Skip to main content

Tagged With "Lucas Oil Stadium"

Reply

Re: Classic American Cars #5

Travel Rob ·
Impressive WorkerBee,F-car & Rodney Kiser.A relative of mine had a 55 Fair lane.If I remember right, the carb had some kind of oil bath?
Comment

Re: Montreal: Je Me Souviens

arion ·
Re the name "Montreal": there is a town in France with the same name so it is not certain that the City of Montreal is called that because of Mont Royal. Apart from that small quibble, I heartily agree with all you have written about my home city. Oh, wait ... it really isn't so that "almost everyone speaks English quite well". Venture east of Blvd St Laurent and you'll soon find that isn't the case. But then the average visitor, unless by accident, will not find him/herself in the part of...
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

vivie ·
Montreal... my hometown!! When visiting the Olympic Stadium/Botanical Garden you should also take the opportunity to visit the Insectarium, the Planetarium rio tinto alcan and my favorite the Biodome. Information to all these can be found on the same website as the Botanical Garden. Enjoy!
Reply

Re: Gifts to bring back from Portugal or Barcellona

PHeymont ·
I may not be much help, because we tend to send postcards to the grandchildren from each city, with notes about what we've seen and think they would be interested in, and to avoid filling the suitcase with physical items. But for those few things we do buy, we usually go to the market! One of our travel rituals, on the first day when we stock the apartment, is to look for a local preserve or jam that we don't see at home (skyberries in Stockholm, for instance). Once we've found one we really...
Comment

Re: 1000's Drawn to North Dakota

DrFumblefinger ·
Just checked the unemployment rate. North Dakota's is the lowest in the nation. In Aug 2013, it was 3.0%. Neighboring South Dakota's is 3.8%, as it too benefits from the oil boom.
Comment

Re: Norway getting an all-electric fjord ferry

PHeymont ·
Norway's in an odd spot on that: It's one of the world's leading oil suppliers. It's also the case, sometimes, that it's worth moving and concentrating the 'dirtier' parts to keep things clean where the people are. Everything's a balancing act... Like the hydrogen-cell cars I was happily awaiting here in New York, until my wife asked "Do you know where the hydrogen is coming from? How are they producing it?"
Comment

Re: Norway getting an all-electric fjord ferry

DrFumblefinger ·
The modern world still needs oil so I'm glad Norway is able to help add to a world supply that makes us all less reliant on the volatile middle east. But they do have abundant hydroelectricity, as does Canada, and it's places like this that I see as good testing grounds for battery powered experiments like this ferry because charging the batteries here doesn't add much pollution. Hydroelectric dams may be somewhat controversial (what isn't?), but once they're built they generate lots of...
Comment

Re: A Busy Weekend in Philadelphia

GarryRF ·
Philly really is a beautiful city. Its best feature is it's pedestrian friendly. I love the Architecture and the people there. The Football (soccer) stadium too. It has a slower feel compared to New York. No one rushing to get there - like they're late. I like the smaller stores closing at 5. Behind the counter those folks have got families to go home to. And in Philly the folks stop and talk when you need directions. Best and friendliest Airport north of Florida too. It's a shame that...
Comment

Re: Why tickets stay high while fuel prices drop

GarryRF ·
The cost of an Airline Ticket has little to do with the cost of a barrel of oil. That's why I can fly to Sydney Australia for the same price as I can to New York. That's 3500 miles to New York or 10,500 miles to Sydney. Same price. It's solely based on the principle of how much juice you can squeeze from an orange.
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Sept. 4th, 2014: Trabant in Krakow Poland

PHeymont ·
My view: the Trabant was not a good car, but it was a great car. Huh? Well, it didn't have a powerful engine, its oil/gas mixture (like your lawnmower) was noisy and spewed fumes, etc. But, it also showcased a lot of engineering ingenuity and "get by" spirit of its makers. The fiberglass body was a first. The use of recycled materials was decades ahead of the rest of the world. Construction and repairs were simple, perhaps matched only by the Citroen 2CV. And you could never have a failed...
Comment

Re: Gallery: St. Catharines Market, Ontario

DrFumblefinger ·
GarryRF -- They are one of a hundred varieties of squash. I believe you guys on the Isles like to call everything of this type "pumpkin". Excellent in stir fry, in a pasta sauce, or grilled with olive oil and pepper.
Comment

Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#85)

DrFumblefinger ·
Perhaps an entry to a ball stadium
Comment

Re: Dollar Strength Making World Travel Cheaper for Americans

PortMoresby ·
Exchange rates, the price of oil - prices in general go in cycles. We've paid more for a time, now Europeans will pay more for a while and then back again. I'm sure many Americans used the "opportunity" to travel domestically. I have. I'm just glad to see it cycle back in our direction for a while so I can encourage myself to head to Europe. How is Canada faring in the current trend?
Comment

Re: Gasoline Alley: The signs

PHeymont ·
That's a great collection! I remember many of them from childhood trips in the 1950s, and in others I see signs with familiar shapes and designs, but Canadian names...also quite a few that remind us of commercial history...Richfield Oil before Atlantic Richfield before ARCO, for instance. I'm beginning to think my day in Calgary at a teacher conference a few years ago was spent in the wrong part of town!
Comment

Re: Airfares have remained flat for 20+ years

Travel Rob ·
I'm with 90% on that survey. Domestic Airline prices did rise steadily from 2009 to 2014 (even adjusting for inflation) according to the DOT. I do think we've had a price break this year because of the steep drop in oil prices. I'm not surprised most customers feel like they are paying more because of what they are getting now. Planes are packed, there's less seat space and a whole array of fees. http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/airfares/national/chart
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, August 13, 2015: Willie Walleye, Baudette, Minnesota

DrFumblefinger ·
Walleye is the best tasting pan (fried) fish I've ever had. Not hard to make. Lightly breaded, salt and pepper, and fried in butter or canola oil. Largemouth bass are almost as good.
Comment

Re: April 1, 2020: Lynx Family, Alberta

Chris ·
I saw the first one, the mother, on the cutline. Then they started coming out of the bush on both sides. There was also a male a few hundred yards up, so too far to get him into the picture as well. Just goes to show you that the animals can thrive along side oil and gas.
Comment

Re: Lower oil prices disrupting some air routes

DrFumblefinger ·
I suspect the "ruling class" of these countries will do fine, and that those who suffer are the average citizen. It was difficult to buy consumer goods in Venezula before the collapse in oil prices, so it must be impossible to find a sheet of toilet paper in that country now.
Comment

Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

DrFumblefinger ·
Love it! Exactly the type of finding that makes a trip memorable. Something proponents of electric cars seem to forget or choose to ignore -- where does the electricity come from? Currently mostly from coal and oil fired plants, so the practical side of having them for most doesn't currently make that much sense (might as well burn the oil product in the car engine, right). But I am hopeful that was energy technology improves, as it surely will, we'll develop better ways of charging these...
Comment

Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

PHeymont ·
The argument, and I'm not informed enough to judge it, is that the amount of fossil fuel needed to generate electricity for a plug-in is far less than that required to run a gasoline engine. The same sort of argument that points out that a gallon of fuel moves far more freight on a diesel train than a diesel truck. On the other hand, that's about plug-in cars. For hybrids, it's a different story because the batteries charge while the car is running on gas. So less gas is used than using gas...
Comment

Re: easyJet's founder launches cut-rate food store

Travel Rob ·
I really do like this idea because a lot of people are too proud to go to food banks if they are in need and at least they can get a few things there. Also , if it spreads its a good way for travelers to pick up a few snacks for the road. Here are the items for sale listed on the site : Tea Ground Coffee Chicken Curry Sugar Orangeade Pasta Mushroom Sauce Digestives Chick Peas Sardines and Sauce Cream Crackers Pasta Sauce Flour Tomato Ketchup Variety Pack Cereal Potatoes Jaffa Cakes Fruit...
Comment

Re: Baseball Hall of Fame - Cooperstown, New York

Travel Rob ·
Thanks Samantha, I'd love to visit Cooperstown. When I saw Hank Aaron's boyhood home at Mobile's minor league stadium with all it's incredible baseball memorabilia, I knew I had to see the Baseball Hall of Fame one day. Thanks for showing me what to expect!
Comment

Re: Baseball Hall of Fame - Cooperstown, New York

Samantha ·
Hi Rob, it is a really cool place to visit. I had been to the Negro Hall of Fame in Kansas, but not the one in Cooperstown. It was so worth the wait! Thanks for mentioning Aaron's home in Mobile. I would like to see it someday too. Have a great weekend
Comment

Re: Weaker 'loonie' good and bad news for Canada travel

DrFumblefinger ·
With the fall especially of oil prices (and other natural resources, which Canada is a major producer of), the loonie has indeed fallen compared to the US dollar but kept its relative value with most other currencies, including the pound and Euro. It seems despite a reasonably healthy economic profile, including until recently an almost balanced federal budget and low debt-to-GDP ratio, the value of the Canadian dollar is pegged to its natural resource valuation. With the pullback in the...
Comment

Re: Liverpool - What do you mean. It has a Beach ?

DrFumblefinger ·
I live in Calgary now and people often have the impression it's a cowboy town -- which it is, but it's really a modern oil-economy based city as well. A view of the city's skyline. How far away are those beaches from Liverpool itself, Garry? What I most like about them is how uncrowded they are. Is the water warm enough to swim in or only for those with a strong constitution?
Comment

Re: The ART of Chocolate: Brussels, Belgium

GarryRF ·
In 1802 a Menu would refer to anything boiled in water as the Anglaise manner.(English) Likewise anything cooked in hot oil was served in the French manner ! Potatoes or Fried Chicken !!
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 5, 2014: Calgary Prairies

Jonathan L ·
Actually they are "Rapeseed" fields. The word "Canola" was created to sell the oil without using the term "rape" which some people feared might be a turn off to buyers. The rape part of the word actually comes from the latin word rapum which means turnip. The wiki page is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 5, 2014: Calgary Prairies

DrFumblefinger ·
It is, and it isn't. Canola is derived from "rapeseed", but this crop has been genetically modified to take the unpleasant bitterness out of the rapeseed oil by a group of Canadian scientists. Hence, "Can" for Canada, and "ola" for oil. A near perfect lipid profile, and a clear nice taste, and it's inexpensive. I'm a big fan of science! And of canola, the only other cooking oil I use besides olive oil.
Comment

Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 5, 2014: Calgary Prairies

GarryRF ·
There's still quite a debate in Europe over Canola oil. The processing turns the Omega-3 oils into trans-fatty-acids which damage the heart. (Trans means it has a longer shelf life when it comes into contact with oxygen). I still use the Extra Virgin Rapeseed Oil - (cold pressed) We don't see Canola Oil. Most food producers stay clear of it. I love seeing the fields full of bright yellow Rapeseed in the UK. But it makes me sneeze for ages ! Now I know why my car has a pollen filter. Close...
Comment

Re: Leaning Towers: It's Not Just About Pisa!

Jonathan L ·
The Olympic Tower in Montreal was built, among other reasons to house an observation deck (which it still has) and the mechanism for a retractable roof to the stadium next door. This was because the stadium was home to the Montreal Expos and weather in Montreal in April can be a little chilly. Unfortunately the retractable roof never worked (I think it was tried once and jammed) and they had to convert it to a closed dome.
Blog Post

The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

GutterPup ·
  If you follow Interstate 275 south through the city of St. Petersburg, Florida until you run out of land, you’ll be greeted by a gentle slope of road that seemingly rises from the waters of the Tampa Bay. This...
Blog Post

Montreal: Je Me Souviens

DrFumblefinger ·
There are many great cities to visit in Canada, two of my favorites (for different reasons) being Vancouver and Montreal.  Vancouver has one of the most breath-takingly beautiful settings of any city in the world, and I’ll be discussing it...
Blog Post

Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov 29, 2013: Petronas Towers, Malaysia

Mac ·
Based on simple geometric forms of two interlocking squares creating a shape of eight-pointed stars, these futuristic towers soar 88 stories and 452m (1,483 ft) above the street level of Kuala Lumpur, the bustling capital of the south-east Asian...
Blog Post

Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 17, 2013: Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Quebec

DrFumblefinger ·
 Montreal is one of Canada's great cities and one of North America's oldest.  It offers many fun things to see and do and, of course, wonderful food to be enjoyed as Montreal is Canada's capital of cuisine.   One of the more interesting...
Blog Post

Visiting Western Greenland. Part II – Western Greenland on Foot!

Racing_snake ·
Part I covered three Greenlandic towns I have visited but my real passion is being out in West Greenland’s wilderness.  So this part is about what it has to offer those willing to get out there on foot and under canvas!    I...
Blog Post

Virgin Australia & Qantas Drop Prices Because of Oil Prices.

Travel Rob ·
The Australian Airlines Virgin Australia and Qantas announced  a drop in ticket prices because of reduced oil cost. The lower prices follow months of falling oil prices and demands from the British and Australian governments for airlines to pass...
Blog Post

Gumbo's Pic of the Day, February 2, 2015: The Steelpan - National Instrument of Trinidad & Tobago

MAD Travel Diaries ·
   Carnival season 2015 is in full swing. To the world Carnival may be most popular in Brazil, but Trinidad and Tobago has a massive celebration that may just be second biggest. The Carnival season starts immediately after the...
Blog Post

U.S. bad weather, strong dollar = big bonus for Mexico tourism

PHeymont ·
A north-of-the-border 1-2-3 combination of severe weather, cheaper gas and a strong dollar have meant a booming tourist season south of the border, as Mexico is seeing more U.S. tourists than usual, with more money than recently to spend.  ...
Blog Post

Göteborg: Sweden's Second City (Where Gumbo Was, #105)

PHeymont ·
I begin this blog with some odd notes. First, unlike TravelGumbo in his “Where Is” travels, I’ve never been to Göteborg—yet. All, or nearly all, our previous puzzles have been based on the puzzler’s...
Blog Post

Alaska Airlines adds alcohol...to its engines

PHeymont ·
Alaska Airlines is signed up to become the first to use Gevo Inc.s alcohol-based jet fuel as soon as it completes testing and certification. The hope is to be able to reduce pollution, reduce swings in fuel price, and have a steady, domestic source of...
Blog Post

Silk Road becomes the Silk Railway

PHeymont ·
There's a new long-distance champ for rail routes: an 8,077-mile run from Yiwu, China to Madrid, Spain. The first trip took 3 weeks, but that may improve as time goes on. The route will be run twice a month for now, connecting the biggest...
Blog Post

Istanbul: Cruising the Bosphorus

PHeymont ·
One of the classics for visitors to Istanbul—and for quite a few Istanbulis as well—is a cruise up the Bosphorus, the 19-mile strait that connects the Black Sea to the Sea of Marmara, and ultimately the Mediterranean. The Bosphorus is more...
Blog Post

The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

GutterPup ·
By JP Chartier If you follow Interstate 275 south through the city of St. Petersburg, Florida until you run out of land, you’ll be greeted by a gentle slope of road that seemingly rises from the waters of the Tampa Bay. This...
Blog Post

Eating our way through Istanbul (Part 2)

PHeymont ·
Two days and some more touring after our first food walking tour in Istanbul, we were ready for more, and set out on our second. This tour, like the first, was organized by Culinary Backstreets. While the first tour focused on the Beyoglu district...
Blog Post

Do Pets lower Travelers' Stress?

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm a lover of small fuzzy animals, especially dogs (and select cats).  No question in my mind that being around them reduces my stress and puts a smile on my face.      Four Canadian airports, including one in northern Alberta's...
Blog Post

Delta's Cutting International Seats. Will United and American Follow?

Travel Rob ·
Delta is cutting seats for their international routes next winter by 3 percent. A strong dollar and regions that are feeling the decline in oil prices are the markets mainly affected. Service to Africa, Brazil ,India,Japan and the Middle East are...
Blog Post

Gumbo's Pic of the Day, April 28, 2015: Kinbrook Island Provincial Park

Dr.Y ·
  While visiting my daughter in Brooks this past weekend, I was impressed by the ocean-like waves I see in  Kinbrook Island Provincial Park , on Lake Newell! To see such a large lake with beach and ocean-like waves on the relatively dry...
Blog Post

Carnival Celebrations in Trinidad & Tobago

MAD Travel Diaries ·
Carnival is an annual celebration of life found in many countries around the world. It first originated as a pagan festival in ancient Egypt which was subsequently celebrated by the Greeks and then the Romans. Carnival was later adopted by the Roman...
Blog Post

The World's Largest TeePee

DrFumblefinger ·
Situated on an overlook at the outskirts of Medicine Hat, Alberta, the Saamis teepee is the largest of its type in the world.
Blog Post

Louvre Abu Dhabi almost ready to open

PHeymont ·
Five years behind schedule, the Gulf nation's branch of the Louvre opens Nov. 11.
 
×
×
×
×