Skip to main content

Tagged With "tombs of kings"

Reply

Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

DrFumblefinger ·
Agree with PHeymont. Plan your trips around the leaf watching. Lots of pretty small towns around New England, although many will be pretty booked. I'd leave at least 3-4 days for Boston. Lots to see and do there, including many items relating to the rebellious Yankees throwing off the ties with old King George. And great museums and restaurants and such. We can get into more details if you'd like, but you'll definitely want a good guide book. Many people find a day in Salem (famous for its...
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

Paul Heymont ·
It's interesting how we perceive age. In the U.S., we have few buildings over 200 years old, while in other places buildings older than that are part of the housing stock. And here we have a building of intricate design and decoration old enough that we hardly know any of the history of its builders. A reminder to us how much there is to see and know that is beyond our daily lives. Thank you for the tour!
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
Perceptions of time ! Interesting subject. You do get a little blasé about History when you're surrounded by it. This is my local Church. It's nearly a thousand years old and still in regular use !
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Age is relative, isn't it? I guess they called it the "New World" for a reason. That's a beautiful church, Garry, and in such a lovely setting. Maybe you can share more about it with us sometime in a POD or short blog post.
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
TravelandNature. You'd be surprised at how many people have been saved by that Church. "Regulars" from hundreds of years ago still attend services and Funerals. Next door to this Church is a Pub and folks come out to catch the last Bus at Mid-night. They often see 8 Nuns in white carrying a coffin through the main doors. Which are still closed - of course!
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

Travel Rob ·
GarryRF was kind enough to take me to that church It's impressive. People just walk old walls too there like it's no big deal. I guess it's really what you're used to
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
Walking the "Walls" that enclose the City - maybe 3 miles around - is a local ritual ! At frequent intervals there are Pubs to stop at. The idea being that you stop at each one , have a drink and proceed to the next. Its only the hardened drinkers who complete the circuit. A friend from Anna Maria Island, Florida sent his daughter to stay with us for a while. Same age as my daughter and they got along like a house on fire ! So when we arrived in Chester I told her our day was walking around...
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
On my first visit to Anna Maria I was amazed that the Pelicans would sit next to you on the pier by Allemande Villas. Like a pet dog. They would try and steal your bait as you were fishing. But like a good dog they responded to a "Hey you!" and sat watching you. When I caught my first fish I pulled and fought with the monster! As I lifted my prize from the water my new Pelican friend flexed his wings. He glided off the Pier and with great precision removed my catch from the hook! He passed...
Comment

Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
For those who are interested, we received this link which has some interesting graphics of Newgrange site. http://www.openuniversity.edu/...he-winter-solstice-a
Comment

Re: Happy Thanksgiving, from all of us at TravelGumbo!

DrFumblefinger ·
GarryRF, You must try the King (Elvis Presley's) favorite sandwich. Peanut butter and banana, fried in butter. Forget about the cholesterol -- give it a go. It's much better than it sounds! Part of the joy of traveling is trying the food. Like "pudding" with your full Irish breakfast (don't ask if you don't know). I remember driving through rural southern Australia and seeing the following sign at a restaurant: "Bugs, $10". I don't know about you but I wouldn't pay anything for a plate of...
Comment

Re: Tidal Basin Memorials, Washington D.C.

DrFumblefinger ·
I just visited these memorials a few weeks ago. I was especially impressed by the Martin Luther King Memorial, which you photos do a nice job capturing the spirit of. Thanks, George!
Comment

Re: Memphis, Tennessee 2) The King's chariots

GarryRF ·
It's good to see the Elvis Legacy lives on. Does the "King" still have a following in America with younger people ? I'm amazed that younger visitors to Liverpool still want to see Beatles memorabilia. German, French, Japanese, Spanish and Scandinavian tourists and most under 40. Perhaps the fans of the 60s are too old to travel now !. A very comprehensive study of Gracelands DrF. Really enjoyed it !! Thank You.
Comment

Re: Memphis, Tennessee 2) The King's chariots

GarryRF ·
You've answered a very old question for me ! Now I can blame the "Boss" for the absence of the "King" He did visit England once - but only on his way to Germany for his Army duties.
Comment

Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo, #60

Lynn Millar ·
Aha! This one had me because it looked so familiar, but I couldn't place. Yosemite, Sequoia, King National Parks? The fountain must have been turned off the day I was there 3 years ago, because I didn't notice it. Busy sipping tea in the lobby and on the verandah, watching children Easter egg hunt? And yes there is a tennis court on the property along with a swimming pool. It's in the circle in front of the Wawona Hotel south of Yosemite. After a stop there, I had a nice walk in the meadow...
Comment

Re: Visiting Versailles

DrFumblefinger ·
Making people wait as purposeful part of the experience of Versailles....I think not. But if it is, then I want a personal visit with King Louis!
Comment

Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#84)

PortMoresby ·
If it is where I think it is, yes, the name of a saint, but in honor of a king. And that name not generally known, as I didn't know it until I did more research.
Comment

Re: Airline scheduling: Hurry up and wait, or run like crazy?

Jonathan L ·
Of course the king of "Banking" for years has been Icelandic Air. They have made their whole business plan around bringing planes from 10 different North American cities in the morning and having those same planes fly out to 10 different European cities 1-2 hours after landing. This allows 10 plane loads of passengers the ability to mix and match origins and destinations. Then in the afternoon they do the reverse run. For 2-4 hours a day the terminal is full as passengers switch planes, the...
Reply

Re: Liverpool and Manchester

GarryRF ·
Trains run every hour between the two Cities Paul. You need to add Liverpool Anglican Cathedral and the Catholic Cathedral of Christ the King. We have two.The Anglican one was the worlds largest - but I think St Johns in NY had to beat it. Speke Hall. Chester. Here's a list to peruse at your leisure. Meanwhile I'll put a reserved in my diary. http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/A...seyside_England.html Liverpool Cathedral 360' tour: http://www.liverpoolcathedral360.com/tour/ Liverpool World Museum
Comment

Re: Gibside, Tyne and Wear

Paul Heymont ·
Perhaps the most famous member of the Bowes-Lyon family was one born just a few years after the family stopped living at Gibside. Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon, born in 1900, was the ninth (of ten) daughters of the 14th Earl, married the future King George VI, and then Queen Elizabeth the "Queen Mum."
Comment

Re: Gal Vihara, Sri Lanka

George G. ·
You mentioned Gal Vihara was commissioned by King Parakramabahu I (1153 - 1186 A.D), who also built Polonnaruwa's Great Palace Complex and the Vatadage (where the sacred Buddha Tooth Relic was kept). Is there a record of the names of the master stone carvers or the one who actually built / architect the Great Palace Complex?
Comment

Re: Gal Vihara, Sri Lanka

DrFumblefinger ·
Something I've also thought about, George. And no, the credit goes to the big boss and not the people who actually do the work. So far as I know none of these crafts men -- and there must have been dozens on this project -- are known anymore.
Comment

Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#330)

DrFumblefinger ·
Here are your final puzzle clues, featuring the king of this destination. Review everything and hopefully you'll conclude that there's only one place for us to be. Good luck solving it!
Comment

Re: May 29, 2016 - Grants Tomb

Travel Rob ·
Those are great photos Jonathan! Another place I want to get to!
Comment

Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

TravelingCanuck ·
Fantastic pictures. Thanks for this look at a very interesting and amazing park.
Comment

Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

Travel Rob ·
Wonderful reveal!
Comment

Re: Blickling Estate, Norfolk

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm not sure if there's a country with more unusual old buildings per square kilometer than England. Thanks for sharing this, Ian!
Comment

Re: Blickling Estate, Norfolk

GarryRF ·
Interesting feature indeed Ian. You may be correct DrF. Here's one in Liverpool City Centre - a few miles away.
Comment

Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

Neil McAleer ·
Dear Karl - A beautiful sequence of images. I especially enjoyed seeing all the space(s) that you moved into and through and gave to your armchair companions through your fine images. Thank you. I plan to share your experience with my friend Ximena, who is planning to travel to India next year with a group of women friends. All my very best to you, Neil
Comment

Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, Neil! Your friend will enjoy India. You just need to be very careful about what you eat and drink. The Lodi Garden is a special spot within Delhi.
Member

Cali King

Cali King
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Feb 14, 2014: Alnwick Castle, Nothumberland

PortMoresby ·
Speaking as a descendant (among millions) of King John, I'm so glad he didn't succeed. You've done it justice Mac. Beautiful.
Comment

Re: The Hottest New Restaurant in Paris is...

DrFumblefinger ·
I noticed that fast food has definitely "taken hold" in Paris when I visited this past summer. There are still plenty of fine French restaurants, but seems the French, like people in many other countries, like an inexpensive, quick meal from time to time. I'm all about freedom of choice for people and am glad they have new options open to them. When in Paris, I'll not visit Burger King or McDonalds, preferring instead the cafe scene or the cooking of some of its great chefs.
Comment

Re: The Hottest New Restaurant in Paris is...

Travel Rob ·
The funny thing was this summer I spent the night at the Marseilles airport and saw people buying food like crazy at the airport Burger King.I had no clue Burger King had even exited France and the return was the reason for the buying.
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 16, 2014: Graceland's Walls, Memphis

IslandMan ·
I think Elvis touched a lot of people in one way or another, Dr F. When we visited Graceland we had mixed emotions and enjoyed the tour immensely. I am a fan from way back and appreciate the contribution he made to the music industry. I also get a little ticked off when people who maybe don't know a lot about his private life ridicule him and put him down. The man had a heart of gold and was very misunderstood in many ways. He was born poor and when he came into wealth all he wanted to do...
Comment

Re: Gumbo’s Pic of the Day, June 20, 2014: Hamburg Harley bikers, Germany

Jessica Meddows ·
Great photo! A couple of weeks ago we passed about 20 HD enthusiasts who were all German, sitting in a Burger King outside Moab in Utah's desert. Quite an interesting sight.
Comment

Re: High Atlas Bride Fair, Imchlil, Morocco

Paul Heymont ·
GarryRF raises an interesting point about how our perceptions change and differ on the age of "maturity." In Jewish tradition, a boy at 13 becomes an adult, and in older times could hold property and begin to form a family; today, the ceremony remains, but no one believes the boy has become a man. Louis XIII of France became king at 8; he assumed full power at 15, then the age of majority. His son, Louis XIV, followed the same path; at 15 he returned from exile during the revolt of the...
Blog Post

The Bovington Tank Museum, Dorset

Mac ·
Almost unsure whether this constitutes a Travel Gumbo "travel" post, I press ahead with my submission and await rapped knuckles from the Senior Gurus! But, first I will bring the big guns to bear with the help of Brad Pitt and his Sherman tank from...
Blog Post

Memphis, Tennessee 3) The rest of the city

DrFumblefinger ·
        There’s a lot more to Memphis than Graceland, although  Graceland is by far the city’s most popular attraction (which I’ve previously discussed here ).   A city of about 650,000, Memphis has a...
Blog Post

Tupelo, Mississippi. Birthplace of the King of Rock 'n Roll

DrFumblefinger ·
This is the first post in a short series on visiting Elvis Presley related sites.  I've been a huge Elvis fan all my life and my love for the man's wonderful music has not abated in the 35+ years since he died.  My brother (Ottoman) and I...
Blog Post

The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

GutterPup ·
  If you follow Interstate 275 south through the city of St. Petersburg, Florida until you run out of land, you’ll be greeted by a gentle slope of road that seemingly rises from the waters of the Tampa Bay. This...
Blog Post

The Magic Worlds of Sintra

NonstopFromJFK ·
  On our third day in Portugal, we took the train to Sintra. Sintra is such a wonderful, beautiful little town. Even walking around Sintra felt magical—just look at the city hall building, or the charming little sidewalk!    ...
Blog Post

Visiting Versailles

DrFumblefinger ·
    Among the many wonderful palaces of Europe, Versailles is said to be the greatest and grandest of them all.  It’s a  UNESCO World Heritage site  and is on almost every traveler’s list of “must see”...
Blog Post

The Loire River Valley

DrFumblefinger ·
    Many find a visit to the  Loire Valley  to be the highlight of their visit to France, as did we.   When we were planning our journey I discussed our itinerary with my friend, Wayne.  Wayne and his wife had...
Blog Post

The Medieval Fortress and Town of Chinon

DrFumblefinger ·
  There are few places in France of greater historic importance than Chinon.  You wouldn’t know that by what you see when you drive thru it today as it seems a small sleepy rural town.  You’ll see little evidence of...
Blog Post

Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Newgrange is the oldest structure I've ever visited.  It was built over 5,000 years ago (about 3,200 B.C.) during the Neolithic era, before even Stonehenge or the Great Pyramid of Giza.  It’s obvious that Newgrange was...
Blog Post

The Valley Island of Maui: 3) Central, Upcountry and South Maui

DrFumblefinger ·
 The largest stretch of (relatively) flat land on Maui is the valley between the two volcanoes, Haleakala and the West Maui Mountains.  This area is commonly called “Central Maui” and it’s here most locals live....
Blog Post

Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

DrFumblefinger ·
Quebec, like New York, is both a city and a state (or rather, a province).  It’s an island of French heritage and culture within our Anglo-North American continent.   We combined this visit with stops in Montreal and...
Blog Post

Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 13, 2013: Jeronimos Monastery

Paul Heymont ·
Sunlight and shade highlight the complex carving of this stonework at the Monastery of Jeronimos at Belem, in Lisbon. This late-Gothic style is called Manueline, after King Manuel I. It’s marked by ornate stonework, often including maritime...
Blog Post

Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan 31, 2013: Lindisfarne, the Holy Island

Mac ·
Located 2 miles from the north-east coast of England and linked to the mainland by a tidal causeway, Lindisfarne has an area of some 1,000 acres and is the site of the first Christian monastery established by Saint Aidan in 635AD when he came here...
Blog Post

Lisbon: Cheap, but Steep!

Paul Heymont ·
That’s my short take on Lisbon after two weeks there last summer. A variety of economic factors, not all connected with the Euro crisis of the past few years, have made Portugal incredibly cheap for foreign travelers—but you have to be...
 
×
×
×
×