Tagged With "Krakow Old Town"

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Re: November 24, 2016: Enger Tower, Duluth, Minnesota

Ottoman ·
Hi Garry I never thought of counting the number of steps to the top of Enger Tower for I was too preoccupied with the beautiful scenery; However, thanks to your question I did some internet investigating and discovered that apparently there are 105 steps you must walk to get to the top of Enger Tower (therefore 210 steps in total to get up and down the tower). You really don't need to be an Olympian to get to the top of Enger Tower. Although the number of steps sounds like a lot, and the...
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Re: January 20, 2017: Swaledale Barns, Muker, North Yorkshire

DrFumblefinger ·
I love these old stone barns! Thanks, Ian.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#287)

Professorabe ·
The old shed behind the boat club? :-)
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Re: Top 10 Most Beautiful Gardens In The World

Professorabe ·
Any such list would be contentious, of course. However, this one doesn't contain a single garden in Africa and this, in my opinion, is a serious omission. The Majorelle Garden in Marrakesh and the Kirstenbosch Gardens in Cape Town would be obvious contenders. There are also many more fantastic gardens in Asia - e.g. the Royal Botanical Gardens at Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
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Re: May 10, 2020: Mojave Desert in Winter

DrFumblefinger ·
Yes, Professor, an SLR. My old Canon AE-1
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#308)

Professorabe ·
Today we get to see a statue located in the town concerned as well as a chandelier. The latter is what many visitors see within minutes of their arrival here
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Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

DrFumblefinger ·
Agree with PHeymont. Plan your trips around the leaf watching. Lots of pretty small towns around New England, although many will be pretty booked. I'd leave at least 3-4 days for Boston. Lots to see and do there, including many items relating to the rebellious Yankees throwing off the ties with old King George. And great museums and restaurants and such. We can get into more details if you'd like, but you'll definitely want a good guide book. Many people find a day in Salem (famous for its...
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Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

HistoryDigger ·
Glad you're traveling again, Mac. Boston is my home town, and October is THE BEST MONTH. Where are you staying in the city? I'd walk the Freedom Trail if you're feeling up to it. Go down to the waterfront. Boston Common and Charles Street are fun places to hang out. Newbury Street is fancy shopping and also has a few fun bistros and coffee shops. The Science Museum is excellent. Plenty of seafood to be had. New England clam chowder is great if you have sweater-weather. Go whale-watching...
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Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

Mac ·
Thank you Dr. F. - wise words we will keep 1-2 hotels booked ahead and be flexible beyond that. We are really looking forward to this new 'slice' of America, I never realised that the Pilgrim fathers just named every new town after their old home towns - I'm going to be quite confused!! Thanks too Garry that looks lovely! I envy you being there ahead of us!! PS we are now on the verge of booking Cuba too and are horrified at the cost that Virgin Atlantic is trying to screw us for an upgrade...
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Re: Portland, Oregon — Part I - Eating

PHeymont ·
Not a Voodoo fan (I'm more into old standard flavors and sizes), but I'll second the Tastebud Pizza, which I had recently at another of the Portland Farmers Market locations...
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Re: Sea World gives up its killer whale shows

DrFumblefinger ·
I grow weary of political correctness. Orcas are highly intelligent animals, no doubt -- and have the "cruelty" we expect of intelligent animals (anyone who's seen them hunt a baby gray whale for hours, only to kill it, eat its tongue and let the rest go to waste knows what I mean). I never saw Blackfish, but I do recall at the old Marineland park in Southern California. The park was closed for a number of months, and the orcas got depressed. Listless, didn't eat, didn't look good. Someone...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 16, 2015: Franklin Automobiles in Tucson, Arizona

Travel Rob ·
It is amazing the different stories there are! And because of all the different car manufactures there might be truth to a lot the stories. About the horse carriages,the pictures I've have seen of the old carriages is the driver sitting on the right , especially if theres two seats up front, because a right handed person would want to use the whip with his right hand and not whip the passengers.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 17, 2015: Mdina Gates, Malta

PortMoresby ·
Mdina is one of the few places I've been that's, in my experience, unlike any other. I thought it so beautiful on my first visit that I booked a room in the closest hotel just outside this gate and spent several days exploring it and the adjacent town of Rabat. Lunch at the restaurant of, I believe, the only hotel in Mdina, the Xara Palace , was memorable, wonderful service and food and a small compensation for not staying in the 5 star hotel. Thanks for the memory, IslandMan.
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Re: Heidelberg Castle: Where Gumbo Was (#135)

DrFumblefinger ·
Nice memories of a fun place to visit. I seem to recall there's an interesting old pharmacy/pharmacist museum in the Castle. Not exactly the kind of thing you find often.
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Re: Motel 6 freshens its rooms...and its image

Travel Rob ·
The French AccorHotels owned them for a time and really made some great improvements, updating rooms and making new hotels. And those prices were the same price as their old rooms. I wonder what happened to Accors plans that they sold
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Re: Whitby - North Yorkshire Coastal Town

Amateuremigrant ·
Camping on the pig farm beyond the abbey in the sixties �� But loved it. A fine wee nugget of a port town that never seems to lose its charm - there's no room, unlike sprawling cousins of Scarboro, Brid and Filey
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Re: Portland, Maine: A Big Little City

seesaw ·
Lovely photos! I haven't been to Portland since I was a little kid on summer vacations...we often combined Portland, Old Orchard Beach and Kennebunkport. Maine looks just as pretty as I remember.
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Re: Oct. 3, 2016: Old Store & Post Office, Evinston, FL

DrFumblefinger ·
A very cool destination! I love old places like this, especially ones that still work! You don't stress it, but they have a nice display of Elvis memorabilia. Makes me wonder if he stopped by long ago when he was touring the southeastern USA>
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Re: Sept. 30, 2016: Autumn in Chicago

GarryRF ·
It's good to see a row of non-conformist trees. Like houses or Shopping Malls. The one that sticks out from the status quo is the one that gets my attention. Probably one of the reasons I like old small towns. Where the architecture spans 3,4 or 5 generations. All in a short walk.
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Re: Shunpiking Through Northern Ohio

GarryRF ·
I enjoy your journeys around " Small Town USA". The US has such a wealth of history. You should write a book so that Brits like me know where to search for new ventures - ready for my next trip across the pond. Thank You.
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Re: Berlin's Museum Island

George G. ·
Great Blog Story. I was at the Pergammon years ago and your story caused me to dig out the old photo album from the basement archives and relive our stay at Alexanderplatz and the museum visit. Thanks.
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Re: Berlin's Museum Island

Jonathan L ·
Glad you liked the story. I hope you enjoy my next pieces on Berlin
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#294)

Professorabe ·
Today we get to see a couple of statues located in the town concerned. There are many more around.
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Re: Oct. 31, 2018: Dia de los Muertos, Cozumel, Mexico

PortMoresby ·
Currently in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas. Today was full of action all around town but especially in the zocalo with students dressing up the square and themselves. Tomorrow I’m off to a couple of villages and we’ll see what a Zapatista Dia de los Muertos looks like.
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Re: Loiza - Afro-Puertorican Culture

PortMoresby ·
When I lived in PR, in Santurce between Old San Juan and Isla Verde, the commercial street that served the area half a block from my apartment on Calle Taft was Loiza Street (Appears, from a google map to now be numbered, road 37). I wonder if it was the original road from San Juan to the town of Loiza in the early days. Do you know Jonathon? It certainly goes in the right direction.
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Re: Loiza - Afro-Puertorican Culture

Jonathan L ·
Calle Loiza runs from Santurce to Isla Verde which is technically part of the township of Carolina. It currently ends at the border with Carolina, in a neighborhood called Punta Las Maria. I will do some research to see if i can find it's history, whether it actually went to Loiza, or is just named after the town.
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Re: Crashing the geocache

Former Member ·
RU thinking that we should ask in the Craigslist Community section for each town where they want to geocache ? Do the kids use that Craigslist section a lot ? That is an interesting idea. Thanks for that. Like your selfie avatar
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Re: Crashing the geocache

Former Member ·
guten abend, Janine - That is reassuring. Thanks so much ! He had also been wondering about how to use his mobile in Europe. No problem downloading some apps - too many ! - while in the uS. I think his buddies said that they have GPS on their devices. So the dogs are really good at finding the geocaches ? Our dog only finds old shoes and icky trash. I was in Germany in my college days and loved it. They say a lot has changed. The food and the beer is probably better than ever, though. Thanks...
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Re: London In 1927, Recreated Shot For Shot.

PHeymont ·
Thank you for that fascinating link! The similarities are as startling as the differences (including the freeing up of Marble Arch from its gates and stone guardians). I've passed it along to my daughter, whose teenage students were sure the other day that color films were only about 30 years old...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day: Jan. 16, 2014: Liverpool Victoria Gallery

GarryRF ·
My favourite time to visit attractions is May-June-July. Before the little monsters are released on school vacation. Liverpool has hundreds of things to do - no exaggeration ! Here's 128 to go on with http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/A...seyside_England.html Liverpool makes a good hub for visiting nearby Chester with its 2,000 year old Roman Walls and Tudor Buildings. The River Dee and North Wales. All using local public transport - mostly trains. You can get a flight, Liverpool - Dublin from...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #11

GarryRF ·
Chester is a Walled City. It has 3 miles of Battlements enclosing the Centre. The Roman Amphitheatre is just outside the City Gates. The seating was wooden. It has no raised sections like other Roman Amphitheatres. You can see the remains of this 2000 year old settlement and walk the circuit on the original walls of Chester. Tudor Buildings
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #11

Travel Rob ·
My profile pic used to be me holding up the Old Roman wall in Chester . Without me there,is it still standing? Lol I especially enjoyed seeing the Racetrack there.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #11

PortMoresby ·
All hail, IAM_NOTATOURIST. Please join us and tell us please, how the heck could you tell the difference between one arena and another? Artsnletters, same question, and the reason I suggested 3 (not 4) as possibilities. Maybe it's the age-old answer, you just had to be there. But still, I'd like to hear it from the sources.
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Re: Suggestions wanted: Andalusia

PortMoresby ·
Will you have a car? I ask, because if you will, you might consider stopping at one or more of the White Towns between Seville & Granada. I stayed a week in a house just outside Iznajar, a lovely little place, and visited a bigger town, Antequera, worth a stop. For a brief stop I'd recommend the smaller town, one of a number in the area, millions of olive trees everywhere. There is no train there although Antequera has a station, but outside the town. Below the town of Iznajar, beside...
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Re: Alfred the Great's bones found!

DrFumblefinger ·
I don't think we'll find Hoffa until they start tearing down some of these old ball stadiums... Somewhere deep in the concrete I think!
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Re: Is Porto worth the trip?

PHeymont ·
Much as I loved my time in Porto...it's NOT a day trip. Much too much to do there, including evening stroll along the Douro, port-wine tasting across the river in Vila Nova de Gaia and more. I'd say take the advice above and save Porto for another trip. Of the recommended day trips above, I'd vote for Sintra. It's an easy trip--trains run about every 30 minutes, more frequently in rush hours, The town itself is interesting, the Moorish Castle up on the mountain and the Pena Palace above that...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? # 9

GarryRF ·
How many Folk Singers does it take to replace a roof ? 3. 1 does all the work - and the other 2 hold the ladder while singing a song about how much better the old roof was.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #6

Travel Luver ·
This is pretty tough. Looks like an old bridge with strong Chinese influence. I've never been there but would favor something in Southern China or maybe Southeast Asia. Anyone besides PortMoresby ever seen this before?
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #6

WorkerBee ·
Originally Posted by Travel Luver: This is pretty tough. Looks like an old bridge with strong Chinese influence. I've never been there but would favor something in Southern China or maybe Southeast Asia. I agree with Travel Luver. It reminds me of traditional architecture in Thailand. I wonder whether the wooden structure is the same age as the stone supports or a replacement.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #6

PHeymont ·
OK. So we know it is Asian, and that it was built by colonizers/invaders from another country. Since the architecture is Asian, I think we can assume the invaders were, too. The problem then is the next term: "link them with a settlement of people from a third country." That seems to imply that the "third country" people are NOT across a border in their own land but are also in the invaded country, but living separately from the invaders. If I'm correct in guessing the bridge at upwards of...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #6

JohnT ·
O.K. So it's not in Japan or probably Malaysia or Indonesia. I think it unlikely that Port Moresby has been to Myanmar (though he certainly appears to be a very intrepid traveller). The more reading I do leads me to believe that it's most likely Port Moresby is referring to European trading within Macau, Canton, Hong Kong or perhaps Taiwan...so given that we think the bridge is...well, very old I would be leaning toward the Portuguese or the Dutch as one of the nations involved and China...
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Re: Should Wi-Fi be free in all hotels?

JohnT ·
Maybe it's the old capitalist coming out in me, but I think "should" is a strong word. Free access to wi-fi certainly helps me determine where I'll stay, just like free breakfast is...but if a hotel has enough other amenities so that people are willing to pay for it's wi-fi then so be it...although it is easy enough to get free somewhere, I don't value it enough to pay for it.
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Re: Should Wi-Fi be free in all hotels?

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by JohnT: Maybe it's the old capitalist coming out in me, but I think "should" is a strong word. Free access to wi-fi certainly helps me determine where I'll stay, just like free breakfast is...but if a hotel has enough other amenities so that people are willing to pay for it's wi-fi then so be it...although it is easy enough to get free somewhere, I don't value it enough to pay for it. I agree with you John, that market forces will drive this. But the demand for "free"...
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Re: Sedona AZ-Red Rocks rise above townscape

PortMoresby ·
Well, that's a surprise! No, doesn't look familiar, appears to be in town rather than south of town as I was expecting. Looking at a map, it says Chapel of the Holy Cross, where I thought you were, unless it's changed utterly, which it could have of course. It's been a while.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #5.5

WorkerBee ·
Interesting clues here but nothing definitive. The vegetation growing through the cobblestones might indicate a moderate climate throughout the year. This path appears to be residential and not one frequented by tourists. Maybe Mediterranean or a colonial city in the Americas. The cobblestones are on the small side and are more common, I think, in southern Europe. Also the light fixtures are a modern design and not typical of a city trying very hard to preserve the old look and feel of the...
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Re: The "Eiffel Tour" Only Starts with the Tour Eiffel

WorkerBee ·
PHeymont, Your post reminded me that I had seen a pre-fabricated church designed by Eiffel in Baja, Mexico. It is in the small town of Santa Rosalia and still in use. There is more info here .
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Re: Classic American Cars #5

Rodney Kiser ·
The car is a 1956 Ford Fairlane Town Sedan
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan. 2, 2014

GarryRF ·
After being married for 40 years, I took a careful look at my wife one day and said, "Forty years ago we had a cheap house, a junk car, slept on a sofa bed and watched a 10-inch black and white TV, but I got to sleep with a hot 20-year-old girl every night. Now, I have a £500,000 home, a £45,000 car, a nice big bed and a large screen TV, but I'm sleeping with a 60-year-old woman. It seems to me that you're not holding up your side of things." My wife is a very reasonable woman. She told me...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Oct. 30: Monet's Gardens at Giverny

DrFumblefinger ·
You wonder how many times Monet actually used these gardens as inspiration for his art -- likely hundreds. Perhaps his most spectacular pieces are the huge canvases he painted on display in Paris' Orangeria museum. These were the works of an old man loosing his eyesight to cataracts, but are truly spectacular!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

PHeymont ·
It's interesting how we perceive age. In the U.S., we have few buildings over 200 years old, while in other places buildings older than that are part of the housing stock. And here we have a building of intricate design and decoration old enough that we hardly know any of the history of its builders. A reminder to us how much there is to see and know that is beyond our daily lives. Thank you for the tour!
 
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