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Tagged With "Buffalo to Los Angeles"

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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

PortMoresby ·
DrF, I'm guessing the answer is a straightforward geologic issue, but can you tell me what determines whether the hills are part of, or alternatively simply adjoin, the mountains? All VERY interesting!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
I believe it is an issue of the mountains' origins. A range has a common origin from a common fault line. The Rockies are a fairly new range, and the Porcupines have been around longer and are much more eroded. But I'm not a geologist, PM. I just look at them and think it's all beautiful!
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

PortMoresby ·
A good answer - scientifically & emotionally! Thanks again.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

Jonathan L ·
I loved Head Samshed In when I visited it. Definitely a must see if you get to that part of the world. If you do also go to the Frank Slide site. A massive land-slide took placein the 1920's (I think). i will find one of my photos.
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Re: Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump (That's really its name)

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comment, Jonathan. The Frank Slide is in the Crowsnest Pass area and it's very interesting to see. Beautiful valley as well with a lot of mining history
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Re: Lighthouses of Lake Havasu – Part 2 of 3

DrFumblefinger ·
Makes me want to go out, buy an RV and go see all the lighthouses in the world! I love lighthouses, and to have so many in one place, even if they're "just" replicas, is great! Thanks, Samantha.
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Re: Lighthouses of Lake Havasu – Part 2 of 3

RoadWorrier ·
Cool idea, lighthouses all over. Do boaters on the lake count on them, or just for fun?
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Re: Lighthouses of Lake Havasu – Part 2 of 3

Samantha ·
They are cool to see. Some are just for fun, but many of them do actually light up to help the boaters.
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Re: South Dakota (yes!) has booming tourist year

DrFumblefinger ·
The western part of the state is really beautiful, and the plains have their own magic. I'm not surprised by this news. There's a lot to see and do in "flyover country".
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Re: Why You should visit Nevada's Valley of Fire

DrFumblefinger ·
You are correct, GarryRF. There have been a number of movies filmed in the park. Lifted straight from Wikipedia , here is a listing of these: Film History : Valley of Fire is a popular location for shooting automobile commercials and other commercial photography. It has provided a setting for the following films and television shows: The Professionals with Burt Lancaster , Lee Marvin , and Claudia Cardinale was filmed in 1966. As of November 2012 a piece of the movie set is still up for...
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Re: JetBlue aims Buffalo-LA flight at Canadian flyers

DrFumblefinger ·
There's a fair bit of competition for Canadians at the Buffalo airport. My cousin lives near Niagara Falls and often uses Buffalo as her preferred departure airport. Given her close proximity, it makes a lot more sense than driving to Toronto, which is about as popular with Canadians as JFK and LAX are with Americans.
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Re: easyJet's founder launches cut-rate food store

GarryRF ·
Stelios is a clever man. Lots of free advertising for a new cut price food store. Many basic items such as sugar - tea - canned drinks - bottled water - beer - vegetables and milk can be found below 25 pence / 35 cents in lo-cost stores in the UK already. And next month when it all goes to 50 pence he'll once again be on a winner !
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

Former Member ·
I've often advised travelers with jam-packed itineraries to step back and leave themselves time to take a walk in a park or sit there a while, experiencing what the locals see and do. That is absolutely excellent advice. I hope that most people were wise enough to take your advice. Many of my best trip memories are made of such stuff. Thank you so much, PHeymont, for this walk in the park. It is just what my jangled nerves needed today.
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

PortMoresby ·
I suspect a walk in the park is a habit acquired over time and familiarity with a place. I have a feeling, too, that the urge to go at top speed is the initial and overriding one. Or is it years and not travel experience that slows us down enough for such places to finally come into focus? Looking back over the decades I think maybe it's the latter.
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

DrFumblefinger ·
I do think people's perspectives and priorities change with time. For example, I care little about a bar or nightlife scene in most of my destinations nowadays; that mattered more to me when I was much younger. I have always loved walking in parks because of the beautiful gardens, etc. But I think i'm much more into people watching in these places than I used to be. One of my favorite places to visit is the provincial park a short block from my home. It's grand to go for a walk in it, see...
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

PortMoresby ·
Maybe travel advice of the very concrete sort then, hotels, trains, etc. is the most satisfying for all concerned. A suggestion to slow down just may not compute, something for each of us to discover on our own. So PHeymont may be preaching to the choir...may he continue.
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Good advice is good advice. People can accept it or ignore it. I'm all for freedom of choice. But sometimes an alternative needs to be presented in a clear way, as PHeymont has nicely done in this piece.
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

PortMoresby ·
I don't disagree. Just pointing out the nature of human beings and, like world peace, we can wish for it while not actually expecting everyone to join in. But lessons are learned from war too and how would we feel about every tourist in town flocking to OUR park.
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

GarryRF ·
I've mentioned in other pages that I love wide open spaces - like the State Delaware Park - but the designer of New York Central Park rung a Bell with me. Frederick Olmsted came to Liverpool to check out the "Peoples Garden" and he wrote in 1850 : "Five minutes of admiration, and a few more spent studying the manner in which art had been employed to obtain from nature so much beauty, and I was ready to admit that in democratic America there was nothing to be thought of as comparable with...
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

Former Member ·
It is clear that the "dumb" animals always seem to know the best places to hang out. We can never have enough parks. Nice to read that Frederick Olmsted also knew a good park when he saw one. Thanks for that info GarryRF
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

PHeymont ·
Garry's note about Olmsted's travels (and he was quite a traveler) set me off on a quick look to find the park he was referring to (which I didn't; apparently "people's garden" was a description rather than a name?) and found that Liverpool has more parks and especially top-class parks than any British city besides London. The article also mentioned that for reasons of health—and keeping social unrest down—the city commissioners set out on a park-building spree starting about 1833. Many...
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

GarryRF ·
Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

PHeymont ·
Even a certain similarity of shape...
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

GarryRF ·
Another Park from the 1850s. People would escape Liverpool for the day and travel north to Hesketh Park. 20 minutes on the train. This is taken in Mid-Winter.
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by Grouchy Gumbo: The last pic is of my cousin Priscilla, who lives in Prospect Park. I see that you gave her a little gnosh. Not that she needs it. She seems to be putting on a little extra "winter coat" this year. She has a fine home. I would really like to visit the park sometime. Grouchy, I'm curious how a squirrel manages long distance travel to visit relatives. Maybe you can enlighten us mere mortals.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#75)

Lynn Millar ·
Observations or random guesses: Christian (cross), Spanish (garb of non-angel statues), not a huge cathedral (scale) nor a wealthy one (bare stone work and growth on spires along railing). No ideas on beverage link or fortification.
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ET, Call Home: A visit to the Arecibo Observatory

PHeymont ·
On our recent visit to Puerto Rico, we took an unplanned side trip to what might be called ET’s phone booth—a vast radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory that “listens” to space both for astronomical information and any...
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Old San Juan: Beautiful...and not all old

PHeymont ·
San Juan, Puerto Rico is a city of contrasts, of modern skyscrapers, crowded residential areas of different eras, resort hotels and casinos along Condado, and much more...but the image that usually comes to mind is really that of Old San Juan, the...
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A Road Trip Gallery: Fort Mason Community Garden & the Man in Pink

PortMoresby ·
  March 12, 2015   I discovered the community garden on this visit to Fort Mason, having missed it the first time I stayed at the hostel.  I walked in, looking around for possible subjects, and didn’t notice the thin man in a...
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Enjoying the Wonderful Sites in Zacatecas, Mexico

My Thatched Hut ·
Millions of tourists visit Mexico every year, mostly in the winter as people like to get away from the freezing temperatures and snow in the north.  Almost all of these people visit the tourist cities of Cancun, Acapulco, Cabo San Lucas,...
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When the weather gives you lemons, try an icecycle!

PHeymont ·
No, that's not a misspelling, but it isn't the word the inventor of Ice Bikes used to describe her new-fangled winter contraption.   Photo: Water Bikes of Buffalo   Buffalo, NY is known for cold, and the Buffalo River and sometimes parts of...
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Jerez Cathedral and Neighbors: Where Gumbo Was (#75)

PHeymont ·
  Frequent-solver Roderick Simpson identified Gumbo's locale as the Cathedral of Jerez, in Spain. Another frequent contributor to the solutions spotted lots of clues: Spanish garb of non-angel statues, size not huge and cathedral not wealthy...
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Charleston's Cathedral of St. John the Baptist: Where Gumbo Was (#76)

PHeymont ·
  Visiting Charleston recently, I was struck by its handsome cathedral and unusual spire. The church seems reasonably well-rooted in the 19th century, but the tower reminded me of the turn-of-the-last-century church of Saint-Jean-de-Montmartre ...
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A Tale of Two Cathedrals - Palermo Italy

Jonathan L ·
Palermo, Sicily has two beautiful cathedrals, less than three miles apart. Jonathan L explores them both and explains their history.
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Valley of the Temples, Agrigento, Sicily

PHeymont ·
Agrigento, Sicily's Valley of the Temples is the world's largest archaeological site, and its mysteries are also immense. PHeymont visited and reports.
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Journey through Karnataka: Bijapur and Gulbarga

Professorabe ·
Professor Abe's journey continues into Northern Karnatka, from Badami to Bijapur and then on to Gulbarga. There are a large number of Muslims in the region.
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California Gardens 2017: Filoli, the House

PortMoresby ·
This week PortMoresby introduces us to a long-time favorite, magnificent Filoli, in Woodside, California.
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Sept. 24, 2017: Lake Asal, Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

Grand Escapades ·
Grand Escapades provides today's Pic of the Day of Lake Asal, a salt lake in Ethiopia's Danakil Depression.
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Apr. 17, 2017: Melting House at Gare du Nord, Paris

PHeymont ·
An art installation that accompanied the Paris Climate Conference serves as a reminder, and also mirrors its surroundings.
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December 10, 2019: Education is the New Buffalo, Calgary

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger shares photos of an interesting work of art he discovered while exploring Calgary's new Central Library.
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Koblenz: At the German Corner

PHeymont ·
Join PHeymont for a stroll through Koblenz's Old City and a bit of history and art.
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Alpacas lost and found at hotel

PHeymont ·
More bizarre lost and found items, this time at a hotel chain.
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April 4, 2020: 1886 Buffalo Cafe, Calgary

DrFumblefinger ·
DrFumblefinger visits an older building in Calgary. Originally home to a lumber and power company, today it houses a popular breakfast spot.
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Cody Park, North Platte, Nebraska

Samantha ·
Samantha shares some pictures of Cody Park in North Platte, Nebraska with her nephew Jesse, who is related Cody.
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The Knife Angel, Gateshead

Ian Cook ·
Ian Cook shares the story behind the Knife Angel, accompanied by lots of great photos.
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A Visit to Normandy: Magnificient Mont St. Michel

DrFumblefinger ·
(Mont St. Michel, viewed from pastoral Normandy) As we drive through the pretty farmland of Normandy, with its pleasing apple orchards and pastures dotted with sheep and dairy cows, it’s easy to forget this region’s turbulent past....
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South Dakota (yes!) has booming tourist year

PHeymont ·
Not a place whose tourism industry often makes the headlines, but South Dakota's tourism is really on a roll this year. Literally a roll in one instance: It's the 75th anniversary Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, and it's expected to be the biggest ever....
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Buffalo Bill Cody's Grave, Lookout Mountain, Golden, Colorado

Ottoman ·
  William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody (February 26, 1846 – January 10, 1917) was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Clair, a small town in the Iowa Territory (now the U.S. state of Iowa), but he grew up for...
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Cozumel, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico: Coral, Currents, and Clear waters

Goni ·
  What to see: coral pinnacles, walls, caverns, tunnels and crystal clear waters. Nurse sharks, turtles (hawksbill, loggerhead, green), spiny lobsters, crab, sting rays, variety of tropical fish like queen angelfish, schools of jacks, endemic...
 
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