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Tagged With "Britain Civil Aviation Authority"

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Re: Antarctica, part 3. Antarctica Rocks!

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Kirsten, Behind in my emails, but did want you to know that the last of your series on Celebrating Nature went live today. I want to personally thank you so very much for sharing your tremendous talents with our audience. I enjoyed reading -- and learned a lot -- from your posts and greatly enjoyed your wonderful photography! I'm sure many others did, too. If you have more material you'd like to post on TravelGumbo in the coming months, it would be our pleasure to host it. Hope you had a...
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Re: The Floating Reed Islands of the Uros People, Lake Titicaca. (Where Gumbo was #139)

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by Neil McAleer: One great stride to disseminate visual and text information. No flumbling fingers involved! Neil McAleer Great praise from a great author! Neil wrote a number of space-related books (google him), and corresponded with famous astronaut Neil Armstrong, to whom his post alludes.
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Re: St. Michael's Church, Charleston

George G. ·
Beautiful stained glass window photos. Charleston is known as the Holy City because of the many churches of many faiths. An acquaintance of mine, Andy Brack is the author of the Charleston Currents web page that weekly reports political, educational, nature, and people issues for the city of Charleston. He also runs a mystery photo once a week and St. Michael's was once used in that contest.
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Re: October 5, 2018: Sweets Shop, Delhi

Amateuremigrant ·
Actually K, neither would I, but as the author of 'Supernature' it was kinda in his brief ! His friend advised the beef tapeworm because they're easier to evict than pork ones (!) - he had to eat ~50% extra to placate the sucker (sic) BTW resistances don't really last that long but you're right, I very rarely got, or get ill.
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Re: George Orwell Sights

PortMoresby ·
Eric Arthur Blair, Orwell's real name, is buried in a little churchyard in Oxfordshire, England (photo #18 in the Telegraph slide show). I've visited him there, a pilgrimage of sorts, and recommend it to anyone who's interested in the author. A peaceful and quintessentially English churchyard.
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Re: Where Gumbo Was #14: A Sewer Journey

TravelandNature ·
How people have solved civil engineering problems is of great interest to many persons. I have visited the Egouts several times over the years. It is very interesting to see how the engineers went about providing - and continue to do provide - this important service for the growing city. A related infrastructure challenge for developing areas is always how to provide clean water for the populace. In Istanbul, it is possible to visit one of the ancient cisterns to see how this feat was...
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Re: "Mind Your Manners!" VisitBritain Warns Hoteliers

GarryRF ·
The Author of these "Do's and Don'ts" is a Trainee Journalist and has gathered this list without leaving the comfort of her armchair. Lazy journalism based on stereotypes you find in cheap travel guides. Maybe we could start a list of "Do's and Dont's" for US Hotels and employees ? #1 : DONT say "You guys from Europe all sound the same !"
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Re: "Mind Your Manners!" VisitBritain Warns Hoteliers

PHeymont ·
Perhaps not a trainee journalist. Since the list came from the government's tourism promotion agency, we might presume the author to be a Trainee Bureaucrat, who someday will be, sadly, writing the rules! Originally Posted by GarryRF: The Author of these "Do's and Don'ts" is a Trainee Journalist and has gathered this list without leaving the comfort of her armchair. Lazy journalism based on stereotypes you find in cheap travel guides. Maybe we could start a list of "Do's and Dont's" for US...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I never try to judge historic figures through the prism of modern values. Remember in the 18th century slavery was a global institution -- absolutely every country in the world had slaves. And being from Virginia, he knew the southern states wouldn't join northern colonies in forming a new country without slavery being allowed, so I don't think he thought it was time to fight that fight. I think he valued the formation of the new country above all else -- risking his life to do so...
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Re: Frommer's New EasyGuides: A Future for Print

DrFumblefinger ·
I think the series will improve, GarryRF. Unlike Wiley's and Google, who really are just business guys who weren't passionate about travel, Pauline and Arthur do care about the experience. The quality of a guidebook depends largely on the author/researcher, but good editorial direction is very important. Passion about something matters. Clearly you have it about your home and your travels. We hope our readers find this website has it, too. We love travel related stuff!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 15 2013: Blue Lady at White Waltham - retro-revival in England

DrFumblefinger ·
A brilliant photo, Mac! A perfect moment on a perfect day! Appreciate you sharing it with us One of my favorite pictures on this website.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 15 2013: Blue Lady at White Waltham - retro-revival in England

Former Member ·
my gramms wore that dress and had that luggage ! awesome picture. this girl is SO pretty.
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Re: Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other. (Part 5) The Elephants of Pinnawala

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, PortMoresby! And we've not even been to the sacred tooth relic in Kandy, the medieval ruins of Polonnaruwa, the beautiful hill country filled with tea plantations and "The World's End", a wildlife safari at Yala National Park, nor any of the nice beaches (but keep reading -- reports on these are coming). Sri Lanka is a great destination, especially now that the civil war is over. I was doubly lucky to not only be able to visit a dear friend there but to have time to leisurely explore...
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Re: Capital of Culture Series: Liverpool

PHeymont ·
No, not thinking of mills and chimneys, necessarily--note my very pre-Industrial Revolution examples--but certainly industrial, and by the nature of sizable cities with people living in close quarters and with the side-products of their industry, an argument can be made for dirty. It's not a slam...it's just the condition of cities that are alive. Here's a quotation, by the way, from the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health: The industrial revolution in England had by the beginning...
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Re: Capital of Culture Series: Liverpool

PortMoresby ·
Originally Posted by PHeymont: According to JECH, there is an exhibit of reconstructed "back houses" at the Liverpool Museum of Liverpool Life. That must be a fascinating museum! And the author mentioned that while most of the back houses were town down in urban renewal, the few that remain have been turned into luxury housing! I visited a block of "back to backs" in Birmingham, the last left after thousands were demolished in the move to urban renewal in the city center. They've been...
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Re: Jallianwala Bagh, Amritsar (Where Gumbo Was, #217)

GarryRF ·
On the 2 nights prior to the massacre, Indian Government buildings had been set on fire. Telegraph poles destroyed and railways attacked. Europeans - including a female English school teacher - had been attacked by mobs on the streets. Stripped naked, beaten and left for dead at the roadside. There were no British soldiers in the town. They were all in the mountains to escape the heat. The Ghurkhas' - Nepalese Soldiers - were trying to enforce the curfew that had been imposed following the...
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Re: VisitBritain, British Air point out "undiscovered places"

Travel Rob ·
VisitBritian is my favorite official tourist info agency and what they are doing really is working .
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Re: HOW YOU CAN SAVE THE ASIAN ELEPHANT

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for sharing these thoughts. Elephants are highly intelligent animals, probably smarter than dogs for example. Wild elephants in Asia are having a hard time because of loss of habitat and conversion of their normal range to agricultural land. Most do not have ivory tusks so unlike their African cousins, they are not slaughtered for their teeth. In Sri Lanka I visited the elephant orphanage in Pinnawala a number of times, which I've previously written about on TravelGumbo at this link .
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Re: Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

DrFumblefinger ·
That's the nature of gold boom towns, PHeymont. I believe another gold vein had been found in Alaska near the mouth of the mighty Yukon River, and most of the Klondike prospectors flowed downriver to it. I've been fascinated by the Klondike gold rush since I was a school boy in Canada, reading the writing of Pierre Burton (famous Canadian author, former resident of Dawson City, whose father was one of those who came here during the Klondike Gold Rush and unlike most stayed in Dawson). On the...
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Re: Rocky Mountains in St. Ignatius, Montana

Ragengirl3 ·
author: Sierra Ragen Ragengirl3
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Re: Scotland's vote may help ax high flying tax

GarryRF ·
UK Air passenger duty for under 12's will be abolished from May 2015. Under 16's will have to wait until 2016.
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Re: Charleston's Grand Mansions: Middleton Place

PHeymont ·
I was interested to note (aside from the alligators!) the fact that the house at Middleton was never restored after the Civil War. I noted that at Magnolia plantation, not far away, a small cottage was moved in to replace the original house...and it left me wondering. While the planter class certainly reclaimed power after Reconstruction, they must have taken quite a while to overcome the economic damage they brought on themselves.
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

DrFumblefinger ·
Among my greatest photography influences were Matthew Brady, whose grainy and gritty images of the Civil War made it so very "real" to future generations just learning about it in history books. And of course the great work of Ansel Adams. Far from gritty and grainy. Truly a visionary.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#84)

Mac ·
Ah Paul, I have a suspicion that this is in the tropical land of a very good author chum of Dr. F... Looks to have Portuguese influence and defensive walls. Like PortMoresby I shall hold off further comment until I know if I am in the general area - and then I will start scratching my head....
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Re: Doors of Charleston

GarryRF ·
The very last act of the American civil war - Captain Waddell of the CCS Shenandoah (built in the UK), walking up the steps of Liverpool Town Hall surrendering his vessel to the Lord Mayor, after sailing 'home' from Alaska to surrender. The shipping offices in Rumford Place Liverpool were the Embassy of the Confederate States during the American Civil War. The CCS Shenandoah was the only Confederate ship to circumnavigate the world.
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Re: Thinking Cuba? Tickets not so easy yet!

GarryRF ·
Mac. Cuba has already changed since my first visit 15 years ago. Buses and cars are everywhere now thanks to those intrepid Chinese salesmen. Living standards are rising rapidly thanks to the tourist dollar. Fields of Sugar Cane are now rare. Castro has decided that Cuba's future lies in tourism. Bicycles prevail in most Towns and a horse and buggy are common. When I first went to Cuba it was painfully poor. It's like going back in time to a 3rd world country. But with safety and very civil,...
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Re: UKs First National Civil War Centre to Open With Huge Civil War Re-Enactment

GarryRF ·
The English Civil War will be re-enacted in Newark, Nottinghamshire England. More details of the event and photos of the Castle are in: http://www.britainexpress.com/...ns.htm?attraction=93
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Re: Oh, to be in England! Now that April's...snowing!

GarryRF ·
The weather here in northern England has cooled off - was 72f and now 50f. But its still sunny, pleasant and dry. Too dry - just had to water the flowers ! Apple Blossom in the garden - just now ....
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Re: World's most attractive libraries

DrFumblefinger ·
A followup to attractive libraries are great bookstores. Fodors just released 16 of their favorites in the USA, which you can find here . I've visited a number of these and enjoyed them. I would like to add two other stores that I know of. 1) Univ. of Washington bookstore. While mostly a student store aimed at textbooks and supplies and such, it has an excellent collection of fiction and non-fiction as well as frequent author readings and book signings. 2) Auntie's books in Spokane,...
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Re: Art, Architecture, History and More in Fun Frederick, MD

George G. ·
One of our sister agencies called the Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center was located in Fort Detrick in Frederick Maryland. I visited AFMIC a number of times and your photos of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine brought back memories. I have not toured Frederick village itself, but your story has prompted me to put it on my list of places to visit.
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Re: A Complete Guide to Buy Travel Insurance for your upcoming vacations

Dan Carter ·
Just to add a personal note to these recommendations. I traveled for years without travel insurance, thinking that I could cover or recover lost reservations, luggage, etc. but friends' experiences made me realize that the medical and evacuation coverage is the real key. And then, a few years later we had an unexpected three-week hospitalization in Europe that ended with a medevac flight back to the U.S. The hospital bill was over $30,000 (much less than it would have been at home), and half...
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Re: Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, Staunton, Virginia

JHeymont ·
While this report is interesting in one regard, I find myself disturbed by the discussion of Woodrow Wilson that leaves out so many negative aspects of Wilson's legacy. Negative enough that students at Princeton have been trying to get his name off buildings. Wilson was a racist. A member of the KKK, or at least a friend. He showed Birth of A Nation, a racist, pro-Klan movie in the White House. He segregated the civil service, which had been one of the ways that Black workers had been able...
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Re: Around the World in a Day with Coca-Cola

Travel Rob ·
Thanks Samantha! The Taste It Sampling Bar was by far the highlight for me too. I enjoyed the sodas from Africa the best. The Downtown location of the museum is great. The Georgia Aquarium is across from it, the Civil and Human Rights Museum is behind it and on the other side of the street is Centennial Olympic Park. Not to mention you're only a few blocks away from one of the great hamburger and hot dog drive-in's, 'The Varsity' .
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Re: Most of China's Wall in danger: Can it be saved?

PortMoresby ·
This is old news. Very old. Villages in proximity to the wall have been built from it's bricks for eons and the parts that people love to visit and pretend are historical are nothing of the kind, but completely newly built and Disney-fied versions for the tourists, foreign & domestic. The Chinese government, in its (lack of) wisdom has no more interest in cultural preservation than it does in playing fair in any area of endeavor. History and its artifacts are tools having no value beyond...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#117)

Jonathan L ·
Okay, it is hard to see what is in the dome, but the art work outside the dome is definitely civil and not religious. There is a seascape in one corner. So Spain or Portugal are my first guesses.
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Re: Are ATM's at European airport going to cost you more?

PortMoresby ·
" I believe the facts are somewhere in between..." PHeymont In between what? I checked for locations on Barclay's website and reported what I found. What am I missing? I'm not surprised that airport ATM's are becoming a bad deal, expected it long ago, but the assertion by the article's author that there are no machines except Travelex's appears to be inaccurate, my only point.
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PHeymont ·
Yes, that is a cappuccino with the curved croissant. Perhaps it's an indication of a closer alliance growing between French and Italian breakfasts as the UK and Britain negotiate over new treaty terms...
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

Travel Rob ·
I think they need an impartial judge, like me, to go test out both shapes of the croissant. I might need to stop in Italy for the cappuccino. And since I like yogurt for breakfast too, I might have to go to Greece and Bulgaria to settle which ones better.
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PHeymont ·
These matters are too weighty to be settled by a single judge—a panel of judges is needed. My bag is always packed... Rob...are we flying Norwegian? perhaps we can check their breakfast on the way...
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PortMoresby ·
Those straight croissants look suspiciously like the ones I see in American bakeries. Conspiracy?
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PHeymont ·
Perhaps that's a result of the U.S. and Britain sharing a "special relationship," which as Prime Minister Hugh Grant famously pointed out can be a "baaaad relationship."
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PortMoresby ·
Sacrebleu!! I'm reading an article about famous French baker, Frédéric Pichard, (best croissant in Paris 2011). I direct readers to the photo of the croissant served to the author in the courtyard of the bakery. http://www.farine-mc.com/2014/...rederic-pichard.html Could this mean M. Pichard, too, should be thrown out of the European Union?
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PHeymont ·
Sacre bleu, indeed! PortMoresby has uncovered a dirty little secret which will not go unexposed for Gumbo readers! Here is the offending baked good, which perhaps should be called not croissant but ' bâtonant.' While I would not hold its shape against it, I might hold a bit of cherry preserves against it...
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Re: France, Britain at swords points over croissants

PortMoresby ·
I feel it is my duty to sacrifice an hour while I'm in the city in April to seek out this misshapen example of the French baker's art at 88 rue Cambronne, and witness the outrage for myself. Five years ago, when judged best in Paris, were they shaped thusly? I promise to search and destroy...several, no doubt.
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Re: February 15, 2017: Sunset on Newcastle Quayside

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Tony, Just to let you know that your Newcastle Quayside photo is our POD today. This is the last of the photos I have from you so when you get a chance, pop a few more my way. Thanks,Karl From: TravelGumbo < alerts@hoop.la > To: DrFumblefinger < drfumblefinger@yahoo.com > Sent: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 3:00 AM Subject: Post By ViewFromTheChairPhotography: February 15, 2017: Sunset on Newcastle Quayside Post By ViewFromTheChairPhotography: February 15, 2017: Sunset on...
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Re: Britain's #1 attraction: The British Museum

GarryRF ·
Another "Best of Britain" survey that doesn't see beyond London. The Albert Dock in Liverpool has 6.3 Million visitors per annum - and not a mention. The Albert Dock is a UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE.
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HistoryDigger

HistoryDigger
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Sarah Towle

Sarah Towle
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