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Tagged With "Thames Path"

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Re: November 24, 2016: Enger Tower, Duluth, Minnesota

Ottoman ·
Hi Garry I never thought of counting the number of steps to the top of Enger Tower for I was too preoccupied with the beautiful scenery; However, thanks to your question I did some internet investigating and discovered that apparently there are 105 steps you must walk to get to the top of Enger Tower (therefore 210 steps in total to get up and down the tower). You really don't need to be an Olympian to get to the top of Enger Tower. Although the number of steps sounds like a lot, and the...
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Re: England's Thames Path: Kew Palace

DrFumblefinger ·
Fascinating stop! As I seem to recall, George was one of your ancestors? Do I remember this correctly?
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Re: England's Thames Path: Kew Palace

PortMoresby ·
"...George was one of your ancestors?" No, though no doubt related somehow. But he is a favorite, seems kinder & more interesting than most of them.
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Re: England’s Thames Path: Kew Gardens

George G. ·
My wife Diane and I spent almost an entire day at Kew Gardens. So much natural beauty to see. We arrived from central London at the Kew Station in mid-morning and didn't leave until almost dusk. At one time our son had a possibility of being transferred to London and I recommended getting a place in the Kew Garden area for the beauty and quiet. One of my photos from Kew.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#230)

DrFumblefinger ·
Here are a few more clues to lead you down (?up) the path to the correct answer....
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #5.5

WorkerBee ·
Interesting clues here but nothing definitive. The vegetation growing through the cobblestones might indicate a moderate climate throughout the year. This path appears to be residential and not one frequented by tourists. Maybe Mediterranean or a colonial city in the Americas. The cobblestones are on the small side and are more common, I think, in southern Europe. Also the light fixtures are a modern design and not typical of a city trying very hard to preserve the old look and feel of the...
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Re: The "Eiffel Tour" Only Starts with the Tour Eiffel

PortMoresby ·
I'm personally acquainted with one of Brunel's railway bridges, the Gatehampton Bridge over the Thames in Berkshire, England. I was advised by my Thames Path guidebook that I was approaching it. There was a strategically placed bench in a meadow where I sat, had a snack and looked at it from a distance for a bit before walking under it. Not at all knowledgeable, or even much interested, in bridges I tried to get at least a glimpse of what the guide meant when it said "one of Brunel's Great...
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Re: The Worst Train in the World

PortMoresby ·
Thanks FlashFlyer. The thing about adventures like this is you have no idea what an adventure it'll be until it happens and you can't get out of it even if you want to. So, no guts required. Yes, Burma will certainly change, has already. Currently not enough infrastructure for those wanting to visit but if you've traveled in Asia you know the entrepreneurial spirit is alive & well and it won't be long, I suspect, before it will come to resemble other parts of the region. So, good news as...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo #180?

Jonathan L ·
Today's Clue, moving down the path from one section to another.
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Re: Going Underground in Toronto

PHeymont ·
I'm a big fan of underground passages (we've lost a few, gained a few lately in New York) and will be sure to check out the PATH next time we visit family in Toronto! Thanks!
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Re: Going Underground in Toronto

DrFumblefinger ·
I've visited Toronto several times during winter. Some winter days are lovely and you want to be outside, but when the cold blows from the north, you're grateful to be able to walk the PATH. Have never seen the Christmas decorations, which are lovely. Thanks for sharing this, Kai!
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Re: The Difference between Tourists and Travelers

PHeymont ·
I think it may not be all that easy to divide the world into 'tourists' and 'travelers;' the world is not really that binary, and there are many shades between them. And many of those we meet are on the path to deeper experiences as they experience more and travel more. I think of the many new travelers who used to post on the Frommer forums about their desire to 'see as much as possible' and 'do as many countries as possible' in impossibly short time allowances. Some of us who were regulars...
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Re: In Egypt: Luxor West Bank

PortMoresby ·
It sounds a perfect way to see the area, though at that hour you'd likely have enjoyed the views without me. I understand the path from Hatshepsut's Temple to Valley of the Kings is now off limits, presumably because of the incident at the temple. You're lucky to have had the experience when you did. Thanks!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#261)

PHeymont ·
Here are the Saturday clues...a little off the beaten path. Offshore from our vantage point, a ship approaches port, and outside the area we're visiting, a windmill shows that all is not in vane. Sorry, couldn't resist!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#218)

DrFumblefinger ·
Here's a pair of new photos that hopefully will help lead you down the path to discovery....
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Re: How loooong does it take to get to your airport?

PHeymont ·
There's certainly a lot of variation, as I also noted above. And sometimes the planners don't help much either, as is the case with all three of our New York airports, where the whole AirTrain concept is completely botched. At Kennedy, the AirTrain's stations are not in, but sort of near, the terminals. That means you have to drag your stuff outside, across the roadways, and then up stairs or elevator to the train. And then, you have a choice of going to the commuter rail station (about 3...
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Re: England gets a coast-to-coast canoe route

GarryRF ·
As you can see from this photo - the tow path makes an excellent route for cycling too. And walkers. No traffic or roads to cross. Friends often take their canoes for a paddle. Others just go fishing. Maybe just a walk in silence - except for the occasional canalside pub where they have a kids playground. And the ducks quacking. (No shooting allowed)
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Re: Sick of Your Credit Card Being Declined While Traveling? Visa Offers New Service

PortMoresby ·
It may be clever, but, having had few difficulties using my credit cards in some pretty off-the-beaten path places, I'd say the implications far outweigh any benefit for me. If Facebook gives me the willies, I don't even know how to describe straightforward tracking. I'm not sure avoiding Visa's service will protect my hiding places alone, but not signing up is a step in that direction.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, May 30, 2015: Boats on the Thames

IslandMan ·
very tranquil....
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Re: Max Gate - home of British author Thomas Hardy

PortMoresby ·
It was right at the end of about a week walking on that killer path, the Southwest Coast Path, and isn't SO far from Dorchester. But you don't need to be impressed, Mac, I ran out of gas just as I was leaving Hardy's Cottage to start back and instead of returning on foot, called the hotel and had them send a taxi to fetch us. But walking does put me in the mood to visit historic places. Arriving by car, which I've done with friends and in rental cars, just isn't the same. There's nothing...
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Re: A Month in Chiapas

PortMoresby ·
I think I'd have to say, probably not. Neither was perfect and we're always looking for some sort of perfection, aren't we? I am certainly, not a member of the "it's only a place to sleep" club. It's my home for the time I'm there & even on a paltry budget, I'm fussy. I liked the 1st place, in part because I had it to myself nearly the entire 2 weeks. But the bed wasn't great. The 2nd place (located on booking.com, my other favorite site) was very comfortable but the noise would rule it...
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Re: Turbulence: Is change in the air?

GarryRF ·
I cross the Atlantic 4 times a year. Pilots know where the turbulence is. They don't fly "blind". There are times when the Atlantic Jet Stream has winds around 500 mph. So if you were to fly into its narrow path you would effectively be standing still. Coming home, from America to England, Pilots choose to fly inside the Jet Stream so a 7 hour flight can be achieved in under 5 hours. Pilots can fly above or below the Jet Stream and turbulence is a manageable hazard.
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Re: Walking the Burgundy Canal

PortMoresby ·
I received Melinda's newsletter this afternoon (she of ILoveWalkinginFrance.com ), and she confirms what I mentioned above about the down side of trying to follow French paths. "... I backtracked and turned right, thinking that walking around an island would be fairly straightforward. That path ended soon after, at the end of the port, so I backtracked again and followed another path which would join the coastal path at the eastern side of the island. It did, but was so badly marked that I...
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Re: Walking the Burgundy Canal

PortMoresby ·
Every walk is different, of course, so planning, for someone like me who isn't a distance walker, is essential. I can walk comfortably up to about 10 miles with my little pack, more if I must but try to avoid it, so there's no rush in the morning to be out early. I enjoy a leisurely breakfast and head out mid-morning. I'm never in the position of looking for a place to overnight because I've reserved in advance, either well in advance or at least a day or 2, knowing where I'll be. In France...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 23, 2015: Victoria Falls - “The Smoke That Thunders”, Zimbabwe

Mac ·
That certainly brings back memories! Sometime in the late 1970's my wife and I were lucky enough to travel to Zambia and drove down to the falls from Lusaka staying at a hotel close by. The next morning we decided to follow the foot path that went down to the bottom of the falls, through the bush, well watered by the spray of the falls. It was only on arrival at the bottom that we were greeted by a large notice saying "Beware of snakes" at which we beat a hasty retreat back to the hotel!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 23, 2015: Victoria Falls - “The Smoke That Thunders”, Zimbabwe

Grand Escapades ·
I didn't know you could walk to the bottom of the falls... Must have been an incredible sight (and quite a wet experience as well...) Cheers, Gilles Originally Posted by Mac: That certainly brings back memories! Sometime in the late 1970's my wife and I were lucky enough to travel to Zambia and drove down to the falls from Lusaka staying at a hotel close by. The next morning we decided to follow the foot path that went down to the bottom of the falls, through the bush, well watered by the...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 23, 2015: Victoria Falls - “The Smoke That Thunders”, Zimbabwe

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by Mac: That certainly brings back memories! Sometime in the late 1970's my wife and I were lucky enough to travel to Zambia and drove down to the falls from Lusaka staying at a hotel close by. The next morning we decided to follow the foot path that went down to the bottom of the falls, through the bush, well watered by the spray of the falls. It was only on arrival at the bottom that we were greeted by a large notice saying "Beware of snakes" at which we beat a hasty...
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Re: Georgia on my Mind

DrFumblefinger ·
Definitely a stroll down the path less traveled. Great information and photos -- very informative and helpful. Thanks!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, May 26, 2015: The Resilience of Life

DrFumblefinger ·
Those babies are awfully cute, and I love how mom is gently sheltering and warming them with her wings. I hope you used a telephoto lens to get these photos. Otherwise you might have had a few angry geese chasing you down the path!
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DangTravelers

DangTravelers
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Re: Name Your Favorite Restaurants for Atmosphere, Past or Present

PortMoresby ·
Green Chili Restaurant, Nyaungshwe, Burma. Setting: A simple elegant house in a garden, converted to it's current use, in a residential neighborhood off the beaten path. Seating on the veranda or in the high-ceilinged dining room. Service: Like the decor, low key. Responsive and friendly. In a word, perfect. Friends from the 2nd visit. Food: The best Burmese I had in several weeks in the country. After the first try I couldn't eat anywhere else for the duration. I didn't expect to find a...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #5

DrFumblefinger ·
There are probably a million miles of hiking trails in north America alone. But not many of them are this well groomed, with borders on the side of the path, smooth surface or well made wooden handrails where it seems none are needed. Ferns imply a shaded moister setting. This looks like some kind of urban park to me, not a wilderness park. PHeymont is an east coast guy, although he gets around a lot. I don't hike there, but who knows east coast hiking trails around here?
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #5

PortMoresby ·
I don't see the stones, looks like wood along the path to me. My first thought was NYC, Central Park. Then I thought the park in Brooklyn made more sense in this context, Prospect Park. I agree it looks more like an urban than wilderness place, very tidy. So that's my best guess. I have no plans to search the internet for matching photos this go-around. So that's my thought & I'm stickin' to it.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #5

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by PortMoresby: I don't see the stones, looks like wood along the path to me. My first thought was NYC, Central Park. Then I thought the park in Brooklyn made more sense in this context, Prospect Park. I agree it looks more like an urban than wilderness place, very tidy. So that's my best guess. I have no plans to search the internet for matching photos this go-around. So that's my thought & I'm stickin' to it. In a far far away land, long long ago, there was a young...
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PHeymont ·
It's been a long path. For a long time, observers thought it was because they were committed to contactless (RFID) technology as the next step...but that hasn't advances as fast as some predicted, and it has big security issues, too. Now that MC and Visa have set down a "you must comply or you will be responsible for fraudulent charges" rule for next year, we're seeing motion. BUT...so far most issuers have been sticking to chip-and-signature, not and-PIN, which guts the whole process.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 25, 2014: Nail Art, Toronto, Canada

PHeymont ·
The nail sculpture, and especially the last picture, remind me a bit of El Anatsui's work, a visual fabric composed of commonplace elements. Fabulous! I did a little looking, and was able to find the artist, David Partridge. The work is called Metropolis, and uses more than 100,000 nails. If you drop a coin into it at the top, apparently, the coin will find a path to the bottom, making random music as it goes! Here's some more about it
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Re: From Corfe Castle to Kingston Lacy - Part 1

PortMoresby ·
I almost made it to Corfe Castle once, walking the SW Coast Path, but ran out of steam in Weymouth. That path almost killed me and I decided I was old enough to declare old age and settle for level walks along rivers and canals. And a lesson in paying attention to the spacing of those wiggly lines on the map that warn us of climbs and descents. In any case, between the re-enactors and your pictures, I think this visit is even better. Thanks so much, Mac.
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Re: From Corfe Castle to Kingston Lacy - Part 1

Mac ·
Thank you PortMoresby for your most kind comments. Indeed the coastal undulations of the coast path are a real challenge - which I have as yet to undergo....
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #47

DrFumblefinger ·
The path behind the statuary is in a park like setting. Perhaps a park? Vegetation is lush, but not tropical.....
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Re: Down by the seaside English style....

PortMoresby ·
I took a walk once along the SW Coast Path, Exmouth to Weymouth, over several days and saw a wonderful variety of English seaside towns and countryside. Unfortunately, obviously, for me, I caught a bus on the edge of Weymouth and stayed instead in Dorchester. Although a very nice town (nice walk to Hardy's Cottage), I see now what I missed. A perfect excuse, as if I needed one, to go back. Thanks Mac.
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Re: Sequoia National Park: Hiking to Pear Lake (The Lakes Trail)

PHeymont ·
You get closer each time to getting me into non-urban hiking...but how difficult is a hike like this for someone used to that kind of distance, but in (sometimes hilly) cities, but not to much off-path hiking?
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Re: High Atlas Bride Fair, Imchlil, Morocco

PHeymont ·
GarryRF raises an interesting point about how our perceptions change and differ on the age of "maturity." In Jewish tradition, a boy at 13 becomes an adult, and in older times could hold property and begin to form a family; today, the ceremony remains, but no one believes the boy has become a man. Louis XIII of France became king at 8; he assumed full power at 15, then the age of majority. His son, Louis XIV, followed the same path; at 15 he returned from exile during the revolt of the...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, March 22, 2014: Branch Bench, near Marlow, England.

GarryRF ·
Some have charm - some have wit !
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Re: Walking in England

GarryRF ·
England is covered with thousands of miles of man made Canals. They were the Highways of the Industrial Revolution. Carrying Cotton, Coal, Timber all over the country. The boats they used were pulled by horses which walked along the tow path. Every mile or two you'll find a pub to stop and relax. Maybe a meal too. I love walking by the canals. Back to nature and peaceful. LEEDS TO LIVERPOOL CANAL. This is Haskayne. 8 miles north of Liverpool.
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Re: Walking in England

Travel Rob ·
Thanks for bringing walking in England to my attention. I have been walking more when I travel (beteen cities,from the airport. etc and have found out its very hard or impossible walking in and out of some places. I gave up trying to get out of CDG airport on foot one trip. Walking does give you a totally different perspective,thats for sure.
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Re: Walking in England

DrFumblefinger ·
Like you, I love to explore places on foot. I live next to one of the greatest wilderness places in the world, the Canadian Rockies, so this is where I like to hike. It's never been about speed or conquest, though I do love to make it to the top of a pass or ridge simply because the views are so fantastic. It's about the journey. I never walk without my camera and love to stop for photos, or to watch a doe and fawn, or some quail hurrying to shelter. Often I've shared these photos on this...
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Re: Walking in England

GarryRF ·
Here's a walk that fits the bill DrF !! Follows the peaks of hills and mountains that will take you to Hadrian's Wall. 256 Miles of wilderness. http://penninewayassociation.co.uk/the-route
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Re: Walking in England

DrFumblefinger ·
Sounds fascinating, GarryRF, but also hard work. Would likely take about 3-4 weeks to complete, time I just don't have right now.....
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Re: Walking in England

GarryRF ·
Just a tease DrF ! But many of those walkways that follow the canals are suitable for travellers on bicycles and the bonus is there is no hills ! Thousands of Europeans see it as an alternate style of vacation.
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All the Tea In...Charleston?

PortMoresby ·
  Tea gardens, as the farms are traditionally known, no matter the size, have been seducing me for over a decade.  In Yunnan and Guangxi Provinces of China, Himachal Pradesh and Darjeeling in Himalayan India, in the Cameron Highlands of...
 
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