Tagged With "card"

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Re: Managing Your Money on the Road

Travel Rob ·
This is a great compehensive post. Time to try and cash the money order that you've been holding! LOL
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

DrFumblefinger ·
You would think the cost of all this fraud would be more than enough to validate new chip and PIN rollout in the USA. Can't quite understand why the US banks are so resistent to this PHeymont. Have you an understanding of what their reasons are?
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PHeymont ·
It's been a long path. For a long time, observers thought it was because they were committed to contactless (RFID) technology as the next step...but that hasn't advances as fast as some predicted, and it has big security issues, too. Now that MC and Visa have set down a "you must comply or you will be responsible for fraudulent charges" rule for next year, we're seeing motion. BUT...so far most issuers have been sticking to chip-and-signature, not and-PIN, which guts the whole process.
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PortMoresby ·
I don't quite see why using a pin would prevent fraud of the type we're seeing on a large scale. Presumably, if the hackers continue to target terminals, the pin would be compromised too. Yes, we could change the pin but it would need to be done immediately, before the damage is done. What am I missing?
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

DrFumblefinger ·
As I see it, PM, mostly they are just stealing the data off the magnetic strip. Or the PIN in the card has data that can also be copied, but that's a little hard than just scamming the read off the strip. With a PIN, that data, validated by your unique PIN (which you pick) are encrypted and sent off to the bank for approval. Not just the strip data, but the two together are the key. I have a credit card with a Canadian bank (chip and pin) which I prefer to use over the swipe and sign USA...
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PHeymont ·
In the most secure system, the PIN is known to you, the user, but is not in your records at the issuer. That's why if you forget your PIN, a new one can be generated, but no one can send you your "lost" PIN the way that passwords can be. In the PIN system, the first communication takes place at the terminal. The terminal reads the PIN from the chip on your card, and asks you to enter it on the pad. If it matches, the terminal does NOT send the PIN to the clearing house or merchant...it only...
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PortMoresby ·
So, if I understand it then, even if the hackers can read the entered pin keystrokes from the terminal keypad which we enter, it cannot be used without the card with the unique chip, which cannot be duplicated as a magnetic strip can be duplicated?
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Re: Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PHeymont ·
That's correct. It is, of course, not totally impossible to create a duplicate chip, but it takes major equipment, not $5 worth of RadioShack parts...and it would also require much more information than can be harvested easily. The relative security (and it is relative) has driven over 80% of the world's credit card fraud toward the U.S. as other areas become more difficult. And once everyone is on board, the Trojan Horse mag stripe can come off the card as well.
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

PHeymont ·
Actually, that's only one way of looking at it...another is that it may push many people (I included) to resume cash tips. The "convenient" suggested amounts, which even now appear on many slips can be very deceptive, both because they usually place the normal or usual amount as if it were the lowest "acceptable" amount, but also because often—not always—they calculate percent not on the restaurant bill but on the total of the bill plus tax. The difference can be significant. Interestingly,...
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

GarryRF ·
In the UK where we've had chip and pin cards for years we never include the tip with the total. Always cash to the waiter. We know how unscrupulous Restaurant owners can be.
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

Travel Rob ·
It is safer that the card doesn't leave our sight with the chip cards and cash tips seem to be the answer. I don't know the statistics on the percent of people not carrying cash, but I know several young people that almost never carry cash.
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

JohnT ·
We've had suggested amounts for years on the machines. I was just in Ireland where tips weren't usually included as an option on the bill I never had the right amount of cash. Frankly maybe I'm lazy but I don't mind having the option on the machine. It's been a while. Nice to see you all (metaphorically that is).
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

PHeymont ·
Note that the tip suggestions on the machines have a habit of creeping up. New York cab tips were about 15% for years, as a standard, and as recently as 2 years ago, a Times survey found that was about the norm. But...when you pay by credit card, the machine offers a choice of 20%, 25% or 30%. To use 15%, you have to go back one step in the process, make a manual entry, and then back to the close-out screen...all while you're trying to get out of the cab and stop holding up traffic. I'll bet...
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

Travel Rob ·
According to that link I posted above, tipping is up for NY Taxis 10% with those default setting tips and they are expecting an increase at restaurants too now.
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Re: Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

Travel Rob ·
Good seeing you JohnT!
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Card Fraud: U.S. is the Target, but Banks Resist Change

PHeymont ·
In the news this week: over 40 million credit card users possibly affected by theft of data from magnetic stripes on credit cards used at Target stores—only one of many such incidents. As many travelers know, in the rest of the world, more...
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Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

PHeymont ·
PICKING THE RIGHT TECH FOR YOUR NEEDS   This is part 1 of a 4-part report on communication for travelers.   Years ago, traveling meant being out of touch with home, and struggling with unfamiliar pay phones for local calls for...
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Managing Your Money on the Road

PHeymont ·
 If you’ve never seen a travelers’ check and maybe don’t even know what it is, you’re like most overseas travelers these days. Going abroad no longer means planning to carry wads of cash, or trekking off to American...
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Chip Credit Cards to Change the Way US Tips at Restaurants

Travel Rob ·
While the US has been very slow implementing the chip and pin credit card that Europe uses, US banks are finally starting to roll out the chip and signature cards on a bigger scale.   Under the new system, American chip card users...
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Check Your Statement! A Big Hotel Credit Card Breach...

PHeymont ·
White Lodging, which operates hotels under a number of major brands including Westin, Marriott, Sheraton and Holiday Inn, has acknowledged a major theft of customer credit card information including names, numbers, security codes and more. The breach...
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Up, Up and Away: Airline miles cards with big bonuses

PHeymont ·
Up, up and away—quickly! That’s the goal for many frequent fliers, and a current round of cards for various airlines is offering some big bonuses to meet that goal…some of them enough for a round-trip to Europe in one shot. Right...
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When Debit and Credit Cards aren't your best traveling choices

DrFumblefinger ·
Recently PHeymont wrote a nice article on how to pay for things while traveling abroad which I'd recommend you familiarize yourself with (click  here ) before reading the rest of this blog post.  I largely agree with what he posted, but...
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Will foreign transactions fees fade away?

PHeymont ·
Foreign transaction fees, that annoying 3% (usual rate) that your card issuer charges to translate your 100€ hotel room into dollars, seem to be fading...but slowly, according to a survey by creditcards.com.   The fees, which can add up to a...
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EASY WAYS TO TRAVEL IN LONDON DURING PEAK HOURS

John ·
London, which is the English capital, has an incredible public transport network. An agency, called Transport for London (TfL), controls all kind of public transport such as London Underground, Overground, Buses, Tramlink, Docklands Light Railway (DLR) and London River Services. Although London has an efficient transport system, travelling could become a little less convenient during peak hours as is the case with any major city in the world. Most people travel during these times which force...
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The Bay Area by "Clipper"

PortMoresby ·
PortMoresby turns misfortune into adventure when, after almost 6 decades of dependence on her car, discovers public transportation from one end of San Francisco Bay to the other.
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Chase's new card: Big bonus, big benefits - Right for you?

PHeymont ·
Chase is offering a big bonus and big benefits...but check carefully to see if it's the card for you because it also has a big fee!
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Mac ·
It's a nightmare! A fair chunk of my packing now includes various chargers, connection cables and mains power adaptors for phones, iPads, Kindles. cameras.... Oh, plus a universal backup power supply battery (RAVPOWER - good value) in case I cannot get to a mains socket - just to keep in touch! I have to say that the Euro proposal to have ONE single charger for all devices has some merit!! PS - watch out that chargers that are sold as suitable for iPhones are often not powerful enough to...
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Mac ·
The RAVPOWER unit that I went for is shown on the following link (a real mouthful): http://www.ravpower.com/ravpow...hite-us-version.html This model has enough power to fully recharge an iPad! Currently available from Amazon for USD 36.00 They also do more powerful packs. (Hope this doesn't cut across any "No Advertising" policies
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

DrFumblefinger ·
No, Mac, that doesn't cross any sort of policy. We want to help travelers get good honest feedback about products that might be helpful to them on the road (or conversely that aren't worth the money). What's not tolerated is people paid to promote products on our website and providing dishonest information. Ravpower is exactly the kind of unit I'm looking for. Need to go order it soon.
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

PHeymont ·
In the Duel of the Devices, I'm going to declare the RAVPower unit the winner. Both of these devices are essentially external batteries, something that's becoming more popular as more phones come with non-removable batteries. There are two critical differences, however: capacity and output. The PowerStick has a capacity of 750mAh (about half the power held by an average cellphone battery) and a maximum output current of 700mA (phone chargers usually supply 1000mA). The RAVpower device has a...
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

PHeymont ·
By the way...here's my solution to the other charger issue (plugging in at home). It's a 5-port USB host that has a short cord to plug in (no brick to get in the way at the outlet) and takes 5 standard USB cords for your devices...the kind that come with your device, although more are available cheaply. The five outputs include 2 2100mA for iPad, 2 1000mA for most phones, and 1 1300mA for Samsung. All can be used for any device up to the designated output (that is, you can plug your phone...
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Former Member ·
PowerStick only charges from a USB port. The PowerStick has a capacity of 750mAh Perfect ! That is all that I need for my modest travel needs - just a little juice for a camera or my old flip (!) phone, if needed during a day of sightseeing. The PowerStick is only about the size of a pen, takes no thought to use and does not involve batteries. My kind of tool. Travelers who carry a lot more toys have greater needs than little me.
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Former Member ·
Well, I understand the urge for simplicity and not getting tied down...but both the PowerStick and the RAVPower ar e batteries. The RAVPower isn't big; about the size of a cellphone. But it costs 30% less, and will actually put a full charge on a phone, which the other won't. In fact, it will put a full charge on about 6 phones.
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Re: Staying In Touch on the Road: Part 1

Former Member ·
Ran across this device for charging smartphones http://www.jackeryusa.com/
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Re: Up, Up and Away: Airline miles cards with big bonuses

rbciao ·
I have a Delta American Express Platinum card that has served us well. The fee is higher than the gold card, but we can check two bags free, priority boarding, and a free companion pass yearly. We fly two or three times a year and the value of the waived baggage fee and the companion pass far exceed the $150 annual fee. The card also accrues one mile for each dollar spent and lately has offered cash back incentives. For example: spend $15 at Panera's using the card and receive $5 credit on...
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Re: Up, Up and Away: Airline miles cards with big bonuses

PortMoresby ·
I LOVE my airline credit card, but it's great to have all this information in one place to see if I could do better. Probably not without some whopping fees, but whopping bonuses, too. Thank you sir, for showing us all these choices!
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Re: When Debit and Credit Cards aren't your best traveling choices

PortMoresby ·
I've been places where it was not possible to use a credit card much of the time, even when I was told that I could, by the very people who then returned and said, sorry, not working, cash please. But Burma was the only place I can recall that was, when I was there a year+ ago, 100% cash. It's changing now, even there, I've heard. So this has been very interesting, reading about Argentina. Who'da thought?
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Re: When Debit and Credit Cards aren't your best traveling choices

DrFumblefinger ·
When you go to Sri Lanka, take cash along as well. The larger establishments will definitely take credit cards, but smaller business and restaurants won't. And ATM cards have been slow to find their way into the country, especially in remote locations. The currency there is more stable, but still you won't get the kind of spread we did in Argentina. Best to exchange it at a bank, or ask your hotel people how many US $$ things are.
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