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Tagged With "desert bighorn sheep"

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Re: May 10, 2020: Mojave Desert in Winter

Professorabe ·
Superb shot and excellent image quality. SLR?
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Re: May 10, 2020: Mojave Desert in Winter

DrFumblefinger ·
Yes, Professor, an SLR. My old Canon AE-1
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Re: Sept. 23, 2016: Feeling Sheepish

GarryRF ·
Farmers in Scotland have taken to spray painting their sheep in an effort to stop sheep rustling. The first effect has been bus loads of Japanese tourists wanting to stop and take photos. What next ? They'll soon be selling orange sweaters to tourists..
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Re: Art and Survival in the Tassili Plateau

Professorabe ·
Beautifully written - an absolute joy to read. Thanks!
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Re: Art and Survival in the Tassili Plateau

George G. ·
Excellent ! Like a fascinating novel I had to keep reading, then looking back and reading it again.
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Re: Art and Survival in the Tassili Plateau

Amateuremigrant ·
Really glad it's gone down well with you George; I only do factual stuff though, I haven't got the deviousness of a good novelist 🤣
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Re: Chinese Celebrate Year of The Horse

Former Member ·
The year of the horse is not my year mine is the year of the sheep, i'm a '91 liner still so young hehe
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Re: Arches National Park — One of America’s Finest

Travel Luver ·
I need to get to this Park. It is simply amazing! Besides Arches, what else can one do around the Moab area?
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Re: Arches National Park — One of America’s Finest

DrFumblefinger ·
There's a ton of stuff to do around Moab, Travel Luver. There's also scenic Canyonlands National Park nearby, well worth exploring. Off-road biking (bicycle, not motorcycle) is extremely popular. Hiking in the cooler seasons. Whitewater rafting is excellent in the summer. And you're less than a day's drive from your next Utah destination, such as Bryce, Zion, or Monument Valley. One of my favorite spots in the US!
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Re: Where Gumbo was #22. Skull Rock, Joshua Tree National Park, California

PHeymont ·
Lesson learned! I should have Googled Skull Rock instead of speculating about animated films!
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Re: A Springtime Walk in the Desert

PHeymont ·
Great color and variety! Thanks...I'm going to have to get to the desert in spring, sometime. I visited the Sonora desert in December, and recognize some of these from seeing them without their brilliant display (click HERE for that blog) This is certainly a reminder of how little we know a place when we only know it "in season."
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Re: A Springtime Walk in the Desert

GarryRF ·
How many times do folks say "Why did you go there ? There's nothing to see !" That's why I love going the opposite way from the crowd. Beautiful selection of photo's ! Any little beasties on the loose ?
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Re: A Springtime Walk in the Desert

DrFumblefinger ·
There were a lot of these little lizards around, GarryRF. Generally a good sign because if there's rattlesnakes about they hide. Except for birds, everything else was well hidden.
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Re: July 27, 2016: Bighorn Sheep at Hemenway Park in Boulder City, NV

DrFumblefinger ·
Wow! That's a lot of sheep! I imagine there are few places that offer such succulent moist grass for these desert dwellers. Must have been fun to stop and study them. And good that you didn't let those little dogs out of the car, as the sheep likely would have killed them.
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Re: Wolves or Cheese: France must decide

PHeymont ·
Actually, the farmers have asked to be allowed to pen the sheep in close to keep them safe...but under the current rules, their milk can then not be used for Roquefort. It seems there should be some compromise possible here...
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Re: Wolves or Cheese: France must decide

DrFumblefinger ·
I love wolves. They are beautiful, but they are also smart and efficient predators. An easy food source like sheep is something they'll go back to again and again once tried, especially if they develop a taste for mutton. Much easier than bringing down a deer, for example, or chasing rabbits. Cattle ranchers in the north central US plains and Canada face a similar problem, where wolves can develop a taste for calves. And that is much more costly to ranchers than the loss of a sheep.
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Re: Route 66 - Pasadena to Needles

IslandMan ·
Thanks for the journey, JL. This one has been on my wish list for some time. I do intend to make it one day. Also love the Bagdad Cafe. I remember the movie, it was one of those cult classics that, like you said, went almost unnoticed. Good to know the buildings are still there.
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Re: Route 66 - Pasadena to Needles

PHeymont ·
I've only had the pleasure of a small part of the road (east of Flagstaff and yes, passing that corner in Winslow, Arizona, but Route 66 is pretty much the symbol of the feeling so many of us have, of wanting to discover a past still visible in the present, and worth holding onto. Another good book for "shunpikers" is George Cantor's "Where the Old Roads Go: Driving the First Federal Highways of the Northeast." It's an easy and rewarding read even if you're not setting out on Rte 6, Rte 20,...
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Re: Route 66 - Pasadena to Needles

NonstopFromJFK ·
The bottle tree ranch is so awesome! I love the whimsical western town charm - I hope I'll get to do a road trip like that one day.
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Re: Route 66 - Pasadena to Needles

PortMoresby ·
I n the mid-90s the National Park Service sent a team of professionals to do a survey of surviving road and features of the entire route, Chicago to the Santa Monica Pier, with my husband as illustrator for the report. I don't know if it's generally available but it might be interesting reading for someone with more than a casual interest.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, November 25, 2014: Fall colors at Upper Kananaskis Lake, Alberta

GarryRF ·
My Wife - she who must be obeyed - loves a single Kayak and the open sea. So I presume this would be on a lake. Much safer I think. Sounds like you have the perfect location for a wilderness family like ours ! When we camp in summer you'd mistake some of the tents for aircraft hangers. But the kids and babies come too. Canoes and Fishing rods. Wet suits and waders. We go to Shell Island in Wales - but only when the tides out. Need to plan your journey ahead. They only have Grizzly Sheep.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, February 10, 2015: Arizona – The sunshine, the red rock desert and the survival of the fittest

GarryRF ·
We always think of lifeless deserts but when you get in there its amazing what you find. Some wonderful cactus pictures too. I enjoy getting close to those layers of rock. The colours and the shells. A million years of history. And no one saying "Don't touch"
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Re: Colorado National Monument

rbciao ·
Thanks for the beautiful pics. One of these summers I'm going to start touring the U. S. of A.
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Re: Colorado National Monument

DrFumblefinger ·
Excellent idea, rbciao! Although I'd recommend visiting the desert regions of the southwest in the shoulder seasons, rather than during the heat of summer. No question in my mind that some of the best scenery in the world is in North America. Ciao!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, February 12, 2015: Desert Bighorn Sheep, Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada

IslandMan ·
This must have been a rare treat, Ottoman. It's always interesting to see wildlife in their natural habitat
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, February 12, 2015: Desert Bighorn Sheep, Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada

Ottoman ·
Hi IslandMan You are so right. I could've sat there and watched these two lovely animals all day, but unfortunately the amount of daylight we had was rapidly dwindling. Oh well, there's more traveling to be done and more "Wow!" moments to capture. Thanks for the feedback. Take care and best wishes to you.
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Re: The Cabins, Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada (Where Gumbo Was #107)

Travel Luver ·
That night shot is great! Thanks!
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Re: Whoa! Not so fast on that shrinking baggage size!

DrFumblefinger ·
That's good news! But rather than saying airline consumers were a lion, I think I'd have used "the sheep have bleated -- loudly"
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, May 28, 2015: Logan Pass, Glacier National Park, Montana

TravelingCanuck ·
Awesome pictures. I was in Waterton Park in the early 80s with work in early May before the season opened. The town site had dozens of mountain sheep everywhere. It was so beautiful and peaceful. We were about the only people other then residents there. Must certainly do another trip down that way and go across into Glacier Park as well. Thanks.
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Re: Death Valley National Park

Marilyn Jones ·
travelgumbo hit another home run today. This is a fantastic post!! Awesome photos and interesting narrative. Well done!
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Re: Death Valley National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
That's about as thorough a write up of Death Valley as I've ever seen. It is a very desolate place and the temperature extremes are amazing. In one late winter day we went from snow to 115 F. The heat, especially in the summer, is dangerous. Don't visit in the summer. Visit it in the winter. The scenery is beautiful and it's definitely worth seeing.
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Re: Death Valley National Park

Mytraveledroad ·
Good read with nice pictures. www.adventuresofdejav.com
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Re: Death Valley National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
I came across this piece on Death Valley which, while not as interesting as Tom's blog, has some interesting facts. You can read it at this link !
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Re: Life in the Sonora Desert

Travel Luver ·
Full of life, but those spines look pretty hostile to me!
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Re: Life in the Sonora Desert

Travel Rob ·
For sure you have to watch where you walk, because if you brush up against a cactus, it seems to latch on to you.
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Re: Swaledale Sheep, Black Hill, Muker, Swaledale, North Yorkshire.

PHeymont ·
I'm curious about the colored spots on the sheep...are they to identify the owner?
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Re: Swaledale Sheep, Black Hill, Muker, Swaledale, North Yorkshire.

GarryRF ·
The spray is used to identify which sheep are pregnant, dipped or vaccinated.
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Re: Swaledale Sheep, Black Hill, Muker, Swaledale, North Yorkshire.

GarryRF ·
Maybe choose your sheep, the colour and collect your new suit Monday ?
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

PHeymont ·
A lot of questions! Let me try a few answers... Absolutely I'd say stop in Iceland. Every place in the world is unique, but Iceland is more so, geographically, in climate, and in history. Half a week (or even a week) won't do more than scratch the surface, but you'll be able to visit incredible waterfalls, climb on glaciers, see evidence of recent volcanic activity, and realize that under it all is a huge pool of thermally heated water that provides over 70% of the nation's energy. If that...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

Travel Luver ·
Never been anywhere in Nevada except Vegas. Didn't know they had beautiful places like this. Can you get there from Vegas as a day trip? Was it hot?
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Well, for a start, make sure you visit Reno, Travel Luver. It's a much small town than Vegas but still has all the casinos, restaurants, etc that you'd expect from a Nevada City. From here it's easy to do a day trip to Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, or down to Carson City. Reno is actually the closest major city to Great Basin National Park, say about a 3-4 hour drive. Vegas is 6-7 hour drive away. Salt Lake City is closer to Great Basin than Vegas. But you really can't do it as...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PortMoresby ·
A friend who was a park planner for the National Park Service said his favorite park was Big Bend in Texas. He's a lover of desert landscapes, wide-open spaces and, in the case of this park too, almost no visitors. Another orphan, no doubt. http://www.nps.gov/bibe/index.htm
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the note, PortMoresby. I've visited a lot of the US parks, but Big Bend is still on my "to do" list. They do white water rafting trips there, which appeals to me. One of the things that a lot of folks enjoy about these "orphans" is that they are so sparsely peopled, with few tourists. I think the US Parks system is the USA's biggest tourist asset. I'm certainly a huge fan. Seems whenever I'm in a US Park, more German is spoken than English. The German folks certainly are aware of...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PHeymont ·
The comments on "orphan parks" made for some interesting thoughts. How do we (as a society) choose what to save for parks? When you consider urban parkland, the point is obvious: people who have no land of their own need areas for public recreation. In other cases, individuals with wealth and influence have created parks in areas important to them personally (think of Acadia and the Rockefellers, Palisades Interstate Park and Morgan partners). But setting aside and maintaining areas like...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PortMoresby ·
Pheymont, you speak as if budget cuts are in the future when in fact the Park Service has been functioning with less and less for years now. The Service has a mission to which they're dedicated but less funding has meant "deferred" maintenance on buildings, trails, you name it. And when features of a park are deemed unsafe or there isn't personnel to oversee visitors then parts are closed. I've experienced that myself recently when a trail I've visited in years past was closed. I have no...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
Costs for the existing parks is mostly maintenance and salary. In the face of a broke federal government, I would favor increased user fees. $10-20 for a family to visit a national park for a week is the greatest bargain out there. People who love the parks would happily pay twice as much and I don't think the extra cost would be a deterent. Also, it's reasonable for those with concessions to pay up more than they are. They are given a monopoly and some of those profits should go back to the...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

PHeymont ·
No, I'm painfully aware of the past and present cuts...but I see more ahead. My concern is that there are loud voices (my own included) to speak out against cuts to parks that have a big "fan base," including Gateway here in the NY area. Because so many speak out for those parks, I fear that NPS will increasingly "hide the damage" by even more drastic cuts to others--perhaps even outright abandonment. And that's not so far-fetched an idea. For some 20 or more years here in New York, Prospect...
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Re: A visit to Great Basin National Park

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont, I don't believe we disagree. I think the problem is that the park system relies on "federal handouts" and when a government is broke, there's less to hand out. As I said, I sort of favor them being self-funded by their user and concession fees. That's a lot of money already (if it was all kept in the parks) and people would be willing to pay more IF they knew the money stayed in the parks and didn't get diverted back into the Washington's general budget. Orphan parks would be...
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Re: A Visit to the “Spine Garden:”Cactus in Arizona’s Sonora Desert

DrFumblefinger ·
As it snows and storms outside, a welcome diversion! I find all cacti interesting but there's something captivating about the saguaro forest around Tucson. While visiting Saguaro National Park (years ago, before it was a national park), I remember a newspaper clipping tacked onto the park's information board. The headline read something like "Saguaro cactus involved in double homocide". Seems a drunk yahoo with a shotgun drove out to the desert to kill himself a giant saguaro. He did, the...
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Re: A Visit to the “Spine Garden:”Cactus in Arizona’s Sonora Desert

GarryRF ·
I love to travel in the winter to hot countries - who doesn't ? But apart from the obvious reasons you get access to rare and strange fruit that just doesn't travel well. Star fruit, Custard apples, Salak and Prickly pears ! PRICKLY PEARS Delicious !!
 
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