that email. Or DM me on Twitter @whitneystewart2. My uncle was shot down by Germans, but was saved and mended by Partisans. See Finding Reiner #2.
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

PHeymont ·
Just to add a note: on our way to Mont-Saint-Michel this morning, we noticed signs pointing to a Deutschesoldatenfriedhof, or German Soldiers' Cemetery. Curiosity took us to it and we were surprised by its story. It was constructed in 1961 for reburial of soldiers who had been buried in small locations all over Normandy, the Channel Islands and other nearby areas. It is a solemn place, and quiet, and the spirit expressed in the signs and in the design was one of reconciliation and hope for...
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

HistoryDigger ·
Paul, Thanks for that note about the German cemetery in France. I may make a trip to several of these war cemeteries on my next trip overseas. I just heard from the German War Graves Commission this morning with more photos of Reiner's grave.
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Re: Art Under Your Feet

DrFumblefinger ·
A fascinating collection, PHeymont! It's amazing what you can see when you look around -- and down at your feet! Here's another for your collection, from the Czech Republic.
 
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