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Tagged With "security screening"

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Re: Mission San Juan Capistrano, California

PortMoresby ·
Rob, can you tell us what we're seeing in the last photo? PS: I love your layout seeing it on my desktop computer. A small phone screen doesn't do it justice.
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Re: Canada gets its first non-stop to India

GarryRF ·
You can take your own entertainment on the Dreamliner DrF. The large screen in the seat back in front of you also has a USB port. The Menu has a USB option and you can charge those devices you've taken with you. I also recommend Bluetooth headphones to keep all those singing babies away ! I have a selection of music to sleep to.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan. 2, 2014

GarryRF ·
After being married for 40 years, I took a careful look at my wife one day and said, "Forty years ago we had a cheap house, a junk car, slept on a sofa bed and watched a 10-inch black and white TV, but I got to sleep with a hot 20-year-old girl every night. Now, I have a £500,000 home, a £45,000 car, a nice big bed and a large screen TV, but I'm sleeping with a 60-year-old woman. It seems to me that you're not holding up your side of things." My wife is a very reasonable woman. She told me...
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Re: ANA Japan flight becomes flight to nowhere

PortMoresby ·
When I worked in a library, checking in returned books to be reshelved sometimes the scanner would beep even though the barcode hadn't actually registered in the computer. So if we didn't watch the screen, but depended on the sound, occasionally a book would still be checked out as far as the system was concerned. A long-winded way of pointing out that may be akin to what happened in the case of the ANA passenger.
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Re: Trainer for Day: Dolphinarium, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Lestertheinvestor ·
Great question -- and I should have put that in. The water was warm -- in the low to mid 80's ( Fahrenheit ). My wife is a woos, so she wore a skin (actually to prevent sun burn). You are not allowed to wear sun-screen as it contaminates the water for the dolphins!
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Re: Majorelle Garden - Marrakech

DrFumblefinger ·
Wow! The colors just pop right off the computer screen! An amazingly beautiful place and again you've given us another reason to follow in your footsteps.
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Re: Seat Wars break out in the air...

DrFumblefinger ·
I think on short domestic flights (let's say 3 hours or less), we could do away with the reclining seats. For longer duration flights, more legroom would be a great addition and keep the reclining seats. But I can't see the airlines going this route. Space is so tight I can't even see the screen of my netbook if the traveler in front of me reclines their seat.
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Re: Hotel rooms for Millennials

DrFumblefinger ·
I have seen the future. And the future has hotel rooms that are 90% bed (by surface area), 9% flat screen tv, 1% room for walking. No room for anything else. Except for the TV part, it could have ben Caligula's design.
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Re: World's 10 Best Airports? Maybe...

DrFumblefinger ·
These are all important international hubs, but I'm inclined to agree with TravelRob. Most of these airports are massive and far from user friendly. Maybe they have a large assortment of restaurants from which to choose, etc. But I like short lines, a quick security screen and a reasonable walk to the gate not requiring a bus or train to get there.
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Re: It's magic: Harry Potter boosts park profits 38%

GarryRF ·
The Harry Potter collection has also boosted the number of younger folks that are reading books. That's got to be a bonus ! Kids here in the UK say there's so much more detail in the books than the films. Got to be better than "Blob dodging" on a computer screen !
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 13, 2015: Willie Walleye, Baudette, Minnesota

Ottoman ·
Thanks for your feedback gentlemen. DrFumblefinger...I agree that walleye (aka pickerel) are probably the best pan fried fish I have ever had. To anyone who has never tried this fish, treat yourself by cooking some up yourself or try it at a restaurant. PHeymont and TravelRob, I'm glad that you also enjoy these types of sculptures. You said it well Paul...there is something "weirdly wonderful" about them. In terms of your question Rob, the reasons I'm not in any of the pictures is...
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Re: TSA, American testing automated security screens

DrFumblefinger ·
This sounds like a nice idea. A modernization of a tedious process. Hope it works!
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Re: TSA strands 450 overnight: could it get worse?

DrFumblefinger ·
What a mess. The very agency that is to protect citizens from terrorist activity is creating an environment wherein "tent communities" are springing up at America's airports. How embarrassing is that. Talk about a target rich environment for the bad guys. The TSA's funding, even with "cuts", is about US$ 7.3 billion for 2016. In contrast, Canada, which has 1/10th the population of the USA, has an airport screening budget of about CDN $0.56 billion, and Transport Canada acknowledges it has...
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Re: TSA strands 450 overnight: could it get worse?

GarryRF ·
Most countries around the world exchange ideas and processes to fulfil the common good. But some countries refuse to enter into a dialogue and share ideas. Russia is another one.
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Re: TSA strands 450 overnight: could it get worse?

PHeymont ·
To be fair to the TSA (which I find hard to do), the $7.3 billion is not all for screening, only about half is. That said, while airports are looking to outsource the screening, maybe they should hire Transport Canada! As for the PreCheck point: TSA can't seem to make up its mind. When it started, they semi-randomly selected 'extra' people to go through it, on the theory that they would like it enough to buy it—and some did, but not enough. Then the people who had paid for it started to...
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Re: TSA strands 450 overnight: could it get worse?

Travel Rob ·
The few US airports that have private security companies handling the screening are reporting good results and I think that's a good option for the airports. My guess is for liability reasons, airports are scared to dump the TSA. After seeing the comments by DrFumblinger and PHeymont, I do think we can learn from Canada on this. I did a little more reading on Canada's airport security. It seems all major airports in Canada have private screening. The airports give out three year contracts.
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Re: Celebrating Nature on 7 Continents: Encounters with an Arabian Oryx (Asia Pt 1)

PHeymont ·
Fantastic! (and a bit scary, even on screen...)
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Re: Is bad PreCheck planning responsible for TSA delays?

Travel Rob ·
I don't like the whole concept of PreCheck because when they started this added security at airports, they insisted terrorists could be anyone and that's why we need to check everyone. We enter trains, buses and metros without a PreCheck, and it doesn't take forever. There is a history of attacks on those means of transportation too. And now attacks could just as easily happen at the ticket counter at the airport as on the plane.
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

PHeymont ·
Note that the tip suggestions on the machines have a habit of creeping up. New York cab tips were about 15% for years, as a standard, and as recently as 2 years ago, a Times survey found that was about the norm. But...when you pay by credit card, the machine offers a choice of 20%, 25% or 30%. To use 15%, you have to go back one step in the process, make a manual entry, and then back to the close-out screen...all while you're trying to get out of the cab and stop holding up traffic. I'll bet...
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Re: American to drop seatback entertainment

PHeymont ·
DrF, not everyone has their own streaming service, but the theory is that nearly everyone has a screen, usually better resolution than the seatback. American is, in essence, providing a streaming service for those who don't have it. As for being small: those seatback screens go for north of $10,000 each because of all the issues involved in aircraft safety, etc. Not to mention the systems they are attached to. About $3 million average per plane saved this way, and American's order for the...
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Re: A Visit to Ireland: Part 3) Kenmare, Gateway to the Ring of Kerry

Former Member ·
This is a terrific tip ! --- For travelers with their own cars, the clockwise approach is preferable as you have the outside lane and better views all the way around and don't end up one small buggy in a convoy of huge buses. Your article makes us want to consider a trip to western Ireland, which has not been on the radar screen. The stone circles are worth the trip all by themselves.
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Re: Managing Your Money on the Road

Travel Rob ·
This is a great compehensive post. Time to try and cash the money order that you've been holding! LOL
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Re: Where Gumbo Was #4.0: Queen Mary in Long Beach Harbor, California

PHeymont ·
Don't get left out again! You can follow Gumbo on your mobile device...it comes up formatted for tiny-screen use, but if you have enough screen (most smartphones do) click on settings and choose "standard view," or use the menu to select "Desktop view."
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Re: Flood of new agents to speed up Customs at JFK and Newark

DrFumblefinger ·
About time. I routinely fly in and out of Calgary International and have never had to wait more than 15 mins for customs/immigration (both US and Canadian customs located at this airport). That should be the standard they strive for everywhere.
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Re: Flood of new agents to speed up Customs at JFK and Newark

GarryRF ·
The hold up in NY is that passengers - mostly just changing flights - have to enter the US. Then leave the US before getting an onward flight to other parts of the world. In non-US countries you can enter the International Lounge to wait for your next flight with no customs or visas. Just onward boarding card and passport. Quick and easy.
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Re: Flood of new agents to speed up Customs at JFK and Newark

DrFumblefinger ·
it's nice when the countries treat their transit people that way, GarryRF. Someone passing through. But I've had long delays with transit situations in the UK, Japan and most recently in Chile. It's unfortunately common.
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Re: Flood of new agents to speed up Customs at JFK and Newark

PortMoresby ·
In transit once at Narita, our entire onward-traveling load of passengers was left locked standing in a narrow windowless hallway, not knowing why we were there or how long it might be. Treating passengers badly is not a behavior owned by any particular nation's immigration officers, as you say, DrF. It can happen even in countries supposedly known for their politeness.
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Re: Flood of new agents to speed up Customs at JFK and Newark

GarryRF ·
You're both right of course. No one has the moral high ground on delays. When you transit an airport with several terminals you do need to enter the country first. But hub airports like Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Bahrain have all been so polite and helpful it makes you realise that there is a better way. I use Philadelphia airport now to enter the US. It rates alongside Orlando as a pleasant experience. Last year I went through passport control in Philly. When asked, I told the officer that...
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Re: More Life at the Edge: What’s in a Name?

PHeymont ·
I admit to a long fascination with the names people choose; clearly whether screen names on websites or as names chosen for daily living, they tell some story of self-reflection, just as PortMoresby's does. What, I always wondered, made someone choose to be J. Edgar rather than just Edgar (or even just John?) That sort is more puzzling to me than the screen names that shout aggression (Warrior, Conan) or whisper softly (Miss Maisie, Teatime) or are ironically self-referential (my favorite...
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Re: Takakkaw Falls, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

GarryRF ·
Really good quality photos DrF. I love looking at frozen landscapes - on a screen ! Your words about reflection jogged my memory. Ever been walking through a store and see someone you think you recognise in the distance ? And as you get closer you realise its a mirror you're walking towards ! My wife says I need glasses - but its OK - I stop before I get into a conversation !
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A Day in Chartres

DrFumblefinger ·
  If you’re looking for a nice escape from the crowds and chaos of Paris, consider heading to the small city of Chartres for a day or two.  Situated 60 miles (96 km) southwest of Paris, just an hour’s train ride from the...
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Memphis, Tennessee 3) The rest of the city

DrFumblefinger ·
        There’s a lot more to Memphis than Graceland, although  Graceland is by far the city’s most popular attraction (which I’ve previously discussed here ).   A city of about 650,000, Memphis has a...
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Cruising through the holidays

Marilyn Jones ·
    Every year thousands of passengers find out warm tropical breezes and Christmas festivities mix well aboard a Princess Cruise Line ship.  “We install more than 347 Christmas trees fleet wide. Each vessel has a showcase tree in...
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Saguenay Fjord — Deep and Long but not very Tall

DrFumblefinger ·
I’d heard as a schoolboy that the Saguenay Fjord was one of the longest in the world.  Years later someone told me the area around Tadoussac was pretty, sparsely developed and inviting.  Given a spare day or...
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Ottawa – NOT the coldest Capital in the world!

DrFumblefinger ·
Ottawa is a vibrant and charming small city — so pleasant that it’s hard to believe it’s home to soooo many politicians.  Of the national capitals I've visited, Ottawa seems the most livable to me (ie. if...
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The Valley Island of Maui: 3) Central, Upcountry and South Maui

DrFumblefinger ·
 The largest stretch of (relatively) flat land on Maui is the valley between the two volcanoes, Haleakala and the West Maui Mountains.  This area is commonly called “Central Maui” and it’s here most locals live....
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Montreal: Je Me Souviens

DrFumblefinger ·
There are many great cities to visit in Canada, two of my favorites (for different reasons) being Vancouver and Montreal.  Vancouver has one of the most breath-takingly beautiful settings of any city in the world, and I’ll be discussing it...
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Quebec — A Walled European Fortress In America

DrFumblefinger ·
Quebec, like New York, is both a city and a state (or rather, a province).  It’s an island of French heritage and culture within our Anglo-North American continent.   We combined this visit with stops in Montreal and...
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A visit to Normandy: exploring the D-Day beaches

DrFumblefinger ·
True to its history, our visit to the coast of Normandy was cool, windy and wet -- but that's how it's been for thousands of years.  Many an armada was delayed in leaving or landing on these shores because of inclement weather, including the...
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The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Volcanoes never cease to fascinate me!  Something about their massive size and primal earth shaping power appeals to my sense of curiosity and awe.  So it’s not surprising that I find Haleakala to be Maui’s most interesting place...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 1a) Colombo

DrFumblefinger ·
Preamble:This is the first in a series of posts featuring my travels to Sri Lanka.  My visits to this island centered around seeing my favorite author and dear friend, futurist Sir Arthur C. Clarke.  During every one of these visits I made a...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 1b). Visiting Sir Arthur C. Clarke

DrFumblefinger ·
Part 1a of this blog series discussed the city of Colombo.  This post focuses on its most famous resident, Sir Arthur C. Clarke   (Sir Arthur, at a desk.  An email addict, he loved the power of computers)   Much of my time in...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other. (Part 5) The Elephants of Pinnawala

DrFumblefinger ·
 One of the highlights of any trip to Sri Lanka is a visit to the Pinnawala elephant orphanage.  Pinnawala is small town just north of Kegalle, east of Colombo (just over half way on the road to...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other. (Part 3) The ancient city of Anuradhapura

DrFumblefinger ·
A great opportunity available to any traveler to Ceylon is the chance to explore the country’s rich history and extensive archaeology.  This post describes my visit to the oldest ancient site in Sri Lanka,...
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Walla, Walla: “So nice they named it twice!”

DrFumblefinger ·
What’s a Walla Walla?  It’s a Indian name meaning “many waters”.  It’s also the name of a charming city in southeastern Washington; nestled close to the Columbia and Snake River valleys, and with a river of its...
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Washington State’s Long Beach Peninsula

DrFumblefinger ·
 For most travelers, the southwestern corner of Washington state is easy to bypass.  It lies well over an hour’s drive from the busy I-5 Interstate Freeway.  The broad mouth of the Columbia River limits access from the Oregon...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 4). The Rock Fortress of Sigiriya

DrFumblefinger ·
 “You absolutely must go to Sigiriya!”, Arthur C. Clarke insisted to me during my first visit to Sri Lanka.  “There are other countries with beautiful weather and beaches, but there’s...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 6). Polonnaruwa

DrFumblefinger ·
 The eastern most point visited when touring Sri Lanka’s cultural triangle is Polonnaruwa.  The ruins in this ancient capitol are the best preserved and most varied in Ceylon and it’s well worth the effort to visit them. ...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 7). Kandy

DrFumblefinger ·
 The Sinhalese name for this city is Maha Nuvara (Senkadagalapura), impossible for the British colonialists to pronounce so they just called it Kandy.  Located in the forested foothills of the central mountains about 1500 feet (450...
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The Worst Train in the World

PortMoresby ·
The earthquake should have been a clue.  But having rather enjoyed the ride, as I have since childhood in an earthquake-prone part of the world, it didn't occur to me that it might be a warning.  I should have listened.   I'm seriously...
 
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