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Halifax's Seaport Farmer's Market

 
Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market is the oldest continuously operating farmer's market in North America, originating a year after Halifax was founded, in 1750.  For over 250 years the market has sold meat and produce delivered from Acadian farms in the Annapolis Valley and elsewhere in Nova Scotia.

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The Market has operated in several locations across the city since its inception, including within the Keith's Brewery Building.  In 2010 The Market moved into a converted warehouse along the Halifax Seaport and today hosts over 250 vendors! 
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We spent more than a day exploring the waterfront area and made several stops at this market.  Our visit to Halifax was during the early fall so the produce available reflected the season -- apples, peaches, plums and such.  While there are many fresh and prepared food options from which to chose, this market seems much more craft oriented than your typical farmer's market.  In part this may be to cater to the cruise ship crowds that flood the place whenever one of the monstrous ships docks.  Most cruisers would be far more interested in souvenirs than in fresh produce.

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Still, the Market was a pleasant and interesting place to visit and in a comfortable and spacious building.  Well worth stopping by!

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Here's a little more of what we saw at Seaport:

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(A tribute to Samuel Cunard sits near the Market)

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(The Bluenose II was cruising past the Market, as it does when in Halifax)

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Twitter: @DrFumblefinger

"We do not take a trip, a trip takes us".  John Steinbeck, from Travels with Charlie

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I'm a Brit who's never tried Maple Syrup. Canadians tell me I don't know what I'm missing. Brits who have tried it tell me it's way too sweet. We only see it in the stores when they have an American Produce Week. (We still see Canada as an American Country). After 2 weeks its all cleared at a reduced price because it's unsold.

So apart from Pancakes what does it taste good with ?

GarryRF posted:

I'm a Brit who's never tried Maple Syrup. Canadians tell me I don't know what I'm missing. Brits who have tried it tell me it's way too sweet. We only see it in the stores when they have an American Produce Week. (We still see Canada as an American Country). After 2 weeks its all cleared at a reduced price because it's unsold.

So apart from Pancakes what does it taste good with ?

Maple syrup is sweet, but not nearly as sweet as the other syrups you buy for pancakes (eg. Aunt Jemima, Buttersworth).  And it has a very rich and interesting taste that I enjoy.  You use it for anything you'd use a syrup for -- pancakes, waffles, french toast.  I like it over vanilla ice cream.  Commercially it is used to make maple candies, baked goods (eg. tarts, pies, cookies) and so on.  Anything you could use sugar for you can use maple syrup for if you wanted, more or less.

It is pricey, but Costco sells it at a good price in both Canada and the USA.

Of note, I'm doing research for a trip to Alaska and apparently they sell birch syrup there.  Never tried it before but I'll report back on it when I have.  Has anyone out there got any experience with birch syrup?

Twitter: @DrFumblefinger

"We do not take a trip, a trip takes us".  John Steinbeck, from Travels with Charlie

GarryRF posted:

Who's Aunt Jermima ?  Maple Syrup sounds like a a swop for Honey on the things that we have. Thanks K.

Much thinner than honey and less sweet, with a different taste, but yes, the same idea.

Here are America's popular syrups....Aunt-Jemima-vs-Mrs-Butterworth-Syrup

Twitter: @DrFumblefinger

"We do not take a trip, a trip takes us".  John Steinbeck, from Travels with Charlie

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