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Tagged With "Beagle Channel"

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Re: Greenland from six miles high!

Former Member ·
Dark is not the end of the show. I have seen streaking meteors flash in view. There have been times when I could see a part of the Milky Way or had a view of the Big Dipper. Over the ocean, I have seen flotillas of fishing boats off of places like Newfoundland. Even at night, you can see the lights of the boats bobbing. Once, I even saw a pod of whales in the channel off of Molokai. I peek every chance that I get. You never know what you will see.
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Re: Gallery: St. Lawrence Market. 2) Seafood and the rest

DrFumblefinger ·
The "Peameal bacon" sandwich has received a lot of attention on a number of the Food Channel shows. If you like the taste of bacon, you'll certainly love the sandwich. The cornmeal on it has a minor impact on its taste.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#77)

Roderick Simpson ·
More specifically, I think the first picture shows Toronto Island Airfield, and the second the mainland end of the Western Channel.
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Re: Twitter Changing it's Website

DrFumblefinger ·
And if you have a Twitter account and would to connect with us, please do so by clicking on the blue Twitter button just to the right of this comment on our social media toolbar. Or connect with us using any of our other Social Media platforms like Pinterest and Facebook. We also have a new YouTube channel. Not that much uploaded yet, and it's not Best Picture Academy award quality, but it's intended to give you a feel for travel to different places from they eye of a fellow traveler. Want...
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Re: Portland Bill Revisited: Pictures from a small island

Mac ·
PortMoresby is very right DrF, Chesil Beach is a 'shingle' beach is 29 kilometres (18 mi) long, 200 metres (660 ft) wide and 15 metres (50 ft) high - and pretty steep too!! The 'shingle' (large round pebbles) varies from pea-sized at the north-west end (by West Bay) to orange-sized at the south-east end (by Portland). It is said that smugglers who landed on the beach in the middle of the night could judge "exactly where they were" by the size of the shingle. The beach has been the scene of...
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Re: Exploring the Patagonian Fjordlands: Wulaia Bay

GarryRF ·
It's always good to see a piece of Nature that hasn't been spoiled by man's involvement. Two in harmony. Nice presentation DrF.
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Re: Mouz 066

Paul Heymont ·
Not only was that a wonderful video, but right after it on the channel is a great 1958 video on the Metro and the workers who keep it running (and it looks just as I remember from my first time in 1960), and then an 11 minute video featuring street scenes of Paris 1955. Beyond wonderful...
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Re: The ART of Chocolate: Brussels, Belgium

Paul Heymont ·
Originally Posted by GarryRF: The French lay no claim to inventing "Frites". The French blame the Belgians for the bulk builder even though they serve it with Mayonnaise - not ketchup ! Is it only Americans who call them French Fries ? There's a lot of "who gets the blame" going around. What we call a "Danish," the Danes call "Wienerbrod" or Viennese Bread; "French Dressing" is nowhere to be found in France. At least the Wienerschnitzel really lives in Wien (unless it's an L.A. hotdog.) And...
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

Paul Heymont ·
Just to add a note: on our way to Mont-Saint-Michel this morning, we noticed signs pointing to a Deutschesoldatenfriedhof, or German Soldiers' Cemetery. Curiosity took us to it and we were surprised by its story. It was constructed in 1961 for reburial of soldiers who had been buried in small locations all over Normandy, the Channel Islands and other nearby areas. It is a solemn place, and quiet, and the spirit expressed in the signs and in the design was one of reconciliation and hope for...
Blog Post

The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

GutterPup ·
  If you follow Interstate 275 south through the city of St. Petersburg, Florida until you run out of land, you’ll be greeted by a gentle slope of road that seemingly rises from the waters of the Tampa Bay. This...
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Steamboat Rock, Washington — Wildflowers and Vistas galore!

DrFumblefinger ·
 The large basalt mass of Steamboat Rock is a distinct landmark in Central Washington state.  Steamboat Rock State Park is a dozen miles southwest of the massive Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River. The Park is on a peninsula...
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Slow TV Comes to the Travel Channel

Travel Rob ·
A live 12 hour road trip will air Friday, November 27, at 9 a.m. ET on the Travel Channel. The BBC of the UK has also commissioned a series of programs doing away with commentary, script or drama.   This format is called Slow TV. It became...
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Solo Travel: Four unexpected essentials

thepoormadonna ·
I like to think of myself as an international badass seasoned solo traveller. It is my preferred way to see the world. For me, there is nothing more cathartic than knowing I can survive without anyone — knowing that my own company is enough....
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Can Channel Ferries survive new rules?

Paul Heymont ·
A few weeks ago, we wrote about the continuing popularity of the Channel ferries between Britain and the continent ( HERE ) Now a new issue has made the outlook less clear. The British Competition and Markets Authority has ordered Eurotunnel to either...
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Major Cruise Lines Expanding Adventure Travel Options

Travel Rob ·
According to a George Washington University study,adventure travel is a $263 billion market that is growing at a rate of 65% annually .Major cruise lines are jumping on the trend by expanding their adventure travel options.   Princess Cruises,...
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Gumbo’s Pic of the Day, May 8, 2015: Portland Bill lighthouse at dusk

Mac ·
On the isle of Portland in Dorset, England, the tip of the isle 'Portland Bill' and nearby Chesil Beach are the graveyards of many vessels that failed to reach Weymouth or Portland Roads. The Portland Race is caused by the meeting of the tides between...
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Gumbo’s Pic of the Day, May 22, 2015: The Lower Lighthouse, Portland Bill

Mac ·
As early as 1669 Sir John Clayton was granted a patent to erect a lighthouse on Portland Bill, Dorset, England to warn seafarers of the perilous currents that converge around 'the Bill', but his scheme fell through and it was not until early in the...
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Tired of the snow?? You ain't see nothing yet

DrFumblefinger ·
  The northeastern part of North America has been hit with heavy snowfalls this year and most residents are likely tired of the shoveling and challenging driving.  But this is nothing yet compared to the snowfall you find in some places, the...
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The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

GutterPup ·
By JP Chartier If you follow Interstate 275 south through the city of St. Petersburg, Florida until you run out of land, you’ll be greeted by a gentle slope of road that seemingly rises from the waters of the Tampa Bay. This...
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October 23, 2017: Amphicars

DrFumblefinger ·
The first commercially designed vehicle to be driven on both land and water, Amphicars had limited success when they were produced in the mid-20th century. They are now highly sought after collectibles.
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Seeing the World's Game at a Local Stadium - Palermo Football

Jonathan L ·
A longtime soccer fan, Jonathan L has an exciting afternoon sitting with the locals at an important game in Palermo.
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Svartisdal, Norway, Part 2

Amateuremigrant ·
Bob Cranwell continues his tale of visits to the Svartisdal region in Norway, and some of the potential perils of hiking around this beautiful piece of geography.
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Reindeer migration: Norway's latest 'Slow TV' hit

Paul Heymont ·
A herd of slow-moving reindeer, headed for summer pasture, are the latest star's of Norwegian public televisions series.
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Apr. 20, 2017: World's Longest Train Journey?

GarryRF ·
A new rail route provides the first-ever direct service between England and eastern China.
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Svartisdal, Norway, Part 1

Amateuremigrant ·
Bob Cranwell shares wonderful travel memories of camping in the Norwegian backcountry, in the shadow of a great glacier!
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June 23, 2017: The Shortest River in the World!

Ian Cook ·
A sign in Cassone near Lake Garda reads – in English as well as Italian, German and French – “River Aril, 175 meters, the shortest river in the world”.
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National Railway Museum, York, England.

Paul Hunter Landscape Tog ·
Paul Hunter visits the National Railway Museum in York, England. Check out its impressive exhibits!
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July 5, 2017: Cambridge American Cemetery

George G. ·
George G shares a visit to the Cambridge American Cemetery, the only permanent World War II Memorial in the British Isles.
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Channel Tunnel sets new records

Paul Heymont ·
The 'Chunnel' has left its rocky start way behind and is doing record business.
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Beldi Hill Lead Mine, Swaledale North Yorkshire.

Ian Cook ·
Ian Cook takes us on a journey into Britain's industrial past: the remains of a 19th century lead mine.
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Delta tries video chat for customer service

Paul Heymont ·
Delta's next tech innovation is a test of a new video chat system for customer service, being tried out at Washington's Reagan National.
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Hook of Holland rail link re-opens

Paul Heymont ·
Rail service is running again between the Hook of Holland ferry terminals and the world...but it's only a metro stop now.
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Ferry operators look to the future

Paul Heymont ·
The major ferry operators serving routes among the British Isles and Europe are investing in new ships and see a growing business.
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Castles on the Rhine

Paul Heymont ·
Pheymont cruises down the Rhine and considers why it has so many castles.
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Hope, Alaska: Gold, Salmon and more

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger visits Hope, Alaska. Site of the first Alaska gold rush, the town is small but many of the gold-era mining buildings survive. Thousands of pink salmon were migrating upstream to spawn, a sight DrFumblefinger will always remember.
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A Final Walk in Tierra del Fuego National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger explores Lapataia Bay. The southern end of the PanAm highway is located here, and the Bay is within a stone's throw of the Chilean/Argentinian border, a border that has long been disputed.
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day. September 13, 2013: Palouse Falls State Park, Washington

DrFumblefinger ·
Palouse Falls is a beautiful 200′ (60m) waterfall in southeastern Washington state, situated in the rolling grasslands, wheat fields and eroded lava formations of the Palouse.  I enjoy exploring this region, especially in the...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, November 9, 2015: Queen Charlotte City, Haida Gwaii

DrFumblefinger ·
    I don't recall where I've spent most statutory holidays, but I do remember the one I spent in Queen Charlotte City because it was the wettest I've encountered.  It rained and misted all day, although there were a few short breaks...
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Unwilling Travel: 75th anniversary of Dunkirk evacuation

Paul Heymont ·
May 27, 1940—75 years ago today—was the first day of the evacuation of Allied (mostly British) troops from the French port of Dunkirk across the English Channel to Dover and other British ports. Over nine harrowing days, nearly 350,000...
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Eurostar, Eurotunnel, ferries shut by sailor protests

Paul Heymont ·
Striking ferry workers stand behind their burning barricade near Calais   No channel ferries, no Eurostar trains and no Eurotunnel shuttle services this afternoon, as protesting French sailors shut down the ferries and swarmed onto tracks leading...
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Trouble Now on the British Side of the Eurotunnel

Travel Rob ·
British police kept  "Pro- Migrant" and "Britian First" groups apart as they both rallied on Saturday in Folkestone, near the entrance to the British side of the Channel Tunnel. The pro-migrant protesters marched carrying signs reading...
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Britain and France Reach Security Deal on Calais

Travel Rob ·
  Sir Richard Branson crossing the English Channel Photo: WikimediaCommons, Peter Shaw   A security and policing deal was made between France and Britain to stop the flow of migrants into the UK from Calais. They agreed upon more...
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For railfans: London-Paris train to the past

Paul Heymont ·
1997 Golden Arrow special                 Photo: Oxyman / Wikimedia   For railfans, and for nostalgic travelers in general, this fall brings an opportunity to relive the days of the boat trains and ferry...
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Fort Hancock NJ - Where Gumbo Was (#131)

Jonathan L ·
Entrance to Mortar Battery Congratulations to TravelingCanuck who guessed that this week Gumbo was "down the shore" in New Jersey, visiting Fort Hancock. Fort Hancock is a decommissioned military base that sits in the Sandy Hook National Park. The...
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Old Law Beacons, Guile Point, Northumberland, UK

Ian Cook ·
    Seen across the estuary by most when they visit the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, the Old Law Beacons stand at the tip of a sandy spit on the south side of the entrance to Holy Island Harbour. Vessels entering the harbour lined up the two...
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France to Send 120 Extra Police to Secure Channel Tunnel

Travel Rob ·
France is sending 120 extra police to Calais to help secure the Eurotunnel . The announcement came after Eurotunnel announced 2,000 migrants had tried to get into the tunnel terminal on Monday, and 1,500 had tried on Tuesday. 9 migrants...
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Suez Canal Opens With Celebrations

Travel Rob ·
            Photo by PortMoresby: Car Ferry, Suez Canal   The Suez Canal inaugurates its major extension with celebrations. They are opening a 35km parallel channel to the...
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Robert Redford narrates Travel Channel, Park Service videos

Paul Heymont ·
Robert Redford, an actor long associated with outdoor and environmental issues, is taking on new roles as a narrator for outdoor documentaries, starting with a role as narrator of Travel Channel's new series, America the Beautiful, which premieres...
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Cruise lines drop Houston as a cruise port

Paul Heymont ·
The two cruise lines that have been sailing from Houston's cruise port have cancelled plans to use the port after the middle of next year. The port has been open since 2013, after a $100 million renovation. Local officials had hoped that it would be...
 
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