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Tagged With "Yukon"

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Re: Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

PHeymont ·
It's hard for me to imagine the short arc of Dawson's heyday. In 1902 some of the most important buildings were going up, obviously reflecting a future of growth and wealth—and yet, within the same year, the population shrank to an eighth of what it had been only a year or two earlier!
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Re: Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

DrFumblefinger ·
That's the nature of gold boom towns, PHeymont. I believe another gold vein had been found in Alaska near the mouth of the mighty Yukon River, and most of the Klondike prospectors flowed downriver to it. I've been fascinated by the Klondike gold rush since I was a school boy in Canada, reading the writing of Pierre Burton (famous Canadian author, former resident of Dawson City, whose father was one of those who came here during the Klondike Gold Rush and unlike most stayed in Dawson). On the...
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Re: The Dempster Highway: a Drive to the Arctic Coast of Canada

PHeymont ·
This is amazing! I'm far too adventureless to attempt a trip like this, but your pictures and descriptions make me wish I were there. And to think, before your piece on Tuktoyaktuk, I had never even thought of the expression "Arctic Coast!"
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Re: The Dempster Highway: a Drive to the Arctic Coast of Canada

DrFumblefinger ·
It sounds like a great adventure! Thanks for sharing it with us. This road trip has been on my bucket list for some time, but sounds like it's worth delaying until the road to Tuk is completed. I've heard fall is a nice time to go. Not only is the tundra vividly colored, but there are no mosquitos (frozen to death by evening frost). Know any downsides to this, Tom?
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Re: The Dempster Highway: a Drive to the Arctic Coast of Canada

Travel Luver ·
An amazing place!
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Re: The Dempster Highway: a Drive to the Arctic Coast of Canada

My Thatched Hut ·
Originally Posted by DrFumblefinger: It sounds like a great adventure! Thanks for sharing it with us. This road trip has been on my bucket list for some time, but sounds like it's worth delaying until the road to Tuk is completed. I've heard fall is a nice time to go. Not only is the tundra vividly colored, but there are no mosquitos (frozen to death by evening frost). Know any downsides to this, Tom? Yes, I would wait until the road is finished. I had to fly from Inuvik to Tuk and return by...
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Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

My Thatched Hut ·
  Dawson City owns its existence as a direct result of the Klondike gold discovery in 1896 in the nearby creeks. Dawson was founded in 1897 and incorporated as a city in 1902.  By 1898, the population was almost 40,000. It was the largest...
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MacBride Museum, Whitehorse (Where Gumbo was #362)

DrFumblefinger ·
Gumbo was visiting the MacBride Museum in the Yukon Territory, the oldest museum in the Yukon.
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The Dempster Highway: a Drive to the Arctic Coast of Canada

My Thatched Hut ·
Most of Canada is well-travelled by tourists and not off-the-beaten path. But there is one highway in Canada that is remote and relatively few Canadians go there.  That is the Dempster Highway. It stretches some 736 km (457 miles) from Dawson...
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February 14, 2019: The Lion of the Yukon

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger shares the story of Sam Steele, the Lion of the Yukon. Sam kept law and order in the Klondike Gold Fields at a time when tens of thousands of would-be prospectors descended on the region in the late 19th century.
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Yukon Transportation Museum, Whitehorse (Where Gumbo was #312)

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger visits the Yukon Transportation Museum in Whitehorse. The Museum features the history of transportation in the territory, with many examples of the machinery used to develop this wild land.
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Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger visits the fascinating Yukon Beringia Interpretative Center in Whitehorse. The museum presents life in the Yukon during the last great Ice Age.
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December 13, 2018: Miles Canyon, Whitehorse

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger visits an important site in the journey of many prospectors during the Klondike Gold Rush, the then treacherous Miles Canyon of the Yukon River.
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October 6, 2018: 'Ice and Flowers', Kluane National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger really enjoyed this work of art, prominently and proudly displayed at the Kluane National Park Visitor Center at Haines Junction in the Yukon Territory.
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S.S. Klondike, Whitehorse (Where Gumbo was #287)

DrFumblefinger ·
Gumbo was visiting the historic S.S. Klondike II, one of the few surviving sternwheelers that used to move goods and passengers along the Yukon River.
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Re: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

GarryRF ·
I would love to visit this area and see the amazing displays. Where I live the Ice Age sent Glaciers south from the Arctic Circle. Massive rocks found underground have their origins traced back to hundreds of miles further North. The Lake District and The Pennine Mountain range (through the centre of England) were carved by glacial action. Global Warming saw the Ice-Age retreating before mankind had any influence.
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Re: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

DrFumblefinger ·
We have local rocks that were moved hundreds of kilometers by the glaciers as well. For example, this local collection of rocks is known as the Okotoks erratic, and measures up to 40 m. It was transported here by the glaciers that completely covered Alberta thousands of years ago. Global cooling really terrifies me. Sheets of ice covering much of the planets land are not compatible with life in those areas.
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Re: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

GarryRF ·
Wise thoughts Dr F. Many of the life changing events in the history of this planet occur around the time of Volcanic destruction. Mini Ice Ages caused by the sun being blocked from view by the airborne ash that covered the planet. Krakatoa being the most recent eruption. 13,000 times greater than Hiroshima. So severe that the explosion could be heard around the world twice as the sound and ash travelled in all directions. Much easier to blame mankind's excesses. Here in the North of England...
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Re: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

Professorabe ·
The consensus appears to be that English wine was finished off in the 19th century by a combination of diseases and changes to the tax regime, not by a sudden cooling or anything of the sort: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...m_the_United_Kingdom The varieties grown then were quite different from today's - and the majority were lost when wine production declined, possibly for good.
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Re: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

GarryRF ·
“The Romans wrote about growing wine grapes in Britain in the first century and then it got too cold during the Dark Ages. Ancient tax records show the Britons grew their own wine grapes in the 11th century, during the Medieval Warming, and then it got too cold during the Little Ice Age. The Little Ice Age is a period between about 1300 and 1870 during which Europe and North America were subjected to much colder winters than during the 20th century ." Wikipedia refers to the production of...
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Re: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre

Professorabe ·
No, the Wikipedia article covers much more than that - and even refers to grapes being tried by the Romans in Lincolnshire. You forgot to attribute your quote to Dennis Avery and you did not quote him in full. He goes on to claim that "it isn't yet warm enough for wine grapes in today's Britain". This is manifestly completely untrue. I don't want to get into a discussion on climate change here - you clearly are in another camp on that issue.
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