Tagged With "architecture"

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Re: October 23, 2016: Imam Square, Esfahan, Iran

DrFumblefinger ·
Amazing architecture! Brilliant photos, Gilles.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

GarryRF ·
Is Montreal a French speaking area of Canada or is it multi-lingual ? I've heard that French tourists have difficulty with Canadian French. Any thoughts ?
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

DrFumblefinger ·
Montreal is multilingual, although most natives speak French as their primary language. You can easily get by here with only English and it's a great city to visit. That's not true in the smaller villages of rural Quebec where you might find it difficult to find someone who doesn't speak French. Canadian French split off from continental French 400 years ago, and the two versions of the language have diverged somewhat over the years. I don't speak much French so I really can't give you many...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

vivie ·
Montreal... my hometown!! When visiting the Olympic Stadium/Botanical Garden you should also take the opportunity to visit the Insectarium, the Planetarium rio tinto alcan and my favorite the Biodome. Information to all these can be found on the same website as the Botanical Garden. Enjoy!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Vivie! TravelGumbo loves Montreal! It's such a great city!! Thanks for the tips on other things to see and do in the city. The insectarium is especially cool to see if you have kids who love to look at "gross stuff". These were some of my favorite specimens!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

vivie ·
Yes Montreal is great. Wish I could go back more often. The fun thing about these attractions is while they are all near one another, there is also a metro station nearby. Cheaper than the taxi and an experience in itself. This is only the tip of the iceberg...so much more to see and experience.
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Re: And the tallest US building goes to?

Former Member ·
The judges have chosen the "fairest in the land". I would be happy to tour both buildings. The ingenuity of architects and engineers never ceases to impress me. Some buildings that I have particularly enjoyed touring - the World Trade Center and the Rockefeller Center in NY, the dome of St. Peter's in Rome, all of St. Paul's in London, the Reichstag in Berlin and all of the small historical buildings at Greenfield Village, Michigan.
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Re: controversial architecture? - Parasol Sevilla

JohnT ·
No pics today, rainy day. So here is one from a few days ago
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Re: controversial architecture? - Parasol Sevilla

Former Member ·
Certainly an interesting "sunbrella". Wonder if they put special light effects on it at night ? The support columns seem to be very substantial. Did you happen to notice - Do the legs have a particular purpose - hiding the WC, entrance to the Metro, covering utilities ?
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Re: controversial architecture? - Parasol Sevilla

JohnT ·
The building was commissioned to revitalise the area in the early 2000's. It holds a public market now. There are multiple levels where you can sit/look out etc. Other than that I believe it is a design piece first and foremost.
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Re: controversial architecture? - Parasol Sevilla

DrFumblefinger ·
I wonder how many millions of Euros it cost? Actually, I think I'd rather not know. Thanks again, JohnT for sharing these wonderful photos of your Spanish adventure. You've set a pretty high watermark for other members to match. Have a safe journey home.
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Re: controversial architecture? - Parasol Sevilla

TravelandNature ·
Makes an attractive public space. Thanks for the great pics of your Spanish excursion, John T. Now we all want to go for the churros and chocolate.
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Re: March 3, 2019: Palacio de Valle, Cienfuegos, Cuba

GarryRF ·
Amazing find Jonathan L. !
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Re: March 3, 2019: Palacio de Valle, Cienfuegos, Cuba

Jonathan L ·
Thank you!
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Re: March 3, 2019: Palacio de Valle, Cienfuegos, Cuba

GarryRF ·
I'm in Cuba soon Jonathan - must remember to take some pix inside buildings too !
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Re: Nov. 3, 2017: Auditorio Adan Martin, Tenerife

Travel Luver ·
A rather unusual building -- nicely captured!
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Prague

PHeymont ·
Here's another odd Prague sign (although it may be gone by now, and the merchandise sold). We saw it on a large and perhaps-not-lovely street sculpture that was seeking a new home in 2003. It was also seen in a Gumbo blog a while ago...
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Prague

GarryRF ·
I always find that to see something of the history of a city you have to look UP ! The façade of latter day stores only reaches up one or two floors. But look above and you'll Gargoyles, Coats of Arms, Eagles and Shields and a thousand other pieces that tell a tale of a bygone time.
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Re: Prague: Fancy Rooftops, Flashy Facades

DrFumblefinger ·
I remember having the same feeling about Prague. A beautiful city of great architectural variety and all types of style. One of the more memorable views of the city is from up high, say from the observation deck of City Hall. The rooftops and towers are beautiful.
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Re: Doors of Charleston

PHeymont ·
To alter a trite expression so it fits here: The delight is in the details! Thanks for the great collection and for the promise of more doors in the future...
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Re: Doors of Charleston

Lestertheinvestor ·
Los Portales. Always fun to see the entries and exits of our lives so concretely displayed and yet so enigmatic.
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Re: Doors of Charleston

vivie ·
Never given much attention to doors...until now. Very nice!
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Re: Doors of Charleston

jwich ·
I love doors, too. Most of these are familiar; the first one belongs to a dear friend, now departed. On a rainy day in Charleston, I very much enjoyed the walk downtown without leaving my comfy home.
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Re: Doors of Charleston

IslandMan ·
I think a door can tell its own story too...well done, Dr F
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Re: Doors of Charleston

GarryRF ·
This on a doorway in Liverpool UK:
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Re: Doors of Charleston

GarryRF ·
The very last act of the American civil war - Captain Waddell of the CCS Shenandoah (built in the UK), walking up the steps of Liverpool Town Hall surrendering his vessel to the Lord Mayor, after sailing 'home' from Alaska to surrender. The shipping offices in Rumford Place Liverpool were the Embassy of the Confederate States during the American Civil War. The CCS Shenandoah was the only Confederate ship to circumnavigate the world.
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Re: Medieval Meandering in Ghent, Belgium

DrFumblefinger ·
It's an amazingly beautiful town, Marilyn! Thanks for sharing this with us. Brilliant photography!!
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Re: Nov. 8, 2018: Milano Centrale railway station

PHeymont ·
Actually, in passenger traffic, it's listed here as #8 in passenger traffic. Perhaps it's #1 in mainline traffic? Certainly #1 Gare du Nord and Gare de Chatelet, both in Paris, have heavy concentrations of commuter and regional passengers.
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Re: Homes of Leadville

GarryRF ·
A wonderful display of Architecture from bygone times. I love the way colours have been woven into the fabric of the buildings. Do many American (inc Canadian ) people define eras of History by the reigning Monarch of the time ?
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Re: Homes of Leadville

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Garry. Regarding your comment, I think the Victorian era was one that was "special" in world history. It was a time when the sun never set on the British empire and the British influence on the world (mostly good in my opinion -- a common language, parliamentary goverance, etc) was at its peak. I don't think we'll have an Elizibethian II era nor a Charles era.
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Re: Homes of Leadville

PHeymont ·
I think for the U.S., Victoria is pretty much it. We've often shared styles, but what is referred to in England as Regency is usually called Federal here. You might make an association between your Georgian and our 'Colonial.' Certainly no post-Victorian styles here are associated with reigning monarchs. I wonder what sort of style might be associated with Edward VIII... well, maybe not!
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Re: Homes of Leadville

GarryRF ·
Before its founding in 1793, Danville was a huge tobacco producer when no other crop would succeed except the “Bright Leaf” tobacco which made Danville tobacco one of the most sought after varieties and top tobacco producing areas in the world. Competing tycoons built many homes along Main Street trying to one up each other. As a result, Danville’s Millionaires’ Row of homes became a symbol of Victorian and Edwardian architecture in the early United States. George G.
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Re: March 6, 2016: CCNY Grotesques

GarryRF ·
"The terra cotta gargoyles (animal-like) and grotesques (humanlike) have chipped and flaked. Some fell from their parapets and smashed into a thousand pieces." - NYTimes. http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09...ed-city-college.html
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Re: March 6, 2016: CCNY Grotesques

Jonathan L ·
Thanks for the article Garry. I am planning a longer piece on CCNY and will use the info.
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Re: Jan. 16, 2017: Mission Inn, Riverside, California

California Girl ·
Thanks for sharing that site. I have lived in Southern California just about my whole life and never knew of this wonderful place.
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Re: Jan. 16, 2017: Mission Inn, Riverside, California

DrFumblefinger ·
It is a very pretty place to visit or stay at. Here's a link to some outside photos of the Mission in from a prior post on TravelGumbo.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 11, 2013: Frank Lloyd Wright's Rookery Lobby

Former Member ·
Talk about your Do Over ! What a great lobby. We will definitely try to take a tour of the rookery when we are in the area.
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Re: Gallery. The Getty Villa. 1) The facility

Travel Rob ·
Great photos! Is the cafeteria still in the courtyard? My love of art museums began as a teenager with the Getty in Malibu.Although i've seen a lot of museums since ,it really does rank right up there with the worlds best.
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Re: Charlottesville, Virginia: Land of Presidents

GarryRF ·
I've spent many days exploring the early times of the Du Pont family around Delaware and Pennsylvania. Explore the old homes and gardens of the American chemical giants. Really fascinating. Chateau Country Route 52 passes thru Delaware’s Chateau Country. Many DuPont homes and estates are tucked away in the areas surrounding Greenville, Delaware and Centerville Delaware. Local residents have managed to preserve the rural character of Route 52 by controlling development. Twin Lakes Brewing...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

DrFumblefinger ·
 Montreal is one of Canada's great cities and one of North America's oldest.  It offers many fun things to see and do and, of course, wonderful food to be enjoyed as Montreal is Canada's capital of cuisine.   One of the more interesting...
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Chicago — City of Skyscrapers & Cloud Gate

DrFumblefinger ·
Like the monolith in Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke’s monumental film, 2001: A Space Odyssey, “Cloud Gate” looks like an alien object dropped onto a terrestrial landscape (not the African Savannah, but rather into...
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Cologne Cathedral, Germany. Where Gumbo Was #83

DrFumblefinger ·
    Gumbo was visiting the magnificent Cathedral in Cologne, Germany.  The puzzle destination was recognized rather quickly by Roderick Simpson -- congratulations Roddy!      I first saw Cologne’s Cathedral on a...
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Doors of Charleston

DrFumblefinger ·
Besides enjoying grand panoramas of a city, I think it's good to look at the smaller things, too.  It's often these that makes a place interesting and reveal a lot about its character.  Details of architecture are among these facets,...
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Vienna: Try a walk on the ugly side

PHeymont ·
Think Vienna, and you usually come up with images of cafes with pastry and chocolate, of music and stately buildings...of maybe Harry Lime and The Third Man. But ugly? That's not usually in view.   But it's there, and a new walking tour for...
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Nov. 3, 2017: Auditorio Adan Martin, Tenerife

Ian Cook ·
Ian Cook shares some beautiful images and the history of the beautiful modern opera house in Santa Cruz.
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May 24, 2017: Seattle Central Library, Washington

Samantha ·
A visit with Samantha to Seattle's architectural and cultural gem.
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The Painted Lady, Reidsville, GA

Travel Rob ·
Travel Rob travels to Reidsville, Georgia to show you Georgia Folk Victorian Architecture
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Surprising Destination: Batumi, Georgia

Lestertheinvestor ·
LestertheInvestor visits a Black Sea resort city popular with Russians and filled with unusual art and buildings.
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Medieval Meandering in Ghent, Belgium

Marilyn Jones ·
    The best way to see Ghent, Belgium is on foot and so there I was; following Mark, a local tour guide hired by AmaWaterways to guide a group of cruise passengers through the streets of this beautiful medieval city.    ...
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Prague: Fancy Rooftops, Flashy Facades

PHeymont ·
Every city has memorable buildings and unusual architectural details, but I can't think of another city with such a wealth and variety as Prague. I was struck by it on my first trip a dozen years ago, and this summer's trip reinforced the impression....
 
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