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Tagged With "Star Wars"

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Re: Nov. 12, 2016: Memorial to Women of WW II, London

GarryRF ·
The Cenotaph in London is a remembrance of all the war dead from all the British Empire. Canada, India, Australia, South Africa and many more. They all send servicemen to represent their own countries in a march past. Did you know that Belgium has a parade of armed soldiers at the London Cenotaph too ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iT6ChvVoPNQ
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Re: December 12, 2016: Percheron Horses, Alberta

GarryRF ·
Wonderful work horses with a positive future. Known for their cool temperament and strength these animals are used by police in cities where heavy traffic doesn't distress them.. For over 200 years breeders have a kept stud records and kept the breed pure. As you say they were a war horse too. A million were left in France by allied troops after WW1. And unfortunately France has a "taste" for horse meat
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Re: Norwegian bank is out of cash, on purpose

PHeymont ·
I think what we're seeing here is a blindness in planning, which goes beyond questions of technology. You've identified some scenarios where cashless becomes hopeless/helpless. I see the same kind of lack of forethought when I see several huge residential towers being built in downtown Brooklyn...on top of already overcrowded subway stations, and with no forethought to larger sewer or water connections... In the bleakest possible view, we may self-destruct not through a world war, but...
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Re: St Stephen's Green, Dublin. (Where Gumbo was #137)

PHeymont ·
I have to admit that the first clue reminded me, in succession, of a spot in Parc des Buttes-Chaumont in Paris, of Prospect Park in Brooklyn and of Frogness Park in Oslo...it was only when the clues got more specific that I could rule them out, and only when the Fusiliers Arch appeared and I could search its text that I could find the answer. That arch, by the way, provoked a lot of controversy when erected in 1907; it memorializes a regiment in England's colonial war against the Dutch Boers...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, July 13, 2015: Gettysburg at dusk

Jonathan L ·
If you are going to Gettysberg, I highly recommend also seeing the Anteitam battlefield. It is about an hour's drive away, and well worth the trip. I would probably do Anteitam first as it the battle there was about a year earlier in the war.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I never try to judge historic figures through the prism of modern values. Remember in the 18th century slavery was a global institution -- absolutely every country in the world had slaves. And being from Virginia, he knew the southern states wouldn't join northern colonies in forming a new country without slavery being allowed, so I don't think he thought it was time to fight that fight. I think he valued the formation of the new country above all else -- risking his life to do so...
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Re: Films that affected your Travel destinations

Dan Carter ·
Casablanca...and it's funny, but it didn't make me want to go to Casablance, it made me want to go to "Paris before the war." And if Ingrid Bergman could be there with me...
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Re: Films that affected your Travel destinations

Former Member ·
Oh, yes, indeed - The Road pictures had a quirky playfulness that made one curious to get out and see things. You thought "if those mixed-up people can do it, I can do it.". Casablanca had that "je ne sais quoi" that made you want to see "Paris...before the war". Thanks for the memories about the movies.
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Re: Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other. (Part 5) The Elephants of Pinnawala

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks, PortMoresby! And we've not even been to the sacred tooth relic in Kandy, the medieval ruins of Polonnaruwa, the beautiful hill country filled with tea plantations and "The World's End", a wildlife safari at Yala National Park, nor any of the nice beaches (but keep reading -- reports on these are coming). Sri Lanka is a great destination, especially now that the civil war is over. I was doubly lucky to not only be able to visit a dear friend there but to have time to leisurely explore...
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Re: United's Award Chart: Premium Award Cost Goes UP

DrFumblefinger ·
I've seen a lot of "award creep" in my days, and I think there's more to come. A "mile" is worth less and less all the time. It's clear that airline miles aren't worth banking for any period of time. Use them when it's logical to do so. They likely will be worth less in the near future. Thanks for the link, PHeymont.
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Re: United's Award Chart: Premium Award Cost Goes UP

PHeymont ·
Not sure I agree with the "burn 'em" philosophy. At the premium class end, there's certainly been a lot of creep, but not so much in coach, which is more price-sensitive, even for awards. True, summer awards to Europe have generally gone from 50K to 60K, but on the other hand, off-season at American went DOWN to 40K--and with the flexibility of taking one-way awards and combining them in interesting ways...it's actually a better situation. Also, there are some card-linked sales on flight...
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Re: United's Award Chart: Premium Award Cost Goes UP

DrFumblefinger ·
I think you'll find reward trips from the Western USA are harder to get for European travel than from the East coast. But if your schedule is flexible, you could be lucky.
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Re: United's Award Chart: Premium Award Cost Goes UP

JohnT ·
I think for premium travel,it makes sense. It has always surprised me that premium travel is so much cheaper from a frequent flier perspective (2:1) vs economy than when you actually buy the ticket. Just as a side note, aeroplan has recently reduced miles required on some of their reward charts as well.
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Re: United's Award Chart: Premium Award Cost Goes UP

PHeymont ·
John's point about the ratio between the two tiers is interesting (we looked at that a little in a forum post this week on value of miles). My guess--and it's just that--is that the same kind of yield-management used to set prices has taken a look at this and is carefully balancing loyalty vs. burn... I can't really compare East vs West availability personally; my school schedules have defined when I can travel well enough that I'm able to start hunting tickets 330 days out, when the...
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Re: Put Stuttgart on Your Travel List

GarryRF ·
Many European towns have a Central Square where concerts and displays by local groups entertain us. Is Stuttgart like this ? Does it have Art Galleries that survived the war years ? Stuttgart isn't one of the places you associate with tourists in Germany but you've given us a taster. Thanks Rob !
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo (#125)

HistoryDigger ·
Must be Germany. Old Albert had much to say about war. This reminds me of another stained glass window in the Grace Cathedral. The world was much in need of peace that year.
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Re: Banksy Opens up a Bemusement Park in England

PortMoresby ·
I think devoted Disney fans would welcome a lawsuit. Especially in the UK. Nothing like a good turf war. Think football. Think footpaths.
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Re: Passau: Small City, Big Past

George G. ·
Didn't know about the Three Rivers moniker. Coincidence that my father, born and raised in Pittsburgh, fought in many WWII campaigns, then when the war ended, he was stationed as a peacekeeper of the war aftermath in Passau.
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Re: Remembering: The British War Cemetery, Trincomalee

GarryRF ·
War Memorial Washington DC.
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Re: Finding Reiner #8: Trail's End?

DrFumblefinger ·
It would have been so very nice for you to have found Reiner as an elderly man slowly walking home with the aid of his cane from his daily dip in the mineral spring, and joined him for a revitalizing sip of schnaps and shared with him your journey. How cool would it have been for you to say, "Hi, Reiner. I'm your nephew's wife, Whitney". I think he'd be tickled to no end to know how much you've cared and how hard you've tried to find him.... Sadly, the absence of an ending like this should...
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Re: Finding Reiner #8: Trail's End?

GarryRF ·
I've travelled to Brisbane Australia looking for clues to my fathers war record. It was a hot summers day when I found Roe Street Barracks - still in use ! I was convinced it would have gone years ago to a development. I stood in the entrance and I felt a shiver run down my back. A feeling I've heard described as "someone walking on your grave"
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Re: Weymouth's tribute to the brave.

PHeymont ·
Together with the Finding Reiner series, this post helps remind us of the individuals and the effects on their communities. We've been seeing large and small memorials in France this past week. We were stunned, viewing the memorial in Saint-Remy-de-Provence, to note that there are over 100 names on the WWI memorial, many with similar, even identical names, contrasted with only a half-dozen or so from WWII, and then other numbers from other wars. The large losses in France in the First World...
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Re: Weymouth's tribute to the brave.

GarryRF ·
During WW1, before conscription was announced, young men were encouraged to join by local dignitaries and celebrities. Hundreds of Regiments of Infantry were formed with names such as the Liverpool Pals and the Bolton Pals - all made up of men from the same town. Many regiments were completely lost to combat in France. Small towns had lost all their young men to war and were left with no one coming home. Regiments after 1916 were drawn from several towns and cities.
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Re: HOW YOU CAN SAVE THE ASIAN ELEPHANT

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for sharing these thoughts. Elephants are highly intelligent animals, probably smarter than dogs for example. Wild elephants in Asia are having a hard time because of loss of habitat and conversion of their normal range to agricultural land. Most do not have ivory tusks so unlike their African cousins, they are not slaughtered for their teeth. In Sri Lanka I visited the elephant orphanage in Pinnawala a number of times, which I've previously written about on TravelGumbo at this link .
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Re: Charleston's Grand Mansions: Middleton Place

PHeymont ·
I was interested to note (aside from the alligators!) the fact that the house at Middleton was never restored after the Civil War. I noted that at Magnolia plantation, not far away, a small cottage was moved in to replace the original house...and it left me wondering. While the planter class certainly reclaimed power after Reconstruction, they must have taken quite a while to overcome the economic damage they brought on themselves.
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Re: Photography at the Edges, New York & San Francisco

DrFumblefinger ·
Among my greatest photography influences were Matthew Brady, whose grainy and gritty images of the Civil War made it so very "real" to future generations just learning about it in history books. And of course the great work of Ansel Adams. Far from gritty and grainy. Truly a visionary.
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Re: Doors of Charleston

GarryRF ·
The very last act of the American civil war - Captain Waddell of the CCS Shenandoah (built in the UK), walking up the steps of Liverpool Town Hall surrendering his vessel to the Lord Mayor, after sailing 'home' from Alaska to surrender. The shipping offices in Rumford Place Liverpool were the Embassy of the Confederate States during the American Civil War. The CCS Shenandoah was the only Confederate ship to circumnavigate the world.
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Re: UKs First National Civil War Centre to Open With Huge Civil War Re-Enactment

GarryRF ·
The English Civil War will be re-enacted in Newark, Nottinghamshire England. More details of the event and photos of the Castle are in: http://www.britainexpress.com/...ns.htm?attraction=93
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Re: United, Air China sign up new codeshares

Travel Rob ·
Good to hear. I just took an Air China flight and the airline has some good points for the longf distance budget traveler, like free meals and free video options.
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Re: Would you believe: Beach tours to N. Korea!

Travel Rob ·
I would like to see how life is in North Korea although it looks the minders have a tight grip on what you can see.From the documentaries, it seems similar to cold war era Romania. One of the most interesting documentaries I've seen is "Crossing the Line" about a American defector to North Korea. After the Korean War ,six American soldiers defected . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Joseph_Dresnok https://search.yahoo.com/yhs/s...la&hsimp=yhs-001
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Re: Art, Architecture, History and More in Fun Frederick, MD

George G. ·
One of our sister agencies called the Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center was located in Fort Detrick in Frederick Maryland. I visited AFMIC a number of times and your photos of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine brought back memories. I have not toured Frederick village itself, but your story has prompted me to put it on my list of places to visit.
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Re: July 17, 2019: A Stop at the Chocolate Museum, Cologne

GarryRF ·
Cologne Cathedral certainly is beautiful and worth the time to explore. Does it still have the war damage to the exterior stonework ?
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Re: July 17, 2019: A Stop at the Chocolate Museum, Cologne

George G. ·
Lindt is our absolute favorite chocolate in this house ! Cologne is the first place I ever touched down in a chartered US Army plane back in the Cold War days because Frankfurt was fogged in. Not sure how Koln got altered in English to a Cologne naming. Also went there years later to their wonderful zoo and a cold bottle of the local Kolsch beer.
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Re: Touring Maryland's Scenic Eastern Shore

GarryRF ·
Good to see Robert Morris gets a mention in your blog. He financed the War of Independence with his fortune. Signed the Declaration of Independence. And formed the Bank of America. He did well for a Local - born a mile from my own Birthplace - here in Liverpool UK
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Re: Midland Provincial Park, Alberta

GarryRF ·
My Grand Father worked in UK Coalmines around the 1900s . Stories he could tell were both amazing and scarey. Miners were exempt from War Service during WW1 as they supplied an "Essential Service". Women were employed at the Mines but never went below ground. Mules were used below ground - pulling bogeys - and never came back to the surface during their lives.
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Re: May 5, 2016: Liverpool Homes That Were "Saved" by World War II

PHeymont ·
Fascinating story and an odd sidelight of the war. I believe you had another "saved by the war" story a while ago here, a picturesque tavern whose demolition order lapsed because everyone was too busy with the war.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 24, 2015: Poppies -- Weeping Window at Woodhorn

DrFumblefinger ·
Most Americans aren't very familiar with the symbolism of the poppy to the Commonwealth countries. They are a sign of remembrance, and appreciation of loss of life for those who fought in the Great War(s). "In Flanders Field the poppies blow, between the crosses row on row,..." When I was young, Remembrance Day (similar to US Veteran's day) in Canada was always characterized by poppies. Everyone wore one, and I'm glad to say that tradition continues. I've never seen a more impressive display...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 24, 2015: Poppies -- Weeping Window at Woodhorn

TravelingCanuck ·
While the poppy is mainly used in the Commonwealth it is a symbol for all who have died in war. As Chris de Burgh sang in one of his songs "Up here in heaven, we stand together, Both the enemy and the friend, 'till the end of time"
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 24, 2015: Poppies -- Weeping Window at Woodhorn

PHeymont ·
Ah, remember my note about my childhood! Your 30 years are later, and after the Vietnam War had changed many people's view, not necessarily on the poppies or on remembrance, but on the American Legion and VFW, and their role during the Vietnam era.
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Re: A visit to Normandy: exploring the D-Day beaches

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for your comment, Arion. It's hard not to be moved by D-Day. The vastness of the assault, the staggering loss of life (civilian and military). What most impressed me is that the local people remember. Not French people away from the coast, but those whose relatives went through the assault make a point of teaching their children and grandchildren the price paid to liberate them from the Nazi fascists. The Juno Beach Center, built by the Canadian Beach, really did a great job of...
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Re: A visit to Normandy: exploring the D-Day beaches

GarryRF ·
Yes - my Dad and lots of other guys told me their stories! My Dad was in the Royal Navy and was taking landing craft full of soldiers from ship to shore - several times - under heavy fire! A guy I was doing work for had lots of photos and souvenirs on the walls of his house. Medals and maps. Newspaper cuttings and Badges. All in frames. I asked him how much he remembered of D-Day. "Every minute of every hour. Me and my mate had been together since the outbreak of war. Nearly 5 years. We were...
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Re: A visit to Normandy: exploring the D-Day beaches

GarryRF ·
When I was a little nipper and hadn't started school we would visit family at the weekend. No TV. No money. 1950's -you get the picture. So socialising with Dad's 9 brothers and sisters was as good as it got ! If you mentioned the War in some homes you'd be out the front door quicker than a Rat up a Drain pipe ! Others would tell you tales to make your hair curl. Tails of unbelievable bravery, absurdity and stupidity. The Ladies would tell the tale of how the American and Canadian GI's would...
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Re: A visit to Normandy: exploring the D-Day beaches

Former Member ·
Thank you mr fumblefinger for your poignant description and photos. Our family lost my uncle at Omaha Beach. He was one of those young men caught up in the drama of war who did his best in a very bad situation. Several times during the 1980s and early 1990s, I made my way to northwestern France to visit the D-Day landing sites. At that time, I was struck by three things - the immaculate grounds and air of respect, the gratefulness of the French people and the fact that there were very few...
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Re: Sometimes a Trip is just a Walk in the Park

PortMoresby ·
I don't disagree. Just pointing out the nature of human beings and, like world peace, we can wish for it while not actually expecting everyone to join in. But lessons are learned from war too and how would we feel about every tourist in town flocking to OUR park.
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? (11/20/13)

DrFumblefinger ·
A summary of Amazon from on the new Martin Cruz Smith Novel, TATIANA (see latest clues(. " Arkady Renko, one of the iconic inves­tigators of contemporary fiction, has survived the cultural journey from the Soviet Union to the New Russia..... The trail leads to Kaliningrad , a Cold War “secret city”......" TravelandNature, I believe we may have an answer!
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Re: Sun Studio, Memphis, Tennessee: The house Sam Phillips built

PHeymont ·
Actually, the importance of Memphis is long-standing and for good reason: it's on a flood-free bluff above the Mississippi. At different times in its history, both French and Spanish armies built forts there to control traffic on the Mississippi, and before the Civil War, it was the terminus of the only east-west railroad to cross the South...so it has always been a big transportation center. The railroad guaranteed its role in shipping cotton, and made it the center of the region.
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Re: "New AA" Details Dates for Alliance, Loyalty Change-overs

PortMoresby ·
Thanks for the update. It's already been useful. I have a few thousand USAir miles, not a lot but still enough to not let lapse. I've been making the occasional purchase of gifts through their site to keep them alive. After reading the article and the miles merge date I just bought my mother's gift through the AA site instead, the better to see them added to the bigger pile sooner. Thanks!
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Re: Finding Reiner #5: Behind the Veil of Time

PHeymont ·
I am just now catching up on reading, and I continue to be touched by not only your persistence and care in searching for Reiner, but also helping us search for meaning in so much that has been left behind in our understanding, because it doesn't fit under the grand tags that "simplify" history for posterity. This summer commemorates the start of World War I, important events of the end of World War II...and yet, so little of the individuals and their fates. Even the exhibits we saw this...
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
Amazing story indeed. I've heard many recollections from veterans of WW2 and all of them beyond belief. When I was a schoolboy (in England) my Math Teacher was in the real "Great Escape" in 1944 and told us boys stories to make your hair stand up ! But when he told us of the Germans making an "example" of repeat escapees his eyes were full of the horrors of war. Then we'd get back to the Math lesson. "Tomorrow we'll found out how we hid the guard dogs!"
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Re: Finding Reiner #6: Frozen Grave

GarryRF ·
As you've seen in the Great Escape, taking prisoners into the forest and killing them wasn't just a Russian idea. It was used against the Allied POWs by the SS. But there were many allied airmen shot down over Germany who returned home after the war with life saving surgery by the "enemy" Metal plates fitted to the skull where the bone had been shot away I remember. Shall I send an email to your website Whitney ?
 
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