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Tagged With "buying miles"

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Re: Red Brick and Sandstone: Look of the North

GarryRF ·
If you had travelled a mile north you would have seen the biggest brick built building in the world. Liverpool Tobacco Warehouse, The 14 storey building spans across 36 acres - and its construction used 27 million bricks, 30,000 panes of glass and 8,000 tons of steel
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Re: Where in the World is Gumbo? 7.5

WorkerBee ·
Originally Posted by PortMoresby: It seems to be "Leopold", a symbolic 1890's photographer, by David Clemons, Higgins Point, Lake Coeur d'Alene in northern Idaho. Well done Port Moresby. However there is a minor point about the location. Higgens Point (yes, this is the correct spelling) is about 0.2 mile southeast of the location of the statue. The statue is actually located on the 34 acre Coeur d'Alene Parkway, a thin strip of park land running along the Centennial Trail for about 1/2 mile...
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Re: Minneapolis in the winter

Ottoman ·
Hi Theodore! I am a Mall of America fan. You can easily spend an entire weekend (or many evenings) at the Mall of America. First of all, the mall is very easy to get to by train from downtown (CICAK did a wonderful job explaining that), and fares are quite cheap (fares go for about $1.75 to $2.25 one way depending on what time of day you ride). As CICAK also mentioned, there is something for everybody at the mall. If you just want to find a warm dry place to walk and people watch, I believe...
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Re: Best Outdoor Workout Spots?

DrFumblefinger ·
I love walking in the mountains! Almost anywhere will do, but the Canadian Rockies in the summer are my favorite place. A 10-15 mile hike is a good workout and lets you enjoy some spectacular scenery, including lots of flora and fauna.
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Re: United's Award Chart: Premium Award Cost Goes UP

DrFumblefinger ·
I've seen a lot of "award creep" in my days, and I think there's more to come. A "mile" is worth less and less all the time. It's clear that airline miles aren't worth banking for any period of time. Use them when it's logical to do so. They likely will be worth less in the near future. Thanks for the link, PHeymont.
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Re: Up, Up and Away: Airline miles cards with big bonuses

rbciao ·
I have a Delta American Express Platinum card that has served us well. The fee is higher than the gold card, but we can check two bags free, priority boarding, and a free companion pass yearly. We fly two or three times a year and the value of the waived baggage fee and the companion pass far exceed the $150 annual fee. The card also accrues one mile for each dollar spent and lately has offered cash back incentives. For example: spend $15 at Panera's using the card and receive $5 credit on...
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Re: AAA Premier a Good Idea for Budget Travelers

Former Member ·
AAA seems to choose their contracted towing services very well. I have always had good luck with them. I used the coverage when I had a break down with a rental car in a small town. The rental car company suggested that I call AAA for towing to their office in a nearby larger town to exchange the car. The rental car company had a contract with the same towing company that was under contract to AAA in that area. So that was very easy. If the tow goes over the 200 miles, they charge something...
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Re: AAA Premier a Good Idea for Budget Travelers

Travel Rob ·
One note on why the other AAA coverages just doesn't compare to the Premier Membership.The Classic Membership only allows towing of 5 miles.The Plus allows the 100 mile, but if you use just one 200 mile tow,you will see the value.
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Re: Where in the World is TravelGumbo #297

George G. ·
Here's the last set of clues! Send your answer to TGSuggestions@gmail.com This first house was built for a wealthy commission merchant, that was modified many times. A neoclassical revival front porch with ionic columns and a circular pavilion was added to the main Italianate structure. Also, a carriage house was added made from bricks of the demolished house next door (mentioned in Friday’s clue). It is now listed as a Victorian Mansion on a list of historic registered places and landmarks.
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Re: Welcome to The Golden State.

PortMoresby ·
Currently estimated at 32,00 acres in size, the Butte Fire is now burning 1 mile from Mokelumne Hill. While I have no doubt the tiny town will be saved, your best view of it at the moment may be here , on TravelGumbo. More details on the CalFire site.
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Re: A stroll through the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens, Vail

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for the comments, Garry. Yes, winter arrives early because of the very high altitude. Over a mile and a half above sea level. Summers are very nice -- warm (75-80F) dry pleasant days (no humidity to speak off), and it always cools down nicely at night, so most places don't even have air conditioning. It really was that empty. No more than 6 folks in the garden including my wife and I, and of course not counting the hundreds of birds flying about.
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Re: New Eurostar Service, London - Provence

GarryRF ·
Sorry Paul but you've lost me ! If you fly to Marseilles and take the 760 mile train journey to London you'll avoid the APD. True. But that will cost you more than the APD and you'll waste a day. You dont see much from the window on a train doing 186 MPH. Be aware that the nation with the most heavily taxed European passengers is France, where over 60% of airport and passenger charges are in the form of state taxes to be paid by the passenger.
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Re: GPS: 'Your destination will be...very wet.'

DrFumblefinger ·
On our recent trip to Sicily, our GPS took us down a farm road that dead-ended, except for a rugged dirt tract that was unsafe to drive in a car (doable in a 4 wheel drive vehicle). The GPS instructed me to continue down the dirt track, but as a human being I declined the machine's advice. Good thing I did, because as we looped back we could see that even the dirt track dead-ended in a mile or so. Somehow we made it to our next destination, although it's easy and expected to get lost a...
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Re: Florida warned: take action against future flooding

GarryRF ·
50 years ago this area of Liverpool UK was underwater twice a day. Every tide. And storms would cause the land to flood half a mile inland. So this area is now a man made construction. Sand hills cover the solid foundation. Marrem grass has roots that bind the sand together. And it works. Copied off the Netherlands where much of the land is below sea level all year.
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Re: Airlines defend holding onto fuel surcharges

GarryRF ·
Yes Paul. We've been paying for the 3 mile tunnel under the River Mersey for 50 years. It was supposed to be free 2 years ago - fully paid for. We're still paying now - with an increase to subsidise better public transport. Again - I smell a rat in the kitchen. A greedy one as well
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Re: On your marks, get set, get on board!

GarryRF ·
Sometimes getting to your gate involves walking half a mile. Walkways - when they are working - are a necessity to our ageing parents and less mobile neighbours. I just hope distances in this airport are not extreme.
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Re: Touring Maryland's Scenic Eastern Shore

GarryRF ·
Good to see Robert Morris gets a mention in your blog. He financed the War of Independence with his fortune. Signed the Declaration of Independence. And formed the Bank of America. He did well for a Local - born a mile from my own Birthplace - here in Liverpool UK
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Re: Walking the Burgundy Canal

PortMoresby ·
Every walk is different, of course, so planning, for someone like me who isn't a distance walker, is essential. I can walk comfortably up to about 10 miles with my little pack, more if I must but try to avoid it, so there's no rush in the morning to be out early. I enjoy a leisurely breakfast and head out mid-morning. I'm never in the position of looking for a place to overnight because I've reserved in advance, either well in advance or at least a day or 2, knowing where I'll be. In France...
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Re: Classic American Cars #4

GarryRF ·
The owner will take you for a 20 mile ride for $20 ! Just get to Holguin, Cuba ......
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 3) cars from the USA and UK

rbciao ·
Great pics of great cars. I will put the Tampa Bay Museum on my list of things to see. Additionally, The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky is awesome, as well. It includes a 50's diner cafe featuring period stuff for lunch. Less than a mile away is the Corvette assembly plant, which offers tours. This is the only place in the whole wide world where Corvettes are assembled. Both are definitely worth a visit. The National Packard Museum is located In Warren, Oh and is small, but...
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Re: Tampa Bay Automobile Museum: 3) cars from the USA and UK

rbciao ·
The National Corvette Museum and the nearby GM assembly plant are located in Bowling Green, Ky. and both venues are really worth a visit. The museum is just off of I-65 at exit 28, so it is easy to find. Plus, there are signs on the interstate in both directions making it well marked. We saw the signs when we were southbound on our way to Louisiana and decided to stop on our way home. We figured an hour in each location and we spent over two hours in each. We could have spent many, many...
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Re: The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

DrFumblefinger ·
I drove across the Skyway Bridge for the first time about a year ago. It was a dark and foggy night (sounds like something Snoopy would type out, doesn't it), and the bridge seemed to go on forever. But it is well constructed and on the upslope makes it seem as if you're riding to the stars. Scariest bridge I ever was on was on across the Alligator River in North Carolina. The bridge was between a half mile and mile long, very low lying (might even be a floating bridge), but the fog was so...
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Re: Gallery: Signs of Quebec

DrFumblefinger ·
They were all taken in the historic area of Quebec City, Garry, which is not that large an area. Probably geographically in a square mile area or less.
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Re: Walking in England

GarryRF ·
England is covered with thousands of miles of man made Canals. They were the Highways of the Industrial Revolution. Carrying Cotton, Coal, Timber all over the country. The boats they used were pulled by horses which walked along the tow path. Every mile or two you'll find a pub to stop and relax. Maybe a meal too. I love walking by the canals. Back to nature and peaceful. LEEDS TO LIVERPOOL CANAL. This is Haskayne. 8 miles north of Liverpool.
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More Frequent Flier changes in the air

PHeymont ·
The world of award travel and elite perks continues to shake and shift.   Delta, which like United, has switched for next year to awarding flight miles based not on distance but on price paid for ticket—a move that hurts many frequent...
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Devils Tower National Monument

Ottoman ·
    Devils Tower is an igneous intrusion or laccolith in the Bear Lodge Mountains (part of the Black Hills) in northeastern Wyoming, above the Belle Fourche River. It rises dramatically 1,267 feet (386 m) above the surrounding terrain and...
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The Sunshine Skyway Bridge – The Creepy and the Miraculous

GutterPup ·
  If you follow Interstate 275 south through the city of St. Petersburg, Florida until you run out of land, you’ll be greeted by a gentle slope of road that seemingly rises from the waters of the Tampa Bay. This...
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Saguenay Fjord — Deep and Long but not very Tall

DrFumblefinger ·
I’d heard as a schoolboy that the Saguenay Fjord was one of the longest in the world.  Years later someone told me the area around Tadoussac was pretty, sparsely developed and inviting.  Given a spare day or...
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The Valley Island of Maui: 3) Central, Upcountry and South Maui

DrFumblefinger ·
 The largest stretch of (relatively) flat land on Maui is the valley between the two volcanoes, Haleakala and the West Maui Mountains.  This area is commonly called “Central Maui” and it’s here most locals live....
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A visit to Normandy: exploring the D-Day beaches

DrFumblefinger ·
True to its history, our visit to the coast of Normandy was cool, windy and wet -- but that's how it's been for thousands of years.  Many an armada was delayed in leaving or landing on these shores because of inclement weather, including the...
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Liverpool - What do you mean. It has a Beach ?

GarryRF ·
When I tell folks I meet on Vacation I'm from Liverpool UK they say "You must be enjoying all this beach life.  Long walks on the Sand.  Fishing.  Fresh air and gorgeous sunsets" so I reply "No. I get all this back in Liverpool- I'm...
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Walla, Walla: “So nice they named it twice!”

DrFumblefinger ·
What’s a Walla Walla?  It’s a Indian name meaning “many waters”.  It’s also the name of a charming city in southeastern Washington; nestled close to the Columbia and Snake River valleys, and with a river of its...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Feb 21, 2014: Hadrian's Wall, England

Mac ·
1,450 miles from Rome was the limit of the mighty Roman Empire in 122 AD when the Roman Emperor Hadrian came to Britain and took the decision to build this massive stone wall in order to consolidate his rule and the geographical extent of his Empire....
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A springtime hike on the Yakima Rim Skyline Trail

DrFumblefinger ·
After a rather long winter I was ready for a pleasant dayhike.  While I’d rather head up to the mountains for a stroll in an alpine meadow, there’s way too much snow up there in April.  Fortunately in the Northwest there are some...
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Washington State’s Long Beach Peninsula

DrFumblefinger ·
 For most travelers, the southwestern corner of Washington state is easy to bypass.  It lies well over an hour’s drive from the busy I-5 Interstate Freeway.  The broad mouth of the Columbia River limits access from the Oregon...
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Chicago — City of Skyscrapers & Cloud Gate

DrFumblefinger ·
Like the monolith in Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke’s monumental film, 2001: A Space Odyssey, “Cloud Gate” looks like an alien object dropped onto a terrestrial landscape (not the African Savannah, but rather into...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 9) Horton Plains

DrFumblefinger ·
My first introduction to Horton Plains National Park was in Hans Mohemius’ photo room at his home in Colombo.  Hans was a skilled amateur photographer who shared with me a magical photo of a sunrise...
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Sri Lanka: A Land Like No Other (Part 8) Hill Country

DrFumblefinger ·
   The coastal regions of Sri Lanka are fairly flat.  Given that and the relatively small size of the island, I was surprised to find impressive peaks (over 2500 m high) at its center.  These mountains, lush and...
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Washington Oaks Garden: a Peaceful Paradise in Florida

Travel Rob ·
With all that Florida has to offer, you'd think it would be hard for anybody to pick a favorite place in the state. In my case though, it's not. By a mile,my favorite place is Washington Oaks Gardens State Park. Washington Oaks is one of the most...
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El Yunque: A visit to the rain forest

PHeymont ·
When we began planning a trip to Puerto Rico, and planning to include our 14-year-old granddaughter, we sent her some of the material we were gathering and asked her what her priorities were. She, and we, both had El Yunque right near the top of the...
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Visiting Western Greenland. Part I – Three Towns

Racing_snake ·
In July 2006 I gave in to curiosity and realized my ambition to visit West Greenland.  I returned 6 times in the next 8 years!  I knew that about 10% of the world’s freshwater was sitting on Greenland with the capacity to raise...
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Visiting Western Greenland. Part II – Western Greenland on Foot!

Racing_snake ·
Part I covered three Greenlandic towns I have visited but my real passion is being out in West Greenland’s wilderness.  So this part is about what it has to offer those willing to get out there on foot and under canvas!    I...
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Thinking Cuba? Tickets not so easy yet!

PHeymont ·
Many Americans (myself included) are thinking much more seriously now about visiting Cuba with the relaxed process. But don't expect it to be smooth yet—veteran traveler Brian Kelly, who runs  ThePointsGuy  (an extremely useful site...
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Road Trip, Day 1: City of Ten Thousand Buddhas and The Skunk

PortMoresby ·
  Gateway to the City of Ten Thousand Buddhas     March 9, 2015   In the late ‘80s, I lived in L.A. for a couple of years.  My S.O. knew lots of cool L.A. stuff.  One of those was something he’d read that...
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Road Trip, Day 2: Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden

PortMoresby ·
    March 10, 2015   I woke the first morning of my visit along the Northern California coast at a friend’s house in the village of Elk.  I was alone, the kitchen toasty warm from the fire Jane had made for me before leaving...
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Road Trip, More Day 2: Point Cabrillo Light Station

PortMoresby ·
  Not quite recovered from the long drive the day before, and having just walked a couple of miles around the Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, had I realized the extent of the hike required to get to and from the the lighthouse at Point...
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Why You should visit Nevada's Valley of Fire

DrFumblefinger ·
    Tired of the hustle and bustle of Las Vegas?  Had enough of the concrete canyons and smoked filled casinos of Sin City?  Not sure if it's day or night (there are no clocks allowed in Vegas casinos)?  Then you should do...
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Gumbo's Pic of the Day, April 27, 2015: Anne Hathaway's Cottage and Garden

DrFumblefinger ·
  One of the prettiest cottages anywhere, dating to the 15th century, is just a mile from Stratford on Avon.  Anne Hathaway lived in this 12 room home as a child.  She is best known for being the wife of the bard, William Shakespeare,...
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Coast-to-coast road trip...without a driver

PHeymont ·
Well, sort of without a driver. Delphi Automotive had a driver on board its highly-automated Audi S5, but only to a) satisfy local laws, and b) help out a bit less than 1% of the time as the Audi SQ5 which was chosen for its looks. Delphi added the...
 
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