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Where in the World is Gumbo #6

WheresG

 

As we all know by now, Gumbo is a restless soul.  This week's adventure finds our intrepid traveler beside a muddy canal.  The structure in the picture was built in one country by people from another country to link them with a settlement of people from a third country.  There have been several names for it.  Tell us the location (town and country) and at least one of the names.

 

Members, post your answers below by clicking on "Post Comment".  (If you aren't a member yet click HERE  to join, free & easy.)  Clues may or may not be given during the week depending on progress.  The answer will appear next Tuesday.

 

As always, no prize, just the pleasure of having been there or knowing how smart you are because you found the answer. 

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  • Where in the World is Gumbo, #6.

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"A settlement of people" is interesting. How about trading settlements? There were many European closed settlements. The Dutch in Japan, the British in China (Hong Kong, Shanghai), the Portuguese in Malacca and Macau...there were probably (in fact I'm pretty sure) Arab trading colonies as well... I think we're talking about a bridge into one of these trading settlements. 

Well, since Port Moresby appears to have traveled in a lot of places, that may not be a tell; I try when I'm the puzzler not to be too obvious about choosing from my most recent post or trip.

The best part of every trip is realizing that it has upset your expectations

JohnT...don't be misled by the Myanmar/Burma perplex. Port Moresby has actually contributed three interesting blogs from travels there, under the Burma name. Most recent one was on Dec. 7th 

 

Not that I'm saying that's where this is, because I don't know...

The best part of every trip is realizing that it has upset your expectations

O.K. So it's not in Japan or probably Malaysia or Indonesia. I think it unlikely that Port Moresby has been to Myanmar (though he certainly appears to be a very intrepid traveller). The more reading I do leads me to believe that it's most likely Port Moresby is referring to European trading within Macau, Canton, Hong Kong or perhaps Taiwan...so given that we think the bridge is...well, very old I would be leaning toward the Portuguese or the Dutch as one of the nations involved and China being one of the nations involve. The only way I can get three countries involved though that may fit would be a bridge built in Taiwan by the Chinese to trade with the Dutch... perhaps Port Moresby will leave us with a gem or at the very least a pearl of a clue tomorrow.

Originally Posted by PHeymont:  "I'm still sticking with my argument directly above: The bridge does not cross a border. The terms are very specific: It connects to "a settlement of people FROM a third country," not IN a third country."
 
Just to move the discussion forward a bit, PHeymont's analysis is correct.

 

Last edited by PortMoresby
Originally Posted by PHeymont:

I'm still sticking with my argument directly above: The bridge does not cross a border. The terms are very specific: It connects to "a settlement of people FROM a third country," not IN a third country.

I think PHeymont is correct.  

Twitter: @DrFumblefinger

"We do not take a trip, a trip takes us".  John Steinbeck, from Travels with Charlie

I'm still sticking with my argument directly above: The bridge does not cross a border. The terms are very specific: It connects to "a settlement of people FROM a third country," not IN a third country.

The best part of every trip is realizing that it has upset your expectations

OK. So we know it is Asian, and that it was built by colonizers/invaders from another country. Since the architecture is Asian, I think we can assume the invaders were, too.

 

The problem then is the next term: "link them with a settlement of people from a third country." That seems to imply that the "third country" people are NOT across a border in their own land but are also in the invaded country, but living separately from the invaders.

 

If I'm correct in guessing the bridge at upwards of 500 years old (pure guess) I'm thinking that the main potential invaders are either Chinese or Japanese (for some reason, I'm not sure, I'm excluding Mughal India. I'm not sure if I've advanced this, or just muddied the canal!

The best part of every trip is realizing that it has upset your expectations

The tiles in the center of the bridge make wonder if a former Portuguese colony is involved. So i'm going out there and say this is a border crossing between Malaysia and Malacca built by the Portuguese...it all works, you know...except for the architecture of the bridge itself....shrugs  

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