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Tagged With "Thomas Gould"

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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

Travel Rob ·
Thanks ,it truly is a highlight of any trip to the area.I loved the Location and setting of the house.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PHeymont ·
Jefferson has always been a fascinating and difficult character, with many sides to his life and work. Aside from the Monticello and other designs, he was also a pioneer agriculturalist, importing many varieties of flowers and vegetables, and improving them by breeding. But for me, the hardest task, mentally and emotionally, is to reconcile the brilliant political and philosophical words with an absolute refusal to even question the institution of slavery, when many others of his time in...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I never try to judge historic figures through the prism of modern values. Remember in the 18th century slavery was a global institution -- absolutely every country in the world had slaves. And being from Virginia, he knew the southern states wouldn't join northern colonies in forming a new country without slavery being allowed, so I don't think he thought it was time to fight that fight. I think he valued the formation of the new country above all else -- risking his life to do so...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PHeymont ·
I would agree that presentism is a real danger for historians...but without wanting to veer this discussion too far off course, you'll note that I cited two of his close colleagues and acquaintances in Virginia alone, not to mention Lafayette and many others IN HIS TIME AND ACQUAINTANCE who had already concluded that it was time, and many others were acting on it. It was an active debate in his time and place, he was aware of it, and sadly...he took the wrong side.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
I agree his side was not the right one, PHeymont, but I also believe of greatest importance for him was forming the new country. I don't think we'll ever know his personal feelings about slavery because he didn't write about them.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PortMoresby ·
I believe you can tell a great deal about someone from what they leave behind. On a visit to Monticello I was struck by the design of the house and the distinct sensibility it indicated regarding the creative mind of it's designer. I bought a sundial in the gift shop and am reminded of the man every time I look at it.
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

PortMoresby ·
Regarding his feeling about slavery, I have no doubt, because of the nature of the man as shown by the things he did write, he was conflicted. And while he seems never to have come to a personal solution I don't believe, either, that his lack of action was de facto support for the institution. Sometimes there just isn't time to resolve one's own conflicts and be a father of a new nation too. We may be asking too much of human beings if we expect tidy packages and complete resolutions in 1 ...
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Re: A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

Hank ·
I visited Monticello as a kid and enjoyed the views. I need to go back now and look at the architecture here and especially at the U of V in more detail. My favorite John Kennedy quote (to his staff at a dinner in the White HOuse) I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered at the White House - with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone. Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quo...#G4wQ5S4SazWSs0dq.99
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Re: Wadsworth Atheneum - Hartford CT

HistoryDigger ·
I loved going when I was a college student. Recently I discovered that these Wadsworths are in my family tree. So glad my ancestors appreciated beautiful art.
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Re: Wadsworth Atheneum - Hartford CT

PHeymont ·
Nice! We've also enjoyed the Wadsworth...which makes a nice break in a trip between NY and Boston, as well. It's also hosted some interesting temporary exhibits that have made it worth a trip of its own.
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Re: June 23, 2016: Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.

DrFumblefinger ·
I like this memorial, especially at night time, when the bronze figure of Jefferson really stands out against the light colored dome. Thanks, Ottoman!
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

Travel Rob ·
A great piece! Amazing to me how some of the best products of their day were not built commercially . Even when they were, sometimes they were not successful. Cars like the GE-100 are great examples of that. A true find and thanks for teaching us more!
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

DrFumblefinger ·
Love it! Exactly the type of finding that makes a trip memorable. Something proponents of electric cars seem to forget or choose to ignore -- where does the electricity come from? Currently mostly from coal and oil fired plants, so the practical side of having them for most doesn't currently make that much sense (might as well burn the oil product in the car engine, right). But I am hopeful that was energy technology improves, as it surely will, we'll develop better ways of charging these...
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

PHeymont ·
The argument, and I'm not informed enough to judge it, is that the amount of fossil fuel needed to generate electricity for a plug-in is far less than that required to run a gasoline engine. The same sort of argument that points out that a gallon of fuel moves far more freight on a diesel train than a diesel truck. On the other hand, that's about plug-in cars. For hybrids, it's a different story because the batteries charge while the car is running on gas. So less gas is used than using gas...
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

DrFumblefinger ·
As I understand it, with hybrids the batteries charge when the car brakes are applied (transferring the energy of moving to the battery), so they're especially well adapted to city driving in places with lots of stop signs and traffic lights. Less useful for driving on open road because you don't brake often. So living in Brooklyn, I think the hybrid would be a reasonable choice for you. I don't think battery technology is anywhere near "ripe" yet, but as with the Mercury and Gemini...
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

PHeymont ·
Much further to go, of course, but even in a highway driving situation (and a city/highway mix), hybrids are generally cheaper to run than their gas-only counterparts. That's Camry vs Camry hybrid, for example, not Corolla vs Prius.
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

PHeymont ·
A little further research confirms what I thought: at least in the Toyota and Ford hybrids, the gasoline engine powers a generator/charger while in use. That's in addition to the power captured from braking.
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Re: Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

DrFumblefinger ·
I have some friends with a Prius, and their greatest fuel efficiency comes when driving in the city, not on the highway. Paradoxical, but it shows how good the braking is at building up a charge. Good to know there is a backup generator. While the hybrids save on fuel, they also cost thousands of dollars more than their non hybrid counterparts. For an average consumer, it takes many years to recapture that extra cost for the hybrid on fuel savings, if they ever will. And there's the issue of...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 9, 2014: Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Pennington County, South Dakota

Ottoman ·
Hi Travel Luver I apologize for the lateness of this response. In answer to your question, I unfortunately did not see the monument lit up at night...my travel schedule didn't permit it. I too hope to go back to Mount Rushmore in the near future, primarily to see it lit up, for I have heard it is quite special, and the photos I have seen confirm that. When you make it back to Mount Rushmore, I hope you will share your adventures with us. Thanks for your feedback. I appreciate it. Take care,...
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 9, 2014: Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Pennington County, South Dakota

Travel Luver ·
Amazing place! I saw it once as a boy but see I need to get back and study it more. Did you see it lite up at night? I seem to recall that's quite special.
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Thomas Cook celebrates 150 years on the road

PHeymont ·
Thomas Cook and Sons, widely regarded as the world's first real travel agency, opened its doors just 150 years ago, in Fleet Street, London. Cook himself was a 20-year veteran of leading groups on tours.   The Telegraph (UK) has an...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, March 12, 2015: King Kamehameha Statue, Kapaau, Hawaii Island, Hawaii

Ottoman ·
King Kamehameha I (1758 - 1819) conquered the Hawaiian Islands and united them to formally establish the Kingdom of Hawai ʻ i in 1810, thus founding the Kamehameha Dynasty. By developing alliances with the major Pacific colonial powers, Kamehameha...
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Wadsworth Atheneum - Hartford CT

Jonathan L ·
Main Building of the Wadsworth Atheneum - opened 1844   When I travel, I love finding small art museum with good collections. The Wadsworth Atheneum is one of my favorite finds. Opened in 1842, the Atheneum is the oldest public art museum in the...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, October 9, 2014: Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Pennington County, South Dakota

Ottoman ·
  The Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore in Pennington County (near Keystone), South Dakota, in the United States.  Sculpted by Danish-American Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln...
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Canterbury Cathedral: A Pilgrims' Goal

PHeymont ·
One of England's oldest and most important religious buildings, the Cathedral was the goal of the pilgrms in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
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June 23, 2016: Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.

Ottoman ·
If you ever visit Washington, D.C., make sure to visit this beautiful memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson, a complex 18th century man with a wide ranging impact on the very makeup of America itself.
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Feb. 23, 2017: Statues of the Presidents, Grand Forks, ND

Ottoman ·
Discovering these presidential statues made an ordinary trip to a shopping center extraordinary.
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A visit to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

DrFumblefinger ·
  Thomas Jefferson was the third President of the United States.  His brilliance and great writing skills are well known.  He authored one of the greatest statements of liberty in human history, the Declaration of...
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British tour companies cancel Tunisia vacations

PHeymont ·
Britain's biggest tour operators have cancelled all summer travel to Tunisia, following government advice. Travelers will get refunds or alternate destinations.
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Museum find: GE's 'missing' electric car

PHeymont ·
Long forgotten except in Schenectady's science museum, the little GE electric car that could, long before Prius and Tesla. Here's its story.
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Branch Museum of Architecture & Design, Richmond, Virginia

George G. ·
George G takes us on a tour of a Virginia museum whose building is well-suited to its field.
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Gould Cabin, Fairbanks

DrFumblefinger ·
The Gould Cabin is one of the oldest in the Fairbanks region, standing on the spot it was built on more than a century ago.
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