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Tagged With "Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum"

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Re: April 15, 2018: Pittsburgh Panther

George G. ·
Glad you made it to my hometown. I was there a few months ago and also snapped a few photos of the Pitt Panther. Did you get to the Frick or the Carnegie Museum nearby? Lots of connections between your hometown of NYC and Pittsburgh during the industrial gilded age.
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Re: Toronto's Bata Shoe Museum

George G. ·
Amazing how footwear has migrated from a protective functional item to a fashion status industry, though many sports and health industries still focus on function and comfort. Sounds like this museum is a must see place in Toronto based on your great photos. Lots of golf spike shoes in my collection that my wife hopes will shrink.
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Re: Nov. 13, 2017: Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris

Samantha ·
Hi DrFumblefinger, Monet is my favorite impressionist artist and loved this museum. We actually had to go back to Paris 3 times to be able to visit It was closed for renovations when we were there in 1999, and 2001. It wasn't until 2006 that we were able to see it. FINALLY. Happily I can say photography wasn't prohibited then, so I was able to take the attached picture of us. It was truly amazing and your post brought back many wonderful memories. Thank you for sharing.
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Re: Nov. 13, 2017: Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris

PHeymont ·
Actually, you're both right...it just depends on when the visit was. French museums in recent years have shifted photography rules; at one time Musée d'Orsay and the Louvre were on opposite ends of the issue. Eventually, in 2014, the Ministry of Culture and a group of museum officials worked out a charter that encourages visitors to respectfully take pictures in museums and monuments, but allows measures such as banning selfie sticks, or pictures on loan from owners or museums who refuse...
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Re: Prague's Jewish Quarter: An Emotional and Educational Journey

Amateuremigrant ·
Such places have a much deeper impact, even, than the actual lives lost. It is an example of what Alisdair Maclean called 'cultural erosion'. Places, activities, landmarks all lost to future generations from the memories of those gone. I remember discovering a small forgotten Jewish cemetery at Tokay, Hungary on the confluence of the Tisza and Bodrog rivers. Many locals had no knowledge of it a mere 300 metres (across the river) from the main street.
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Re: Amsterdam councillors: cheap visitors, stay home!

GarryRF ·
It's because the beer, dining, hotels, museum, coffee shops and the red light district are so expensive we can't afford to stay longer. Perhaps Udo Kock should change the image of Amsterdam away from drugs and prostitution so that the more discerning traveller - like myself - would make it a week instead of a weekend.
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Re: Cables mapped: How you're connected to the world

PortMoresby ·
Very interesting. For those particularly interested in the history of the subject, there's a lovely little museum on Valentia Island in SW Ireland dedicated largely to commemorating the first successful transatlantic cable which I visited while staying with a friend there. Near the Skelligs if you need another reason to go. http://www.valentiaisland.ie/e...tia-heritage-centre/
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Re: June 23, 2017: The Shortest River in the World!

DrFumblefinger ·
It looks like you could wade the entire length of the river!
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Re: April 24, 2018: Thirsty?

PHeymont ·
And not the first time for a toilet as a museum exhibit. The Guggenheim in New York last year had a solid-gold working replica by Maurizio Cattelan, entitled America, that could be used by visitors. And, famously, in 1917, Marcel Duchamp challenged concepts of art and esthetics by exhibiting a 'readymade,' a standard urinal turned on its edge, signed as if by an artist, and labeled... Fountain.
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Re: From the Shoebox: Germany in the early 60s

George G. ·
Looked up one more. The one with the river barge is taken from Heidelberg looking across the Neckar River. I was able to match up some of the structures from then and now. I once tried to rent a top floor apartment on that side of the river back in 1990.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? #62

Roderick Simpson ·
My first thought was the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, but from what I remember, it was on a river, not a harbour. I still favour a fishing port with some yachts, possibly in Northern Spain. However, I may be literally half a world away!
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo (#38)

PHeymont ·
Here's a view of the other side of the station...economizers once wanted to remove these beautiful fixtures, but after protests, they were restored instead. When the railroad first opened in this town, half the population were on "poor relief;" the railroad enabled its goods to sell over a wider area and made the town prosperous.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #40

Mac ·
Huuummm... I think I recognise those roofs... Could it be close by a river?
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #40

DrFumblefinger ·
To answer some of the questions raised and hopefully move this along, here's some new info: 1) Jonathan L, of these two countries is correct. But we need something more specific than that. 2) Mac, you are one of the most traveled people I know so I believe you'd recognize any roof you'd seen before. And it is close to a major river 3) PHeymont, it's in a large city So where exactly is Gumbo?
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? #40

Andre Pur ·
It's near one river which name starts with C?
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Re: Krumlov Castle, Český Krumlov, Czech Republic. Where Gumbo was #68

Roderick Simpson ·
I first visited Cesky Krumlov in 1995, when it was still being restored and the tower repainted, as it had deteriorated during the communist period. I would also advise anyone visiting the area also to see nearby Rozmberk, which is a pretty village with a quite impressive castle, but with far fewer tourists (First 2 pictures). Prague is rightly considered one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, but there is much more to see in the Czech Republic including Cesky Krumlov and South Bohemia.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#69)

PortMoresby ·
While I do see a certain resemblance to Cappadocia, it doesn't look real to me. More like a model landscape, as you'd have with a model railroad, but seemingly without the railroad. Maybe this is, in fact, what Cappadocia looks like from a hot air balloon, which I understand are popular there. I see no evidence of people in the form of actual people or vehicles, unless that's a person in red in the lower right-hand corner.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, November 7, 2014: Deuce with Truck

GarryRF ·
Driving the length of the River Rhine was my favourite journey. From historic Amsterdam to the Cuckoo Clock Houses of Switzerland. So much to see and do. From industrial to snow topped mountains. Recommend it to anyone who wants a taste of Europe.
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Re: The Getty Villa, Part 2: The Art

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comments, PM. It is a fascinating collection, very extensive and thorough. What I was striving for in this piece is to give the reader a sample for what's there and why the museum is worth visiting. My favorite piece of the ones in this gallery is the toy, the very last one. I can imagine some father lovingly crafting it for his child. The glass products amazed me. Several of the sculptures were grand, especially the one of Hercules (which Getty was very proud of), but the...
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Re: Visiting historic Skagway, Alaska

DrFumblefinger ·
I enjoyed this piece, Tom, and find the little town of Skagway charming if there's no cruise ships around. Make sure if you visit that you also go to the town's little cemetery and see if you can find the grave marker of the villainous Soapy Smith. There was a different way to reach the Klondike in addition to those Tom writes about, which while safer was not very successful. That involved sailing all the way up the coast of Alaska, entering the mouth of the Yukon river and navigating...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? #78

PortMoresby ·
Oh, my favorite! The Mystery Museum. You know, the one with the...um, um... And a dome.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Mar. 1, 2014: Details, Charleston P.O.

DrFumblefinger ·
The details in that post office are grand! Like stepping back to a time when fine detailed craftsmanship still mattered. The post office has a small but interesting museum worth a quick visit as well.
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Re: Taos NM - Indian, Mexican, and Yarn

Jonathan L ·
Going to Taos, for me is a lot like going to Banff. How long you want to stay depends on how much you want to do. I would say 2-3 days minimum to get a feel for the town AND go to the Taos Pueblo, which I didn't write about because we didn't have time to go this trip. The Pueblo is a must see. The rest depends on how many hikes and river rafting trips and other outdoor stuff you want to do. As for the tee-shirt, well, it wasn't design for men orginaly so......
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Re: Salt River Tubing -- Mesa, Arizona

PHeymont ·
Sounds like my kind of river cruise. It's fun in cooler climates, too: my experiences have been on the upper reaches of the Delaware, but the feeling of just "being there" must be similar!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo, #53

PHeymont ·
Hmmm....Europe (rooflines), hillside, recent growth (larger buildings at back), small river (canal?)...Lots of clues, but no connection coming to mind!
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Re: America's Best Ice-Cream Shops? Tell us yours...

Travel Rob ·
As a kid, I always enjoyed Green Tea Ice Cream from restaurants in Little Tokyo,Los Angeles. When i last went to Little Tokyo,I tried a little dessert shop in a mini mall there, Mikawaya, and loved it. They give you just a little, but the price is a $1.00 Mikawaya http://www.yelp.com/biz/mikawaya-los-angeles
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Re: HOW YOU CAN SAVE THE ASIAN ELEPHANT

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for sharing these thoughts. Elephants are highly intelligent animals, probably smarter than dogs for example. Wild elephants in Asia are having a hard time because of loss of habitat and conversion of their normal range to agricultural land. Most do not have ivory tusks so unlike their African cousins, they are not slaughtered for their teeth. In Sri Lanka I visited the elephant orphanage in Pinnawala a number of times, which I've previously written about on TravelGumbo at this link .
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Re: Serra's Church, Mission San Juan Capistrano, California. Where Gumbo Was #46

PortMoresby ·
Somewhere I've got a snapshot of a very young me with a tiny lady holding an object who had insisted my friend take our picture in the garden together. It was in the village of Petra, Majorca and she officiated at the small museum commemorating Junipero Serra's birthplace. I was spending the summer on the island and every student educated in California knows his name almost as well as their own. The address of my high school was El Camino Real, Father Serra's road from mission to mission and...
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#54)

PHeymont ·
Could this be a display in a science museum? It's either that or art!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#54)

DrFumblefinger ·
It is not in a museum of any type, although this place has a lot of interesting modern art. It is not an airport. Lynn Millar, those may be slot machines in there. Does that help?
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Re: Bones Recreated Using 3D Printer, What Would Richard Have Thought?

PHeymont ·
I think this kind of took a turn for me, with Jurassic Park on one side, along with displaying a replica of a king's skeleton, and on the other side a technique for better producing museum exhibits that would otherwise be more difficult to create.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#72)

PortMoresby ·
Paris has the Metro & the RER and I've been in at least one above-ground Metro station, but I'd be hard pressed to remember which. I think the RER is entirely above ground outside the city, and the occasional one in town, at least one along the river.
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Re: Welcome to the town of Dawson City, Yukon

DrFumblefinger ·
That's the nature of gold boom towns, PHeymont. I believe another gold vein had been found in Alaska near the mouth of the mighty Yukon River, and most of the Klondike prospectors flowed downriver to it. I've been fascinated by the Klondike gold rush since I was a school boy in Canada, reading the writing of Pierre Burton (famous Canadian author, former resident of Dawson City, whose father was one of those who came here during the Klondike Gold Rush and unlike most stayed in Dawson). On the...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec 4th, 2014: A Ride to Paradise

PHeymont ·
A favorite with my kids when they were young (and with me!) Nearby, there is the Pennsylvania state railroad museum and the National Toy Train Museum, as well as all the attractions of Lancaster County "Amish Country." Thanks!
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Re: Major New Entrant in Cruise Business

PHeymont ·
It really is a growing business...and another recent "big" entrant would be Viking, which is expanding from its River Cruise business into Sea Cruises. I'm sort of amazed that none of these companies has thought of licensing the 1959 hit in which Frankie Ford pleaded "Let me take you on a sea cruise" for an ad. For those of you too young to remember (is that possible?) here it is....with a funny intro.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, November 27, 2014: The Feast!

Travel Rob ·
Wow, Ottoman! Don't know if I've ever said this especially with desserts,but that food looks too good to eat. It should be displayed in a museum!
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Re: Cruising down the Nile (part 2)

PHeymont ·
Your pictures really bring out what I learned—and taught—in school: how narrow a margin of arable soil along the river was able to feed a great civilization, and how close desert and disaster were if the flood and the crop failed. But where it is lush...I had no idea how lush!
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Re: Cruising down the Nile (part 2)

DrFumblefinger ·
I want to go on a Nile River cruise!!! Mac, if you were satisfied with them, would you mind sharing the company you used for this trip? A little on the logistics (where you meet, how long it was, etc). Appreciate that! Thanks for this series.
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Re: Cruising down the Nile (part 2)

Mac ·
Hi Karl - sorry for a delayed reply. We booked onto a Thompson Holidays trip out of London and were very satisfied with the whole experience, including value for money. We chose the "all inclusive" option and were very pleased with the quality of their wines etc. The boat was very clean and well maintained, all the crew cheery and pleasant, the food good and plentiful (buffets). There were a good number of "included" trips to temples whilst other trips were extras (Abu Simbel and Cairo for...
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Re: Cruising down the Nile (part 4)

PHeymont ·
I've really enjoyed this journey...thanks! For anyone who hasn't, I'd suggest checking out the first 3 parts as well. It's amazing to realize how varied the architecture and the wildlife and even the river itself seem at different points along the way. Some of the variation serves to remind us, as well, how many many years went into all this; all of our civilizations are young by comparison, no matter how old they seem to us!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#39)

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont can be such a tease at times... I'll go out on the limb and suggest these are the "truths" 1) It is a model train set -- very nicely done, by the way 2) It is in a formal display somewhere. Mac said " I have seen reports of some fantastic layouts in Germany". A model trail museum in Europe, possibly Germany? Anyone else have any ideas?
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#39)

Mac ·
Right, time to stick my neck out (again...). I'm going for the picture being part of the world's biggest miniature railroad layout located in Nothlandz, Flemington, New Jersey. I have seen write ups for a large German layout but I think it is nowhere near as big or as complete as this! There PH! Shoot me down my friend!!
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo? (#39)

PHeymont ·
Sorry, Mac...but it's not Northlandz. Sorry, DrF...it's not the National Toy Train Museum Sorry, JonathanL...it's not the annual display at the Bronx Botanical Garden But you are all in the right country!
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Re: London- multiple questions

PHeymont ·
I can only help with one of the questions...but GarryRF, one of the TG Gurus, lives in Liverpool and can certainly help with that part. For Stonehenge without a car, there are really two main options. There are a number of tour operators who run coach tours from London to the site; or you can take a train from London to Salisbury and take a bus from the station to the Stonehenge visitor center. The visitor center is new since I was there; it's about 10 minutes by shuttle from the stones...
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Re: Old San Juan - Museo de las Americas is a Must See

DrFumblefinger ·
I've only briefly visit Old San Juan once (part of a cruise), and it did fascinate me. Thanks for tell us about this great museum, Jonathan. It does sound like a MustSee! Conde Naste just did a brief piece calling Puerto Rico the new Caribbean hot spot. Here's a link to their piece.
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

PortMoresby ·
One more for the list of wonderful things to see, the world's largest pinhole photograph at Washington D.C.'s National Air & Space Museum. So many things, so little time.
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Re: The Banff Park Museum National Historic Site. Where Gumbo was #(133)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for your comment, Vagabond. It is a great place to take kids, who are fascinated by all the displays. But even as an adult, it was fascinating to take this step back in time to how a Natural History Museum presented information 100 years ago.
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Re: The Banff Park Museum National Historic Site. Where Gumbo was #(133)

TravelingCanuck ·
Thanks for the trip down memory lane. Its been several years since I have even been to Banff and I haven't been to the museum since the early 80s. It is a nice look at the old Banff before it exploded into the mass tourist site it is now. I will have to revisit the museum in the near future.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#126)

HistoryDigger ·
Curiouser and curiouser! American West, I'd say, because of the four-legged creature. All those gables? Now, is that a lodge or a museum of some sort?
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, February 25, 2015. St. Augustine, Florida

TravelingCanuck ·
Thanks for the memories. I remember visiting St Augustine on a family vacation in the early 70s. My favorite sites were the old fort and the Ripleys museum.
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