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Tagged With "Tomb of the Unknown Soldier"

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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

PHeymont ·
It's interesting how we perceive age. In the U.S., we have few buildings over 200 years old, while in other places buildings older than that are part of the housing stock. And here we have a building of intricate design and decoration old enough that we hardly know any of the history of its builders. A reminder to us how much there is to see and know that is beyond our daily lives. Thank you for the tour!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
Perceptions of time ! Interesting subject. You do get a little blasé about History when you're surrounded by it. This is my local Church. It's nearly a thousand years old and still in regular use !
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Age is relative, isn't it? I guess they called it the "New World" for a reason. That's a beautiful church, Garry, and in such a lovely setting. Maybe you can share more about it with us sometime in a POD or short blog post.
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
TravelandNature. You'd be surprised at how many people have been saved by that Church. "Regulars" from hundreds of years ago still attend services and Funerals. Next door to this Church is a Pub and folks come out to catch the last Bus at Mid-night. They often see 8 Nuns in white carrying a coffin through the main doors. Which are still closed - of course!
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

Travel Rob ·
GarryRF was kind enough to take me to that church It's impressive. People just walk old walls too there like it's no big deal. I guess it's really what you're used to
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
Walking the "Walls" that enclose the City - maybe 3 miles around - is a local ritual ! At frequent intervals there are Pubs to stop at. The idea being that you stop at each one , have a drink and proceed to the next. Its only the hardened drinkers who complete the circuit. A friend from Anna Maria Island, Florida sent his daughter to stay with us for a while. Same age as my daughter and they got along like a house on fire ! So when we arrived in Chester I told her our day was walking around...
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

GarryRF ·
On my first visit to Anna Maria I was amazed that the Pelicans would sit next to you on the pier by Allemande Villas. Like a pet dog. They would try and steal your bait as you were fishing. But like a good dog they responded to a "Hey you!" and sat watching you. When I caught my first fish I pulled and fought with the monster! As I lifted my prize from the water my new Pelican friend flexed his wings. He glided off the Pier and with great precision removed my catch from the hook! He passed...
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Re: Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
For those who are interested, we received this link which has some interesting graphics of Newgrange site. http://www.openuniversity.edu/...he-winter-solstice-a
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Re: The Tulou of Fujian Province

PortMoresby ·
No, Rob. Sorry, I don't remember. I read a lot of publications, online and off, and the original picture got lost in the dust of enthusiasm to research logistics. I don't think there's any lack of enthusiasm in the world but that obscure places are getting less obscure every day. What I do think is lacking is imagination. We tend to read about places people have enjoyed, as here on TravelGumbo and follow, rather than setting out for parts unknown. I believe if a place is hard to get to it...
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Re: Where in the World is Travelgumbo? #57

DrFumblefinger ·
One final clue. This following photo is of the second most famous building on the complex. We'll discuss this destination on Wednesday, and have a new puzzle for you on Thursday.
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Re: Visiting Patagonia. 2) Laguna Nimez Nature Preserve, El Calafate

My Thatched Hut ·
Great article. Thanks. I need to go there. The black bird in the water is an Andean Coot. Your grey unknown bird is a Southern Lapwing. Tom
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#340)

Professorabe ·
I wouldn't be lion if I told you that looks like a Roman soldier... Here are the Saturday clues! Two more tomorrow and that's it. But if you've figured out the answer, you can email it to TGSuggestions@gmail.com
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Re: Tanzania 'Clean Cookstove' project: hope and health

Amateuremigrant ·
The day to day lives of villagers in so many countries remains unknown to lots of urban dwellers - the countryside is just where meat on the hoof and charcoal comes from. But simple changes can improve the lives or rural people - imagine trying to study in that smoky hut !
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Re: Tanzania 'Clean Cookstove' project: hope and health

Marilyn Jones ·
You are so right! That's why travel is so important!!
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Re: May 29, 2016 - Grants Tomb

Travel Rob ·
Those are great photos Jonathan! Another place I want to get to!
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Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

TravelingCanuck ·
Fantastic pictures. Thanks for this look at a very interesting and amazing park.
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Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

Travel Rob ·
Wonderful reveal!
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Re: Blickling Estate, Norfolk

DrFumblefinger ·
I'm not sure if there's a country with more unusual old buildings per square kilometer than England. Thanks for sharing this, Ian!
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Re: Blickling Estate, Norfolk

GarryRF ·
Interesting feature indeed Ian. You may be correct DrF. Here's one in Liverpool City Centre - a few miles away.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 24, 2015: Poppies -- Weeping Window at Woodhorn

PHeymont ·
We southern North Americans are not that unfamiliar with the poppies, although perhaps the younger ones...in my childhood and on, they were annually a tradition carried on by the American Legion. Actually, a little research tells me that the tradition started with them in 1921, and then spread to UK and Commonwealth! Here's the text of the poem, written by John McRae, a Canadian soldier and physician: In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place;...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, September 13, 2015: South of Naples

GarryRF ·
Did you discover any wines that you'd like to share ? I love trying a wine that's unknown to me. Like Gancia Asti came as a pleasant surprise.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, September 13, 2015: South of Naples

Non Stop Destination ·
Originally Posted by GarryRF: Did you discover any wines that you'd like to share ? I love trying a wine that's unknown to me. Like Gancia Asti came as a pleasant surprise. I love the Asti wines, and really enjoyed the Chianti wines, but I've forgotten the names of any specific wines I enjoyed in Italy I'm afraid. I do recommend the South African Durbanville Hills Chardonnay
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Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

Neil McAleer ·
Dear Karl - A beautiful sequence of images. I especially enjoyed seeing all the space(s) that you moved into and through and gave to your armchair companions through your fine images. Thank you. I plan to share your experience with my friend Ximena, who is planning to travel to India next year with a group of women friends. All my very best to you, Neil
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Re: Lodi Garden, Delhi (Where Gumbo was #162)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, Neil! Your friend will enjoy India. You just need to be very careful about what you eat and drink. The Lodi Garden is a special spot within Delhi.
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HistoryDigger

HistoryDigger
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Alex D

Alex D
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Re: Experience with hotel bidding sites?

DrFumblefinger ·
Hotwire.com has a generic "star rating" hotel, unknown to you as to which brand and exact location, at discounted prices. I've use them a few times and been satisfied with the results. For example, I got 4 star rooms in downtown Montreal for less than eighty dollars a night, probably a quarter or less of their rack rate. Generally I do like to know where I'm staying, but good luck. Let us know how this works out for you.
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Re: Rio de Janiero - Part 1

Jonathan L ·
The train takes about 25 min each way. Up top 15-45 min depending on how much photography and looking at things you want to do. The unknown is how long the lines are for the train. Early is better than late.
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Re: Historic Route 66 (pt 4) - Gallup to Albuquerque

DrFumblefinger ·
I love scenery like this! That natural bridge was unknown to me, but something else I now need to go see. Thanks for sharing it.
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Recoleta Cemetery, Buenos Aires

DrFumblefinger ·
  Who would have guessed the most expensive real estate in Buenos Aires is found in a cemetery?  Not only is it expensive, there's a line waiting to get in (seriously)!  You actually lease a plot here, as I understand it, and don't...
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The Bovington Tank Museum, Dorset

Mac ·
Almost unsure whether this constitutes a Travel Gumbo "travel" post, I press ahead with my submission and await rapped knuckles from the Senior Gurus! But, first I will bring the big guns to bear with the help of Brad Pitt and his Sherman tank from...
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The Loire River Valley

DrFumblefinger ·
    Many find a visit to the  Loire Valley  to be the highlight of their visit to France, as did we.   When we were planning our journey I discussed our itinerary with my friend, Wayne.  Wayne and his wife had...
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Newgrange; Ireland’s ancient Passage Tomb

DrFumblefinger ·
Newgrange is the oldest structure I've ever visited.  It was built over 5,000 years ago (about 3,200 B.C.) during the Neolithic era, before even Stonehenge or the Great Pyramid of Giza.  It’s obvious that Newgrange was...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Feb 21, 2014: Hadrian's Wall, England

Mac ·
1,450 miles from Rome was the limit of the mighty Roman Empire in 122 AD when the Roman Emperor Hadrian came to Britain and took the decision to build this massive stone wall in order to consolidate his rule and the geographical extent of his Empire....
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Visiting Western Greenland. Part I – Three Towns

Racing_snake ·
In July 2006 I gave in to curiosity and realized my ambition to visit West Greenland.  I returned 6 times in the next 8 years!  I knew that about 10% of the world’s freshwater was sitting on Greenland with the capacity to raise...
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A Visit to Topkapi, Part 1

PHeymont ·
My images of Turkey, before we visited, were a melange of towers and gates—perhaps the one above—mysterious alleys, turbaned sultans, espionage, intrigue and many-minareted mosques. Of course, much of this comes from a bit too much Graham...
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As scheduled Cuba service nears, charter operators face unknown future

PHeymont ·
A surprisingly large industry of scheduled charter flights from the U.S. to Cuba faces an uncertain future as the U.S. and Cuba negotiate their future relationship, including civil aviation, a topic that has already begun to be discussed by the...
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The Nazca Lines, Peru (Where Gumbo Was #115)

DrFumblefinger ·
    Gumbo was driving down the Pan Am Highway in Peru, making his way through the Nazca Desert  along the foothills of the Andes.  This is one of the driest places in the world.   The average rainfall is less than an inch...
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Cruise to set sail with unknown itinerary

PHeymont ·
One of the great perks of a good road trip is not knowing where you'll stop along the way...just where you start and where you end (and sometimes, not even that!) So how about a 10-day cruise on a luxury ship where all you know is where it sales from...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Mar. 29, 2015: J. S. Bach's Tomb

PHeymont ·
This week marks Johann Sebastian Bach's 330th birthday on March 21 or 31, 1685. The difference is due to the change, during his lifetime, from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar. Above, his vault in the floor of the Thomaskirche, Leipzig Germany....
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Underground Puerto Rico: The Camuy River Caverns

PHeymont ·
If Old San Juan and the El Yunque rain forest and the beaches have been drawing visitors for hundreds of years, that's certainly not true for this hidden attraction: a vast, and still-not-fully-explored system of caves, carved out by the world's...
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TravelGumbo Blogger HistoryDigger Wins National Travel Journalism Award

PHeymont ·
We at TravelGumbo are incredibly proud and pleased to announce that Whitney Stewart, HistoryDigger on Gumbo, has won a Bronze Award from the North American Travel Journalists Association for the 8-part series Finding Reiner, which ran  in 2014....
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Gumbo’s Pic of the Day, March 20, 2015: The Cerne Giant

Mac ·
This gentleman is the Cerne Giant, perhaps the most famous and controversial hill figure in the UK. Cut into the chalk downlands onto the hill just outside the village of Cerne Abbas in Dorset, this is just one of 3 ancient figures of this type in...
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A solo female traveler in Palestine

Melissa Douglas ·
Going to an area seldom visited by Americans, Melissa finds unusual sights and new friends.
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Kumano Kodo Pilgrimage (Part 1)

Lisa Day ·
Lisa Day presents the first in a two part series on hiking and experience the Kumano Koda, a pilgrimage trail in Japan.
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Switzerland's world of unusual museums

PHeymont ·
Check in for some of the oddest attractions in a country with well over 1000 museums.
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Early summer - North Yorkshire.

Paul Hunter Landscape Tog ·
Paul Hunter shares some beautiful shots of early summer in his home region of North Yorkshire!
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Svartisdal, Norway, Part 2

Amateuremigrant ·
Bob Cranwell continues his tale of visits to the Svartisdal region in Norway, and some of the potential perils of hiking around this beautiful piece of geography.
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Food Tours of Sicily: Catania

PHeymont ·
PHeymont goes on another food tour, this one in Catania, Sicily, exploring the regional differences among Sicilian cities.
 
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