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Tagged With "Boston Commons"

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Re: January 20, 2020: Newport Beach, California

Travel Rob ·
Also Garry, unlike countries like Japan, it's common here to get a "doggy bag" for leftover food. A lot of people take that home and reheat it for their lunch at work the next day. I found is its pretty easy finding healthy choices in restaurants in the US in bigger cities. The problem can be in rural areas where sometimes all they have is chain and fast food restaurants.
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Re: Boston in the fall - suggestions please!

HistoryDigger ·
Glad you're traveling again, Mac. Boston is my home town, and October is THE BEST MONTH. Where are you staying in the city? I'd walk the Freedom Trail if you're feeling up to it. Go down to the waterfront. Boston Common and Charles Street are fun places to hang out. Newbury Street is fancy shopping and also has a few fun bistros and coffee shops. The Science Museum is excellent. Plenty of seafood to be had. New England clam chowder is great if you have sweater-weather. Go whale-watching...
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Re: Norwegian bank is out of cash, on purpose

Travel Rob ·
On my last trip to London, I arrived at night and the Tube stopped running. The ticket machines for the buses weren't working and now the buses are cashless. Luckily the drivers let me on anyway, but I think as more places don't accept cash ,those type of scenarios will be more common.
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Re: The Best Things To Do In Boston

GarryRF ·
From Logan Airport you can take the Metro into the City. When you've seen enough at the first stop - get back on the Underground system and come up to ground level at the next stop. Repeat as often as time will allow. Great way to spend 8 hours between flights. Only the Bostonian's would drink green beer on Paddy's Day.
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Re: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston MA: Where Gumbo Was (#226)

DrFumblefinger ·
It's a great museum! Well worth at least a day when visiting Boston. Thanks, Jonathan.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
I believe it is an issue of the mountains' origins. A range has a common origin from a common fault line. The Rockies are a fairly new range, and the Porcupines have been around longer and are much more eroded. But I'm not a geologist, PM. I just look at them and think it's all beautiful!
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Re: Gallery: Transport, Rural South China

PortMoresby ·
Don't mistake this lot for an encyclopedic compilation. Buffalo are common and do you remember this? https://www.travelgumbo.com/blog/pod-baganw-oxen
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #11

PHeymont ·
Fortunately for the puzzle...those are very common rocks in quite a few places the Romans (yes, it is of Roman origin) lived and built. Don't you wish you could read that sign to the left? Gumbo checked carefully to make sure you couldn't!
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo #5.5

WorkerBee ·
Interesting clues here but nothing definitive. The vegetation growing through the cobblestones might indicate a moderate climate throughout the year. This path appears to be residential and not one frequented by tourists. Maybe Mediterranean or a colonial city in the Americas. The cobblestones are on the small side and are more common, I think, in southern Europe. Also the light fixtures are a modern design and not typical of a city trying very hard to preserve the old look and feel of the...
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Re: Wow! Iceland Express successor adds U.S. flights

Travel Rob ·
I really am excited about hearing this.I was a big fan of Iceland Express, so I'm hoping Wow will offer the same consistent low prices to North America as they did.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#312)

DrFumblefinger ·
And here are some more puzzle clues. What do all these things have in common and where might you find them gathered together?
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Re: It wasn't scary enough, so now...no floor!

Ava ·
This is becoming more common with some older coasters, and most fans enjoy it. I'm not crazy about it, but at least it's different.
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Re: Wandering In and Around Split

PHeymont ·
Thanks for this! A real reminder of how artificial our categories (Eastern Europe, Western Europe, Mediterranean, etc.) seem when we see how much in common they share!
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Re: Is there Danger in frequent, long-distance travel?

Travel Rob ·
I read about this in the Daily Mail and while I believe there are some medical reasons frequent flying can be dangerous, it failed to show the positives about travel. I too was not convinced about their emotional claims . I found the opposite in my life. "The researchers discovered that new friendships and romantic relationships forged through mobility have a tendency to be situational, expendable and short-lived" "The study found that loneliness and isolation are common among frequent...
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Re: Kyoto Tells Tourists What Not To Do

TravelGirlJenn ·
Wow. Most of the list IS common sense. But tourists don’t always practice common sense, maybe at times myself included. Thing is, I have observed several Japanese tourists doing exactly what they advise not to do on their list during my travels to Europe. :-/ Most recently, almost felt that the rules didn’t apply to them as I was scolded for taking a picture without flash at Sacre-Coeur (didn’t see the sign). That was my mistake. However, while I was getting scolded for my offense, several...
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Re: Signs of Delhi

Amateuremigrant ·
The signage all over India presents marvels of interpretation for visitors and locals alike. Somewhere I have a pic of a sign down an alleyway in Tamil and English "URIN STRICKTLY PROHIBITED" �� - to no apparent effect ! Signage in English is largely because it is the only language understood throughout the country ! When the first Congress convened in 1947, speakers of Hindi, Bengali and Tamil etc eventually agreed proceedings to be held in English - the only common language ! Check out any...
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Re: Back to Oaxaca: Xochimilco

DrFumblefinger ·
I love the colors of the neighborhood. Was this unique to Xochimilco or a common feature in Oaxaca?
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Re: Boston's Beautiful Public Garden

Travel Luver ·
It's a great garden and a wonderful place to go for a walk or jog at the end of a summer's day.
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Re: Walking the Freedom Trail in Boston

GarryRF ·
Must be 15 years since I walked most of your journey through Boston. The mix of old and new buildings are fascinating as you walk the city. Many of the older buildings look like they have shared an architects plan with older buildings here in Liverpool UK. I do find it odd that 5 Bostonians were stoning a single Redcoat then you call them unarmed ! A situation that would bring about the same end results today. I enjoyed your Blog. Thanks.
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Re: Walking the Freedom Trail in Boston

Jonathan L ·
Thanks Gerry. Liverpool is definitely on my list when I get back to the UK. And congratulations on a great 2nd place finish in the EPL.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Nov. 16, 2014: American Golden Plover

My Thatched Hut ·
Yes, Arctic birds are common in southern USA, Central and South America and further north during migration. But to see them in their beautiful breeding colours, you need to go to the Arctic in spring or early summer. This plover had already changed to grey by mid-August.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, November 25, 2014: Fall colors at Upper Kananaskis Lake, Alberta

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi GarryRF, Yes, this part of the world includes vaste stretches of wilderness. Lots and lots of unspoiled mountains, valleys, forests, rivers and lakes. It is only an hour's drive from west Calgary, so lots of those of us who live here spend our weekends in the Rockies. Much like those in Denver. Camping is wonderful in the summertime, as the weather is mild and the days very long. It's also great to hike here at that time. Camping in the winter is only for the brave of heart. You need to...
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Re: Gumbo’s Pic of the Day, November 28, 2014: Postcards from Morocco - the lamp shop

GarryRF ·
Or maybe it's the "Two Nations - divided by a common language" George Bernard Shaw, Winston Churchill and Oscar Wilde all take the credit for that quote.
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Re: Government St., Mobile: A Great Historic Street (Pt. 1)

GarryRF ·
Fascinating look at some American history Rob. I enjoy seeing the similarities in architecture. Many European and American buildings share a common design. It's always interesting to see where the style came from. Each building has a story to tell. Interesting subject Rob.
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Re: Banff National Park: Hiking to Boom Lake

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, GarryRF. Bear attacks are about as common as lightening hitting folks, but it does happen. I've never encountered a bear while hiking except at a distance (could see them across a valley for instance). Here's what you do to be bear safe 1) Follow the park rules. They're very good about placing warnings (eg. trail closed, bear hovering over a carcass) 2) Hike in tight groups of four or more. Bears have never attacked a group of people this large 3) Avoid baby bears. If you see one,...
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Re: Thinking Cuba? Tickets not so easy yet!

GarryRF ·
Mac. Cuba has already changed since my first visit 15 years ago. Buses and cars are everywhere now thanks to those intrepid Chinese salesmen. Living standards are rising rapidly thanks to the tourist dollar. Fields of Sugar Cane are now rare. Castro has decided that Cuba's future lies in tourism. Bicycles prevail in most Towns and a horse and buggy are common. When I first went to Cuba it was painfully poor. It's like going back in time to a 3rd world country. But with safety and very civil,...
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Re: No place like home? 41% of Americans stayed there!

PHeymont ·
You're certainly right about the prioritiess and affordability; I've never understood, for instance, couples who put off having a glorious honeymoon in order to pay for a fancy wedding. Or who save for years for a big trip instead of camping with the kids while they are young... At the other end, though, there are lots of people who've had very hard times the last few years, and may be cashing in vacation time for home repair or mortgage payment. And as for the 20 days (4 working...
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Re: How to Irk the Brits

PHeymont ·
Well, I can see both sides (and have been on both sides). When I stop to take a picture I try to stay out of the way of people trying to pass by...and when the shoe is on the other foot, I try to leave room to avoid ruining someone's picture. A little bit of common courtesy all around makes it all (generally) work...
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Re: Signs of Boston

GarryRF ·
Lovely walkable city. The trains were a great way to get around too. Just move along one station at a time and pop up out of the underground railway for another look around. Around Quincy Market was very strange. It was St Patricks day and the sun was shining. The sellers were wearing shorts and T-shirts. But around the corner the sun hadn't made any impression. It was still in the shade after a long winter. Snow was everywhere and the market traders wore hats and coats. Around the next...
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Re: Signs of Boston

HistoryDigger ·
Thanks for the visual reminders of my hometown. Sigh!
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Re: Signs of Boston

DrFumblefinger ·
There was plenty of snow this time of year and in a week, only a few days where it was nice enough to walk around and enjoy the city. But spring sun is like that. It really warms a sheltered spot, whereas in the north facing shade it's cool and icy.
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Re: Signs of Boston

Mac ·
Fascinating and excellent photos of all the shops - what imagination some folks have!! Thanks for a great report Dr. F.
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Re: Family kicked off flight

PHeymont ·
The most interesting part of the article, to me, was the identification of which language each of the people quoted was speaking...and apparently their words were not falling on deaf ears. Except for the tone-deaf parents (and I'm not usually a parent-basher) who apparently allowed their 3-year-old to decide what rules apply. They should have turned their attention to buckling the child in, and not to arguing with the flight attendant. Perhaps, like the anti-vaccination crowd, they think...
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Re: Books That Sent You Packing (your bag, that is)

PortMoresby ·
I get booksellers' e-newsletters and paper catalogs and run across interesting travel-related items from time to time. Many are on remainder sites so "quantities are limited" but when a post is fresh here, you'll likely get it if you want it. Spotted today in the Daedalus Books catalog is one by Ian Buruma, Bad Elements: Chinese Rebels from Los Angeles to Beijing , " a dissident's eye-view of the world's most secretive superpower, observing, "Strange things happen when Chinese dynasties near...
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Re: Max Gate - home of British author Thomas Hardy

PortMoresby ·
I can't tell you why, DrF, but hiking in mountains interests me not at all. In general, what does interest me is traveling on foot, an ongoing journey. I realize for many, the act of simply being in the outdoors is the joy. But for me it's travel at it's most basic, on foot, from place to place, sleeping, then continuing the onward journey next day and carrying what I need in a small pack. Staying in a B&B may not be exactly basic but carrying camping equipment is beyond me, so my...
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Re: La Vucciria Market, Palermo

PHeymont ·
Can't help wondering at the similarity of the name, allowing for common letter/phoneme substitutes, to La Bouqueria Market in Barcelona. There's not a lot of agreement on where that name came from, by the way, but the best-sounding bet is that it comes from Catalan 'boc' for goat.
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Re: U.S. cuts most Cuba air routes

Professorabe ·
We last visited Cuba in April 2016, just a few weeks after Obama had been there. You could sense the general feeling of optimism amongst the people then. Most thought that their 'little misunderstanding with our neighbour' (a common euphemism for the political situation) had been settled. It's very sad that things have gone right back to the bad old days.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo #362

DrFumblefinger ·
Here are the rest of the puzzle clues for this week. Sorry they have been sporadic -- I've been traveling. There is a lot of information here. Look at it all. What do these things have in common? How are they tied together?
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#322)

DrFumblefinger ·
Here are your next puzzle clues, both buildings from our destination of interest. What might they have in common?
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Re: Homes of Leadville

DrFumblefinger ·
Hi Garry. Regarding your comment, I think the Victorian era was one that was "special" in world history. It was a time when the sun never set on the British empire and the British influence on the world (mostly good in my opinion -- a common language, parliamentary goverance, etc) was at its peak. I don't think we'll have an Elizibethian II era nor a Charles era.
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Re: June 21, 2016: Medieval Budapest in the 21st Century

TravelingCanuck ·
Such an awesome post. For me one of the my favorite parts of travel is imagining the people who lived in the past and think of them in their daily lives. How much do we have in common with them and how much are our lives different then theirs were. Thanks for a great look at the history of Budapest.
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Re: TSA strands 450 overnight: could it get worse?

GarryRF ·
Most countries around the world exchange ideas and processes to fulfil the common good. But some countries refuse to enter into a dialogue and share ideas. Russia is another one.
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Re: France: Baking up a fight over bread and hours

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont -- it's one thing for flights and traffic laws and such to be regulated where there is a greater common good. But the idea of a government regulating when bakers can make bread is absurd in concept and execution. It is this kind of nanny micromanagement that will ruin an economy. Surely the politicians can find better ways to spend their time.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#112)

PHeymont ·
Brush fires are common in its native habitat; one of its characteristics is that it's fire-resistant. It's also resistant to deer (or anything else that doesn't want to get cut on sharp edges!)
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Re: U.S. regs may delay Norwegian's Cork-Boston route

Travel Rob ·
Norwegian Air Shuttle got their EU flight license approved for their Irish subsidiary airline ,Norwegian International ,in Feb. 2014. Under the Open Skies agreement, they should be allowed to fly between EU countries and the US. How the DOT is justifying taking over two years to approve their foreign carrier permit, when it normally takes a month, I don't know.
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Re: U.S. regs may delay Norwegian's Cork-Boston route

GarryRF ·
What was that song ? "Money makes the world go round" Well apparently it doesn't. Looks like another case of someone playing "Dirty Pool"
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Re: Boston Public Library (Where Gumbo was #150)

Travel Rob ·
What an amazing library! I look forward to seeing it. It is amazing how many of us love libraries. So far,my two favorites are both in Manchester, England.
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Re: Boston Public Library (Where Gumbo was #150)

GarryRF ·
And lets not forget Melvil Dewey - a Librarian in the North-East USA who invented the Dewey Decimal System (1876) which is now used in more than 135 Countries ! A wonderful collection of photo's. Love architecture.
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Re: An English Garden Gallery: Hidcote

PortMoresby ·
Yes, a common plant with an uncommon coloring. I'm partial to the fern.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec 20, 2013: Hot Horses - even horses need an ice cream sometimes....

Mac ·
The horses (probably only some 10 plus a donkey) and some 50 cattle are allowed to roam and graze totally free (restrained only by cattle grids on the surrounding roads) for around 8 months of the year. Theoretically only animal owners with ancient "Commoners Rights" linked to ownership of old properties in the immediate vicinity of the Common are permitted to release their animals to graze free in this way. The present purpose of the animals roaming in this way is supposed to be keeping...
 
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