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Tagged With "cobble stone"

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Re: January 20, 2017: Swaledale Barns, Muker, North Yorkshire

DrFumblefinger ·
I love these old stone barns! Thanks, Ian.
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Re: Heidelberg Castle: Where Gumbo Was (#135)

PortMoresby ·
I'm interested in the darker stone or brick construction right in the center of the top photo. Did I miss a reference to it or is it an illusion?
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 5, 2015: Stone Gingerbread House

TravelingCanuck ·
I love stone houses like this one. There was one, on a much smaller scale, in my hometown that was right on the waterfront. @PHeymont - it is listed for a mere 11 million. http://www.zillow.com/homes/fo...4.039602_rect/18_zm/ “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” – St. Augustine
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #11

WorkerBee ·
Is there someone here that knows about the stones that we can see in the structure? We want to know what type of stone was used and where it was quarried.
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Re: London In 1927, Recreated Shot For Shot.

PHeymont ·
Thank you for that fascinating link! The similarities are as startling as the differences (including the freeing up of Marble Arch from its gates and stone guardians). I've passed it along to my daughter, whose teenage students were sure the other day that color films were only about 30 years old...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? # 9

PHeymont ·
Well, nothing "Thais" us together like a good puzzle! But alas, this one did not last to the weekend. WorkerBee, our puzzle champion started homing in by e-mail on Wednesday, with an inspired but wrong guess: Once again Gumbo is taking time to visit a church. This church is made of wood on a base of stone. The location is near Barsana (Birsana) in Maramures county, Romania. By Thursday, he had continued his research, and last night he was back with another e-mail, and he had nailed it. On...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #6

WorkerBee ·
Originally Posted by Travel Luver: This is pretty tough. Looks like an old bridge with strong Chinese influence. I've never been there but would favor something in Southern China or maybe Southeast Asia. I agree with Travel Luver. It reminds me of traditional architecture in Thailand. I wonder whether the wooden structure is the same age as the stone supports or a replacement.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #5.5

Former Member ·
Worker Bee - This does look a lot like the medieval lanes of Rhodes. Except - Those southern European spots do not usually have tidy postboxes and glossy wooden doors. The lane is well kept and recently repaired. I agree that it is a proper residential area. While the overall feel is something Spanish or Italian, because of the postbox and tidiness, I am thinking Kilkenny, Lyon, Quimper or even Brighton. The stone ( is that stone ?) used in that recent doorway lintel is similar to the...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#128)

Travel Rob ·
There are some subtle clues above in the original photo, if you look close. I'll add a photo tomorrow. I can tell you this building looks very different, depending on where you are standing, and that's true for both the inside and outside of it. There's a lot of glass, metal, stone and wood that were used in the construction.
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Re: Crackpot Hall, Yorkshire Dales

Amateuremigrant ·
Great memories of the aul country ! (B Huddersfield) Look at the masonry, consider how far the stone mason had to come and go !
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#234)

George G. ·
A cannon and a symbol in stone to add more information for those still seeking the answer.
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Re: A Visit to Lovely Lake Orta

George G. ·
One of my favorite Lake Orta photos leading down to a stone boat dock.
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Re: Rila Monastery: The Gem of Bulgaria

PHeymont ·
The striped pattern an archways remind me of what you see in the Mezquita in Cordoba, Spain. In Cordoba, the earlier portions get their color from different colors of stone, and the later ones were painted. Which way is it at Rila? Thanks for the view!
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Re: Montmartre Cemetery, Paris

PHeymont ·
I noticed that...but for me, the hardest moment of the afternoon was the sense of relentless mortality I felt at the grave of Louise Weber, "La Goulue." To look at the severe and confining stone box, and think at the same time of the image we carry of her...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 17, 2014: Cobble Stone Square in Aix-en-Provence

PHeymont ·
Aix is a favorite with us, even though we've spent only limited time there...but long enough to have posted a Picture of the Day featuring the local market , not far from the scene of your picture...it's really a great walking town.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 17, 2014: Cobble Stone Square in Aix-en-Provence

DrFumblefinger ·
An evocative image, Islandman, and no -- I can't think of any place this could be but France. Thanks for sharing the photo and the story behind it!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 17, 2014: Cobble Stone Square in Aix-en-Provence

Travel Rob ·
You sure captured France!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, June 17, 2014: Cobble Stone Square in Aix-en-Provence

HistoryDigger ·
Draws me in...and back to my days in Provence, too many years ago. Thanks for the reminder of France's southern beauty.
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Re: Mont-Saint-Michel: Like no other (Pt. 2)

PortMoresby ·
A visit to this church, almost exactly 30 years ago, is one of my fondest travel memories. I stayed on the island and went to mass, it was a dark and stormy night (really), the wind howled, we were welcomed in English, the only visitors present in the small congregation and I've never felt so included as a traveler. Part of what I remember was a distinct dip worn into the stone of the stairs on the climb into the church. It appears from the beautiful photo at the top of this page that the...
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Re: Summer Solstice at Stonehenge 2014

GarryRF ·
Its good to see 37,000 people being able to enjoy the day without the need for the "Boys in Blue" taking control. There are many Stone Circles across Europe. Do they have the same draw on the locals I wonder ? Great photos that I think have caught the "flavour" of the day. Thanks !
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Re: A Visit to Ireland: Part 12) the Valley of the Boyne

PHeymont ·
The starkness and solidity of the stone ruins brings both transience and permanence to mind...and a sense of how small a space our years occupy on a long scale. Thanks for such strong images!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, February 25, 2015. St. Augustine, Florida

Travel Rob ·
The dining hall at Flagler College(in your last photo) is really something to see. The Tiffany Windows are incredible.I also love the concrete used to build Flagler college , former Hotel Ponce de Leon , made from the local coquina stone.
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Re: Enjoying the Wonderful Sites in Zacatecas, Mexico

DrFumblefinger ·
It's a great tour of a great city. That cathedral is fabulous and the color of the stone used in construction is perfect for a church. Thanks, Tom!
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Re: Enjoying the Wonderful Sites in Zacatecas, Mexico

PHeymont ·
Great pictures. The stone and your composition make many of the buildings seem more natural than man-made!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#124)

HistoryDigger ·
Could it be an old stone mill? Hmmm? Pennsylvania? Or? Lemme think...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#124)

HistoryDigger ·
Old Stone Mill at the New York Botanical Garden? Could that be it?
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Re: Florida warned: take action against future flooding

DrFumblefinger ·
The issue of what we can do about the "world's changing climate" aside, when I look at a massive stone structure like the one in the photo and realize it's sitting essentially on a sand bar (which is what most of Florida is), I'm not surprised that it might actually be slowly settling and sinking. Just like Venice is. Venice has serious problems but these are mostly due to the fact that the entire city is sinking.
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Re: Gal Vihara, Sri Lanka

George G. ·
You mentioned Gal Vihara was commissioned by King Parakramabahu I (1153 - 1186 A.D), who also built Polonnaruwa's Great Palace Complex and the Vatadage (where the sacred Buddha Tooth Relic was kept). Is there a record of the names of the master stone carvers or the one who actually built / architect the Great Palace Complex?
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Re: Gal Vihara, Sri Lanka

DrFumblefinger ·
Something I've also thought about, George. And no, the credit goes to the big boss and not the people who actually do the work. So far as I know none of these crafts men -- and there must have been dozens on this project -- are known anymore.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 23, 2015: St George's church, Portland UK

GarryRF ·
Built of locally quarried Portland Stone the Church was opened on 1766. Then restored in the 1960s. Like many churches in England you can place where it's located by the colour of the stonework.
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Re: Discovering Art and History at Göttweig Abbey

George G. ·
My wife and I took a fantastic road trip down the banks of the Danube from Germany to Vienna. We stopped and toured Stift Gottweig (photo attached) which was a terrific find as you have described. Likewise our weather that day was blustery and chilly during our Thanksgiving holiday back in the mid-1990's. The nearby town of Krems was also a nice stop (photo of the Krems Steiner Tor (stone city gate)) is also attached. Enjoyed your travel description that rekindles the memories of that road trip.
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littlewill

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eluxton

eluxton
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Re: A Visit to Ireland: Part 3) Kenmare, Gateway to the Ring of Kerry

Former Member ·
This is a terrific tip ! --- For travelers with their own cars, the clockwise approach is preferable as you have the outside lane and better views all the way around and don't end up one small buggy in a convoy of huge buses. Your article makes us want to consider a trip to western Ireland, which has not been on the radar screen. The stone circles are worth the trip all by themselves.
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Re: Gallarus Oratory, Dingle Peninsula, Ireland

rbciao ·
Three more comments concerning Dingle: 1. Leaving the wharf/tourist area in Dingle and walking uphill into the central part of the town was very interesting in that we could interact with the locals and leave the hustle & bustle of the lower part of town. We stopped at a neat cafe for coffee called the Frog St. Cafe and we were the only non-locals in the place. 2. Between Dingle town and Slea Head is the Stone House Restaurant, which overlooks the bay and an ancient fort. The restaurant...
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Re: A Visit to Ireland: Part 6) Slea Head. A Tour of the Dingle Peninsula

IslandMan ·
Beautiful landscapes DrF. I especially like the stone walls and dwellings. There are similar ones in Malta except they are made of limestone
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Re: A Visit to Ireland: Part 6) Slea Head. A Tour of the Dingle Peninsula

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by GarryRF: IslandMan. Those limestone megalithic stones in Malta got me. I heard a passing tour guide telling folks "Where that man is standing is a fertility temple" Whoooa ! Too late .. first kid 9 months later - to the day ! GarryRF. Any megalithic stone that can make a man carry and deliver a child for 9 months has earned my respect -- and a place in medical history!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 2, 2013: BootHill Graveyard, Tombstone, Arizona

Mac ·
Ah great memories Dr. F! We had the pleasure of strolling round Boot Hill and then shaking hands with both Doc Holiday and Wyatt Earp themselves! (Well, they were the real one's weren't they?). The tomb stones, or grave markers, in Boot Hill make great reading. Quite a number referring to folks being "legally hanged" (did that make any difference to the end result?). I particularly liked the tomb 'stone' (board) saying: "Here lies George Johnson, hanged by mistake 1882. He was right, we was...
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Re: Pere Lachaise: Home to Permanent Parisians

PortMoresby ·
On the day I visited Pere Lachaise there was an elderly man flamboyantly "tending" Piaf's grave. Dressed theatrically, with long silver hair, he'd drawn a crowd, as I'm sure was his intent, while pretending to all appearances, that we weren't there. He circled the stone with over-the-top caring gestures and I wondered if he considered it his "job" to perpetuate the drama of The Little Sparrow. He was certainly succeeding that day.
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Re: Rogers Center, Toronto, Canada. Where Gumbo was #56

PHeymont ·
As I travel, I pay a lot of attention to statuary (there's so much!), but it's always special when it manages not only to tell a story, but to give you a little lift, a little laugh. Your samples from the Rogers Center are great! PS...for anyone with a taste for more semi-comic statues, we had a piece here on Gumbo last October: Laughter Set in Stone: Fun With Statues ...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#75)

Lynn Millar ·
Observations or random guesses: Christian (cross), Spanish (garb of non-angel statues), not a huge cathedral (scale) nor a wealthy one (bare stone work and growth on spires along railing). No ideas on beverage link or fortification.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#51)

DrFumblefinger ·
The ceiling looks made of concrete, but I'm unsure if the pillars are stone or concrete?
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Re: Help with Provence Itinerary

artsnletters ·
Nearest St-Remy: - Don't miss Les Baux . The village is touristy but the castle complex on top is fantastic and the views are to die for - you don't need to be a fan of scenery to appreciate them. - Roman ruins of Glanum , walking distance from St-Remy - Arles for more Roman ruins (but I think you've been already?) Farther away: - Day-trip to the Luberon for unmatched scenery and charming little villages full of vernacular architecture - what people build themselves, without an architect.
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Re: Wallace, Idaho: From mining town to "Center of the Universe"

PortMoresby ·
Wallace reminds me of all my favorite places in the western US although I'd never heard of it before. I guess it's the look of an era rather than a particular place, when civilization arrived, paid for by the mines. Shacks replaced by wood replaced by stone & brick, a similar story all over the West. And amazing that so many survive. Thanks, DrF.
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Re: The Ancient, Erotic Temples of Khajuraho

GarryRF ·
For the artists models to hold that pose long enough to do a stone carving was a feat of endurance far greater than completing a marathon ! Interesting blog showing that history can be both entertaining and meaningful.
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Re: The Ancient, Erotic Temples of Khajuraho

Anna Phipps ·
Thanks for commenting and glad that you enjoyed the post! Yes, imagine posing for a stone carving! I hadn't thought of it like that but was amazed by the quality and detail of the work. I find history really amazing and understanding about the history and meaning behind things like ancient temples and historical architecture makes the visit much more interesting for me. Originally Posted by GarryRF: For the artists models to hold that pose long enough to do a stone carving was a feat of...
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Re: Gallery: Cordoba's Great Mosque-Cathedral

PortMoresby ·
The engineering, carved arches supporting more carved arches, and layered colors of stone to such striking effect, just astounding. I've seen other pictures of it but having a good look now has been seeing it with new eyes. Thanks SO much.
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The beautiful and charming town, Gjirokastra

Travellinn ·
  The old town of Gjirokastra is one of the best-preserved examples of an Ottoman-style town in the Balkans.  The town is packed with sights, and I recommend to do as we did; buy a map with the main sights.  We also bought the book...
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Charleston's Grand Mansions: Drayton Hall

PortMoresby ·
  On a recent visit to  Charleston, South Carolina,  I bought a 2-day pass, called the Charleston Heritage Passport , at the North Charleston Visitor Center near the airport, and planned to include as many of the sites it offered of...
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The National Museum of Ireland: Archaeology, Dublin: Where Gumbo was #78

DrFumblefinger ·
  Seems not even the master Gumbo travel sleuths were able to crack our last puzzle.   Gumbo was visiting the fascinating Museum of Ireland, Archaeology division, situated on Kildare Street in Dublin.  The Archaeology Museum is housed...
 
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