Tagged With "UNESCO World Heritage Site"

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Re: Journey to Jordan: Amman and Jarash

RoadWorrier ·
I really enjoyed the pictures and the report! I'm looking forward to more. It's always interesting to realize that there was a Mediterranean world that was not so "European" or "African"
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Re: Dec 15, 2016: Kamloops, BC, Canada

GarryRF ·
BC has many exiled folks from Liverpool. Like many other cities around the world. I have relatives in Fraser Lake. They have the most beautiful beach too, if you're into cryogenics. Many Canadians have a wonderful "Cheeky" humour too !
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Re: Antarctica, part 3. Antarctica Rocks!

DrFumblefinger ·
What a great and fascinating conclusion to wonderful series! I've really enjoyed following your adventures and animal interactions around the world. Many thanks, Kirsten!
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Re: Antarctica, part 3. Antarctica Rocks!

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Kirsten, Behind in my emails, but did want you to know that the last of your series on Celebrating Nature went live today. I want to personally thank you so very much for sharing your tremendous talents with our audience. I enjoyed reading -- and learned a lot -- from your posts and greatly enjoyed your wonderful photography! I'm sure many others did, too. If you have more material you'd like to post on TravelGumbo in the coming months, it would be our pleasure to host it. Hope you had a...
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? (#195)

DrFumblefinger ·
It's time for another clue. This man played a significant role in helping preserve and promote the features of our site of interest.....
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? (#195)

DrFumblefinger ·
To help you better define our locale, here are a few more clues before we look at the specific site tomorrow. You can buy these near the entrance to our site.... And see sunsets like these from a nearby beach....
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Re: Trains in Cuba

PHeymont ·
Great question...and possibly not an easy clear answer. Cuba's trains have generally been in poor shape in recent years as older equipment has run down and spares not available. However, according to Mark Smith (The Man in Seat 61), that's changing with the arrival of a fleet of new Chinese-built locomotives. On his site ( Seat61.com ) he has an extensive update of recent changes in schedules, routes and locations (that's important because Havana's main station is closed for a 3-year...
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Re: Trains in Cuba

Wilbur's Travels ·
Thanks for the info. I too love Mark's site. I will try my damnedest to do a train journey if I can so I can send you details. Wilbur.
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Re: Sept 10, 2018: Rideau Canal, Ottawa

GarryRF ·
I was lucky enough to "borrow" a beautiful house on Rideau Lakes and explore Ottawa. Beautiful - but underpopulated - part of the world. Perfect for me,
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Re: January 20, 2020: Newport Beach, California

GarryRF ·
Great photos Rob. Can I use your POD page to ask a question that I've been afraid to ask ? When I visit my US Family each year from the UK I am impressed with the good standards of Restaurant Food. But when I ask why some Restaurants are rated better than others the answer surprises me. "Because Restaurant C serves huge portions" In a health concious World I wonder do folks ever question themselves ?
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Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

PHeymont ·
That's good news, Mac! OK...the leaves start turning first in the north, moving south as the weather changes...but timing is always tricky because it depends on each year's combination of temperature and humidity. Here's a link to a site I've found useful in the past...it's from Yankee magazine, and includes a live map of the progress of the leaves as well as itineraries and more. http://www.yankeefoliage.com/ We haven't had a good leaf-peeping piece on Gumbo yet, so I'm looking forward to...
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Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

DrFumblefinger ·
Regarding hotels, Mac, I think I'd spend a few days in Boston to begin with, presuming that's where you are flying into. This will let you get over your jet lag and also give you a chance to see the state of the colors and plot out where you want to go. I would NOT go without having at least a night's reservation booked ahead because you'll waste too much time looking for a place to stay and will end up paying rack rate. Things will be busy and pretty filled up in the small towns of New...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, July 14, 2015: YanGuan -- a scenic little town to watch Qiantang’s Tidal Bore (钱塘江潮)in China

Roderick Simpson ·
I have heard of the Qiantang Tidal Bore, which is the biggest in the World. The largest in Europe is that on the River Severn in South West England, which is highest near the equinoxes - a website details times and height predictions. I attach some pictures from a few years ago taken near a pub, conveniently located near a good viewing site. The bore is particularly popular with surfers, and I believe the world record for longest wave ride was recorded there.
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Re: Mission San Xavier del Bac, Tucson, Arizona

PortMoresby ·
In my experience, one of the most beautiful buildings in the world. Thanks, Rob.
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Re: Norwegian bank is out of cash, on purpose

PHeymont ·
I think what we're seeing here is a blindness in planning, which goes beyond questions of technology. You've identified some scenarios where cashless becomes hopeless/helpless. I see the same kind of lack of forethought when I see several huge residential towers being built in downtown Brooklyn...on top of already overcrowded subway stations, and with no forethought to larger sewer or water connections... In the bleakest possible view, we may self-destruct not through a world war, but...
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Re: Norwegian bank is out of cash, on purpose

PortMoresby ·
I'm not surprised that this is happening in Scandinavia, of all places. Many years ago I had friends in Denmark and Erik was an electrician. There wasn't enough work for all the electricians so they rotated the work and he worked for 6 months, then had 6 months off, paid. Sounds good? However, during the 6 months he was off he wasn't allowed to do any electrical work at all, including on his own house. I (and he) found the rule regarding his own house absurd. I see it related to the banking...
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Re: Wonders of the Modern World

DrFumblefinger ·
The Soviets have never been completely transparent about Chernobyl, but this is the story as best as I was able to synthesize it: It seems that the alarm system was malfunctioning (going off all the time) so it was turned off by the tech monitoring the system. He had the fuel rods pulled out of their cooling chambers for maintenance work, was distracted (remember, the alarms are off), then by the time he focused back on the task at hand the rods had begun to melt and couldn't be reinserted...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 16, 2015: Franklin Automobiles in Tucson, Arizona

PHeymont ·
I’ve heard that, but I’ve also always wondered if it were true, since a driver holding the reins on a horse or horses would want to be able to exert equal force on either side…and all the pictures I can find of buggy drivers seem to show the driver in the middle! One site I just looked at suggests that Ford made the switch to make it easier for passengers to get in and out, by moving the driver away from the curb; the same site suggests that in the early days on the Continent, right-hand was...
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Re: Miscou Island Lighthouse, New Brunswick, Canada (Where Gumbo Was, #134)

TravelingCanuck ·
Interesting story. A little known bit of Canadian history. Thanks. “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” – St. Augustine
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 5, 2015: Stone Gingerbread House

TravelingCanuck ·
I love stone houses like this one. There was one, on a much smaller scale, in my hometown that was right on the waterfront. @PHeymont - it is listed for a mere 11 million. http://www.zillow.com/homes/fo...4.039602_rect/18_zm/ “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” – St. Augustine
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Re: Exploring Willemstad, Curacao’s UNESCO World Heritage Site

DrFumblefinger ·
Great piece and fabulous destination. I can almost feel the heat and humidity from your photos!
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Re: Exploring Willemstad, Curacao’s UNESCO World Heritage Site

PortMoresby ·
It was a long time ago and warm, yes, but I seem to remember Curacao being dry, think goats & tumbleweeds.
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Re: Marriott buys Starwood for $12.2 billion...what's in it for loyalists?

PHeymont ·
I'm hopeful, since I think the last thing in the world Marriott should want to do is to signal Starwood loyalists that they aren't valued. Wonder how long before SPG rewards will book Marriott rooms...that could be a quick thing to do!
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Re: Sydney Expat Guide

GarryRF ·
My first impression of Australia was how clean and modern everywhere is. Oz has a shorter history span than the US. Their view of people from other countries is limited to what they see on TV News. Similar to Americans. My 3 kids lived in Australia for a while and found it very safe with well mannered folks. I have lots of family over there and the great plus of living in Oz is being able to enjoy the great outdoors. Even in winter when most days are above 60f - which the locals call cold !
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Re: Airbnb's rural listings gain popularity

PortMoresby ·
"...the short-term rental site is clearly not just for urban hipsters anymore." From my own experience I'd put a somewhat different spin on it. Something like "urban hipsters seek rural experience". A good percentage of my guests come from one of the hipster capitols of the universe, San Francisco.
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Re: August 5, 2017: The Potter and his Wife

GarryRF ·
Re-cycling - saving the world - one pot at a time !
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Re: Escape from Disney: Tiber-Butler Preserve

George G. ·
I'm with you. Disney World fractured my nerves after the first 10 minutes and my wife and I could have used a far more tranquil setting like the Nature Preserve.
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Re: Ancients in the White Mountains: Searching for Methuselah

DrFumblefinger ·
The search for the oldest tree in the world! That's quite an adventure, Tim! Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site, Manitoba (Where Gumbo Was #184)

Marilyn Jones ·
What an interesting historic site! I really enjoy learning new history lessons -- thank you!!!
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Re: Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site, Manitoba (Where Gumbo Was #184)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for your comment, Garry. The York boats were important to the development of the prairies, as was the Red River cart. You find examples of both at this historic site.
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Re: Portland, Maine: A Big Little City

PHeymont ·
It's about 30 miles north of Cabot's Cove, which is near Wells, Maine. Which is at one end of the excellent Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, which combines forest and shore habitats and makes a wonderful walk. It was featured in a couple of Pictures of the Day, and was the scene, back in 2013, of Where in the World is TravelGumbo #5
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Re: Brooklyn Museum: Depth, Variety, Whimsy

GarryRF ·
This looks like a World Class Museum. Worthy of a few days - at least. How lucky you are to be on the doorstep of such a magnificent collection of American History.
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Re: Red Brick and Sandstone: Look of the North

GarryRF ·
If you had travelled a mile north you would have seen the biggest brick built building in the world. Liverpool Tobacco Warehouse, The 14 storey building spans across 36 acres - and its construction used 27 million bricks, 30,000 panes of glass and 8,000 tons of steel
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Re: Flights to Cuba: lots of planes, not so many passengers

GarryRF ·
Many returning tourists will be telling their American friends that life in a third world country - like Cuba - is worse than just having only one flavour of Ice Cream.
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Re: Experience Lalgarh Palace with Palace on Wheels Train

Professorabe ·
Without doubt this mode of travel appeals to some people. However, on our travels through Rajasthan we encountered tour groups from the Palace on Wheels on a couple of occasions and felt that going by road, with a car and driver, suited us much better. You simply saw a hell of a lot more, had much more contact with the local people, and were not tied to any schedule. We stayed at the Laxmi Niwas Palace, which is part of the Lalgarh site, and it was very pleasant indeed. (Whilst there are...
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Re: What's the Best City in the World to Eat in?

PHeymont ·
I won't claim any city to be the best in the world—at least not until I have time to visit them all! I'm always skeptical anyway about "the best" "the most" and so forth. That said, I'll also add that the best is not always the most expensive or famous. And I'm pleased to see that he's not pushing posh places, but rather inexpensive curry houses and a 24-hour cafe. His point seems to be that London is the best city to eat in because it is, his opinion, the best city to BE in. So, I'll...
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Re: What's the Best City in the World to Eat in?

GarryRF ·
The Restaurants in London have Chefs and Staff from the country they represent. They're not 2nd or 3rd generation French or Indonesian people. They have mostly arrived in the UK after learning their trade. Even in Liverpool I can taste the authentic food of 30 or more countries, So in a Cosmopolitan Capital like London I'm sure I could eat genuine food from anywhere in the world !
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan, 21, 2014: Raccoon, Vancouver, British Columbia

PHeymont ·
And they are smart. When my kids were young, we used to camp every summer in Maine, at a site where raccoons came every night to feast at the cans. One year I decided I'd had enough, and brought chain tethers to keep the lids on. Worked fine, the lids stayed quiet all night. But in the morning, when we left our tents, we found that our two stryofoam coolers (which were not in use) had been shredded, all the implements from the table were on the ground, and the ropes securing our storage tarp...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan, 21, 2014: Raccoon, Vancouver, British Columbia

DrFumblefinger ·
Yes, that sounds about in character for them. Cute, but cunning. When there is a global Holocaust someday, it will not be the insects that take over the world. It will be the raccoons! Or at least the raccoons will be the commanders. The insects might be their foot soldiers.
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Re: Universal Orlando Goes All Out This Summer

Former Member ·
I love Harry Potter and the World of Harry, i'm a big fan It will be a dream come true if i'll ever visit this enchanted place
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Re: Everyone loves a parade and party!

GarryRF ·
Just another example of how warm and friendly people are around the world. No TV or Newspaper report. Lots of colours in their clothing. And I'm pleased to see the Bagpipes travel so well ! You didn't say if you fell under the spell of a curry meal. But a wonderful flavour of the day.
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Re: Macaroons in a Paris bakery

PHeymont ·
I'm not a big fan of macarons (sorry, world!) but among them my favorites are coffee and Fruits Rouges. I noticed recently that there is a caramel with sea salt one now available...will report on that in July.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

PortMoresby ·
DrF, I'm guessing the answer is a straightforward geologic issue, but can you tell me what determines whether the hills are part of, or alternatively simply adjoin, the mountains? All VERY interesting!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
I believe it is an issue of the mountains' origins. A range has a common origin from a common fault line. The Rockies are a fairly new range, and the Porcupines have been around longer and are much more eroded. But I'm not a geologist, PM. I just look at them and think it's all beautiful!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

PortMoresby ·
A good answer - scientifically & emotionally! Thanks again.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

Jonathan L ·
I loved Head Samshed In when I visited it. Definitely a must see if you get to that part of the world. If you do also go to the Frank Slide site. A massive land-slide took placein the 1920's (I think). i will find one of my photos.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, Jonathan. The Frank Slide is in the Crowsnest Pass area and it's very interesting to see. Beautiful valley as well with a lot of mining history
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #11

PHeymont ·
Well, here it is Friday night, and I see everyone gathered around to see what's in the Gumbo (e)mailbag and here...because indeed, the mystery has again been solved. Gumbo was in the Roman Arena at Arles, deep in the heart of Roman France. First to point at the site (but not to actually claim it) was Port Moresby, who contributed a picture of it at 1 pm on Wednesday while others were pointing out other Roman arenas. PM was followed by TravelandNature at 11 pm that night—you'll have noted...
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Re: Where We Went: London, Paris, Toronto

PortMoresby ·
What's also interesting about the information is that it's from hotels.com which says in the first line it's helping us find "the best cities around the world". I'm not sure I buy the premise that popular is best. Another index I also find VERY interesting, in the quest to locate interesting places for longer stays on a budget, is the cost of living index for places around the world. While visitor costs and resident costs are not the same, still, it's an interesting tool and also gives us...
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Re: See Them While You Can: 10 Wins for Historic Preservation

PHeymont ·
PM (and anyone else I misled)...I went back and found the link that said "Around the World" on their page was actually another link to the same domestic 10. I've edited the reference out of the clip above. Too bad...I was looking forward to reading it...
 
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