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Tagged With "polar route"

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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

Racing_snake ·
I agree it's a spectacular sight not to be missed and that there's more to Greenland that just the ice sheet. 2014 will see me on my 7th month-long visit in the last 9 years. I will again hike alone from Sisimiut on the west coast to a location north east of Kangerlussuaq (something like 110 - 120 miles) and then join colleagues doing wild goose research. By all means aim to set foot on the ground there and enjoy camping in the remote arctic landscape - being alone out there is a unique...
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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

Racing_snake ·
Originally Posted by DrFumblefinger: The world's climate has a history of change. Ice ages have come and gone. Who knows what tomorrow's weather will be, much less next century's? But I do know the folks in Greenland would appreciate a little warming there. As I look out at the snow in my backyard today, Canada could use a little, too. If you look at the rate of retreat of Sermeq kujalleq, 2012's big thaw and recent GRACE satellite data analysis on mass loss, I think warming is the last...
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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

Former Member ·
Exactly the sort of thing that I am talking about on this other thread Please Don't Shut the Shade ! The view out the window beats the movie, every time.
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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

DrFumblefinger ·
Thank you for your comment, voyager. I shut the shade if it's clouded over, but I still peak form time to time. I shut the shade when we're over the ocean or if it's dark outside. But if the flight is over a scenic place, I like to study the geography and try to figure out where I am. It's interesting, often beautiful, and I enjoy it.
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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

Former Member ·
Dark is not the end of the show. I have seen streaking meteors flash in view. There have been times when I could see a part of the Milky Way or had a view of the Big Dipper. Over the ocean, I have seen flotillas of fishing boats off of places like Newfoundland. Even at night, you can see the lights of the boats bobbing. Once, I even saw a pod of whales in the channel off of Molokai. I peek every chance that I get. You never know what you will see.
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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

GarryRF ·
The Vikings were the first to live in Greenland - they described it as a "Green and pleasant land - with pastures and animals" Maybe when we get some serious Global Warming we'll all go back with our Cameras and the latest Frommers' Guide .... Greenland - Land of the Surfers and the 24 Hour Sun
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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

DrFumblefinger ·
The world's climate has a history of change. Ice ages have come and gone. Who knows what tomorrow's weather will be, much less next century's? But I do know the folks in Greenland would appreciate a little warming there. As I look out at the snow in my backyard today, Canada could use a little, too.
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Re: Polar bears: Hard to live with, hard to escape

DrFumblefinger ·
While they seem cute, polar bears are one of the few animals that actively hunt humans as a food source. They are quite dangerous and very lethal. The Norwegian town reminds me of Churchill, Manitoba, another great place to polar bear watch.
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A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

Marilyn Jones ·
  As I left the hotel in Winnipeg I was outfitted in all my brand new cold-weather gear headed for the airport and a two hour flight to the remote village of Churchill.  I prayed my preparation for facing the sub-zero temperatures and brutal...
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Polar bears: Hard to live with, hard to escape

PHeymont ·
  If anyone thought that drunken beach revelers or soccer hooligans could make for a bad time on vacation, they may not have considered a town where the neighbors are polar bears.   The town is Ny-Alesund, on Spitsbergen Island, Norway; it's...
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Greenland from six miles high!

DrFumblefinger ·
 One of the advantages of the polar route between Europe and western North America is that on the westbound flight you generally travel during daylight.  The route takes you over southern Greenland and on a good day the view out your window...
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Polar Vortex and Tropical Dreams

PHeymont ·
The recent horrible winter weather blamed on the roving Polar Vortex may have cancelled thousands of flights this winter—but it's also led a whole lot of people to think of heading for tropical shores. A recent survey says that 21-39 year-olds...
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

PortMoresby ·
After testing my cold tolerance living in Montreal for 2 winters (note how I count the 2 years I lived there), I'm happy to witness your adventure from the comfort of my California home. And a fine adventure it is. Thanks, Marilyn, beautifully done.
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

PHeymont ·
One of the best things about reading travel blogs is getting a better, perhaps more real, view of things. All my mental images of polar bears are really cartoonish...sitting on sea ice or performing in Coke commercials, etc. To see your pictures of them, and their proximity to human habitation, gives me a different view—at the same time less exotic and more special. Thank you!
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

DrFumblefinger ·
This trip has been on my bucket list for some time. Thanks for providing the vendor, by the way! It's only weather, PortMoresby -- that's what warm clothes are made for. It's a rare opportunity to see these magnificent animals in such numbers, and so very up close. They are massive mammals, males weighing up to 1500 pounds (700 kg). They are also one of the few animals in the world that will actively hunt man for food. Lions are the other species, I believe. I've not been to Churchill, but...
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

My Thatched Hut ·
Great article. Thank you. Churchill is high on my bucket list.
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

GarryRF ·
Was there any evidence of Global Warming ? Any anecdotes from the locals? Was there anything you wished you'd taken - but hadn't ? I presume the locals don't travel south that often - or do they ? You're blog gives a fresh insight into the area - very interesting.
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

PHeymont ·
The National Wildlife Federation article I've linked HERE provides some information on your question, Garry. The sea ice on which polar bears live and hunt a good part of the year has been shrinking rapidly in recent years, leading to loss of habitat, population decline and behavior changes. They are perhaps the species most affected by global climate change.
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Re: A Remote Canadian Village offers Indescribable Natural Discoveries

DrFumblefinger ·
It is all but impossible to get trustworthy data on this from anyone. On the one hand, the alarmists want us to think the world is ending and the polar bears are at the brink of extinction. On the other, we hear polar bear populations are growing at a robust rate, like in this article in the National Post. On the one hand we hear the ice pack has all but disappeared and on the other we read articles that the Arctic ice pack is showing recovery, but not nearly as well as the Antarctic ice...
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