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Tagged With "UNESCO"

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Re: Exploring Willemstad, Curacao’s UNESCO World Heritage Site

Marilyn Jones ·
Great piece and fabulous destination. I can almost feel the heat and humidity from your photos!
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Re: Exploring Willemstad, Curacao’s UNESCO World Heritage Site

Marilyn Jones ·
It was a long time ago and warm, yes, but I seem to remember Curacao being dry, think goats & tumbleweeds.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
DrF, I'm guessing the answer is a straightforward geologic issue, but can you tell me what determines whether the hills are part of, or alternatively simply adjoin, the mountains? All VERY interesting!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
I believe it is an issue of the mountains' origins. A range has a common origin from a common fault line. The Rockies are a fairly new range, and the Porcupines have been around longer and are much more eroded. But I'm not a geologist, PM. I just look at them and think it's all beautiful!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
A good answer - scientifically & emotionally! Thanks again.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
I loved Head Samshed In when I visited it. Definitely a must see if you get to that part of the world. If you do also go to the Frank Slide site. A massive land-slide took placein the 1920's (I think). i will find one of my photos.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, Jonathan. The Frank Slide is in the Crowsnest Pass area and it's very interesting to see. Beautiful valley as well with a lot of mining history
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks ,it truly is a highlight of any trip to the area.I loved the Location and setting of the house.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
Jefferson has always been a fascinating and difficult character, with many sides to his life and work. Aside from the Monticello and other designs, he was also a pioneer agriculturalist, importing many varieties of flowers and vegetables, and improving them by breeding. But for me, the hardest task, mentally and emotionally, is to reconcile the brilliant political and philosophical words with an absolute refusal to even question the institution of slavery, when many others of his time in...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I never try to judge historic figures through the prism of modern values. Remember in the 18th century slavery was a global institution -- absolutely every country in the world had slaves. And being from Virginia, he knew the southern states wouldn't join northern colonies in forming a new country without slavery being allowed, so I don't think he thought it was time to fight that fight. I think he valued the formation of the new country above all else -- risking his life to do so...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
I would agree that presentism is a real danger for historians...but without wanting to veer this discussion too far off course, you'll note that I cited two of his close colleagues and acquaintances in Virginia alone, not to mention Lafayette and many others IN HIS TIME AND ACQUAINTANCE who had already concluded that it was time, and many others were acting on it. It was an active debate in his time and place, he was aware of it, and sadly...he took the wrong side.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
I agree his side was not the right one, PHeymont, but I also believe of greatest importance for him was forming the new country. I don't think we'll ever know his personal feelings about slavery because he didn't write about them.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
I believe you can tell a great deal about someone from what they leave behind. On a visit to Monticello I was struck by the design of the house and the distinct sensibility it indicated regarding the creative mind of it's designer. I bought a sundial in the gift shop and am reminded of the man every time I look at it.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
Regarding his feeling about slavery, I have no doubt, because of the nature of the man as shown by the things he did write, he was conflicted. And while he seems never to have come to a personal solution I don't believe, either, that his lack of action was de facto support for the institution. Sometimes there just isn't time to resolve one's own conflicts and be a father of a new nation too. We may be asking too much of human beings if we expect tidy packages and complete resolutions in 1 ...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
I visited Monticello as a kid and enjoyed the views. I need to go back now and look at the architecture here and especially at the U of V in more detail. My favorite John Kennedy quote (to his staff at a dinner in the White HOuse) I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered at the White House - with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone. Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quo...#G4wQ5S4SazWSs0dq.99
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Re: Where Gumbo Was, #6: The Japanese Covered Bridge, Hoi An, Vietnam

PortMoresby ·
A great Where in the World is Gumbo Pic this week by Port Moresby . I couldn't believe anyone would get it. Hats off to Club2013 for nailing it!
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Re: Where Gumbo Was, #6: The Japanese Covered Bridge, Hoi An, Vietnam

PortMoresby ·
Thanks for this. I'm learning more bout a part of the world I've never been.
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Re: Where Gumbo Was, #6: The Japanese Covered Bridge, Hoi An, Vietnam

PortMoresby ·
JohnT, over the years Asia has become more & more a favorite part of the planet for me to wander and hang out. I think the reason may be, in part, because it's much more in a state of flux than, say, Europe and as a result has more to offer someone who likes a bit of edge to their travels. I fear Europe has become somewhat more of the same wherever I go these days while Asia offers more of what I seem to need. Not to say there aren't parts of Europe to which I still enjoy returning. But...
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
It's interesting how we perceive age. In the U.S., we have few buildings over 200 years old, while in other places buildings older than that are part of the housing stock. And here we have a building of intricate design and decoration old enough that we hardly know any of the history of its builders. A reminder to us how much there is to see and know that is beyond our daily lives. Thank you for the tour!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Perceptions of time ! Interesting subject. You do get a little blasé about History when you're surrounded by it. This is my local Church. It's nearly a thousand years old and still in regular use !
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Age is relative, isn't it? I guess they called it the "New World" for a reason. That's a beautiful church, Garry, and in such a lovely setting. Maybe you can share more about it with us sometime in a POD or short blog post.
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
TravelandNature. You'd be surprised at how many people have been saved by that Church. "Regulars" from hundreds of years ago still attend services and Funerals. Next door to this Church is a Pub and folks come out to catch the last Bus at Mid-night. They often see 8 Nuns in white carrying a coffin through the main doors. Which are still closed - of course!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
GarryRF was kind enough to take me to that church It's impressive. People just walk old walls too there like it's no big deal. I guess it's really what you're used to
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Walking the "Walls" that enclose the City - maybe 3 miles around - is a local ritual ! At frequent intervals there are Pubs to stop at. The idea being that you stop at each one , have a drink and proceed to the next. Its only the hardened drinkers who complete the circuit. A friend from Anna Maria Island, Florida sent his daughter to stay with us for a while. Same age as my daughter and they got along like a house on fire ! So when we arrived in Chester I told her our day was walking around...
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
On my first visit to Anna Maria I was amazed that the Pelicans would sit next to you on the pier by Allemande Villas. Like a pet dog. They would try and steal your bait as you were fishing. But like a good dog they responded to a "Hey you!" and sat watching you. When I caught my first fish I pulled and fought with the monster! As I lifted my prize from the water my new Pelican friend flexed his wings. He glided off the Pier and with great precision removed my catch from the hook! He passed...
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Re: Ottawa – NOT the coldest Capital in the world!

DrFumblefinger ·
Nice article, but have to point out that the "Capitol" is a building in Washington DC while Ottawa (and Washington DC itself for that matter) are the "capitals" of their countries. One letter, but very different meanings.
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Re: Ottawa – NOT the coldest Capital in the world!

DrFumblefinger ·
So noted, Todd!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
For those who are interested, we received this link which has some interesting graphics of Newgrange site. http://www.openuniversity.edu/...he-winter-solstice-a
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Re: La Dolce Vita (Part 5) Venezia (Venice)

DrFumblefinger ·
Great pictures...makes me want to go back! Interesting to note: the Mayor of Venice has been very active lately in trying to get the large cruise ships re-routed to keep them out of the fragile space between San Marco and Guidecca...and last month hundreds of people swam out to try to block the ships!
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Re: La Dolce Vita (Part 5) Venezia (Venice)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for your comments, PHeymont. The cruise ships are BIG business in Venice, and certainly allow a lot of people to enjoy the destination if only for a day. But there are easily places the ships could park that wouldn't hurt the delicate lagoon, then shuttle people into the city.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 8, 2013 : The Sanctuary Knocker, Durham Cathedral, a World Heritage site

Mac ·
It's an impressive image, Mac, made all the more interesting by the story behind it. One sometimes forgets the role the church played in "forgiveness" acts through the centuries. I'm always astounded at the quality of craftsmanship behind these thousand year old items. In many ways, we've lost ground, not improved on their skills. Thanks for the education, and sharing this photo!
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Re: The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm leaving next week for San Diego and then a 17 day cruise to and around the Hawaiian Islands. I have never been all that interested in Hawaii (so why am I going you ask?) but your blog and photos have begun to pique my curiosity. Thank you. (I am not looking forward to going through U.S. Immigration, I can tell you that. It is quite unpleasant for non-Americans.)
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Re: The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
US Immigration is a bit of a hassle, although most Canadians receive about a smooth a ride as possible. In most Canadian airports, you can actually clear immigration within Canada, rather than the USA (infinitely preferable because the lines are so much shorter). Not sure if that's true of Montreal, though. Thank you for your kind words about the Hawaii blogs. Hawaii is a special place. I've always gone and explored it by myself, so in this setting I tend to drift to isolated places that are...
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Re: The Valley Island of Maui: 2) Haleakala National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Yes, we will go through U.S.Immigration at Trudeau Airport in Montreal. At one time, the U.S. Immigration hall there had a huge banner across it emblazoned with the words "WELCOME TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" It isn't there anymore. Someone must have figured out this was still, after all, Canada. Yes, 17 days is a long time on a ship. I am travelling with a friend who needs this type of getaway just now.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 10, 2013: Banff and the Bow River Valley

PHeymont ·
Is there a list somewhere of these UNESCO World Heritage Sites ? What are the criteria for inclusion ?
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 10, 2013: Banff and the Bow River Valley

PHeymont ·
If you hadn't asked, I wouldn't have known! So, from UNESCO's website, here's the word: T he World Heritage List includes 981 properties forming part of the cultural and natural heritage which the World Heritage Committee considers as having outstanding universal value. These include 759 cultural, 193 natural and 29 mixed properties in160 States Parties. As of September 2012, 190 States Parties have ratified the World Heritage Convention. Here's a LINK to more info, including the list.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 10, 2013: Banff and the Bow River Valley

PHeymont ·
There are a lot of fabulous places to visit. I need to get busy. The list is handily sorted by countries. I will bookmark this and consult it when planning a trip to a particular country or region. Thanks for the information.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 27, 2013: Ravenna, Italy

PHeymont ·
Reminds me somewhat of the interior of St. Mark's basilica in Venice. Beautiful photos, PHeymont. Love the detailed art on these old churches.
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Re: 25 Yr Old Wins $ 1M Picasso for only $ 135 US

Travel Rob ·
I saw this in the paper this morning as well. Apparently there are only 10,000 tickets left... Gotta admit it's tempting...only way I'd ever own a Picasso...just wouldn't go with the rest of my decor though...clashes with "Dogs playing poker."
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Re: 25 Yr Old Wins $ 1M Picasso for only $ 135 US

Travel Rob ·
Originally Posted by JohnT: I saw this in the paper this morning as well. Apparently there are only 10,000 tickets left... Gotta admit it's tempting...only way I'd ever own a Picasso...just wouldn't go with the rest of my decor though...clashes with "Dogs playing poker." No John, don't think it would clash with the Dog picture. Welcome back. Hope you've recovered from your jet lag and have settled into "life as usual" (ie. starting to plan your next trip).
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Re: The Beautiful Pools and Geysers of Yellowstone National Park

Dr.Y ·
Wow! those vivid colors were totally unexpected. I'm assuming different chemicals in the water and rocks are producing them?
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Re: The Beautiful Pools and Geysers of Yellowstone National Park

Dr.Y ·
DrY is away on vacation this week, PHeymont, so he'll get back to you on his return. But I believe a lot of these colors are due to the highly specialized microorganisms that live in this environment.
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Re: The Beautiful Pools and Geysers of Yellowstone National Park

Dr.Y ·
Wow amazing pictures, beautiful colors, i love the ones with the yellow and orange colors. Is it true that under the Yellowstone Park is a giant vulcano and if it will be an eruption the whole America will be extinguished ?
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Re: The Beautiful Pools and Geysers of Yellowstone National Park

Dr.Y ·
Hi Andre, and welcome. As DrY is away on vacation, I'll try to answer your question before he gets back. Yellowstone National Park does sit on what is known as the "Yellowstone Hot Spot". You see this in its geysirs and hot water pools. This does have the potential to become a massive volcano and cause a tremendous eruption. As big as any volcano in recorded history and then some. The jet stream would carry the ash and smoke mostly east (towards the Atlantic Ocean), so those areas would be...
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Re: The Beautiful Pools and Geysers of Yellowstone National Park

Dr.Y ·
Thank you for the information DrFumble Let's hope... )
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Re: The Beautiful Pools and Geysers of Yellowstone National Park

Dr.Y ·
Hi PHeymont, Andre and DrFumblefinger, Just back from a winter break and glad to see many of you also like the brilliant colors associated with the geysers, pools and hot springs in Yellowstone! As of how the mesmerizing colors are formed, I know no more than my friend DrFumblefinger (thanks Karl for the explanation). I only know that was those incredible heat-loving thermophiles that somehow survived and produced those amazing nature wonders.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day September 9, 2013: Thingvellir National Park, Iceland

DrFumblefinger ·
I like the idea! We'll put the idea out there as bait for our members. Anyone want to write about the origin of their country (or some countries that interest them), especially from a modern travelers perspective?
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Re: Good news, bad news on UNESCO's world heritage

PHeymont ·
I enjoy traveling to UNESCO sites because most of them are very interesting destinations. I even know of some travelers whose goal it is to see "every" UNESCO listing. Good luck to them! I really think UNESCO is doing it's job by identifying important places and encouraging their conservation. I shudder at the thought of a global UNESCO police swooping in to "defend" these sites. It's up to the countries that govern them to do so. Some do a great job; others don't. Some citizens care, others...
 
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