Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California. Where Gumbo Was, #74

 Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Gumbo was visiting historic Old Fisherman's Wharf in Monterey, California, not far from Cannery Row.  The photos in the puzzle focused on Harbor House, a novelty shop, at the entrance to Old Fisherman's Wharf, which has a faux lighthouse on its roof.  Congratulations to Roderick Simpson for being the first to correctly identify this location.  Lynn Miller also had the puzzle more or less figured out, but didn't quite pinpoint it.

 

Old Fisherman's Wharf has a long and colorful history.  Monterey's natural harbor was discovered by Europeans in the early seventeenth century when Sebastian Viscaino, a mariner, was sent to explore and map California's shore (with an eye to looking for safe harbors for treasure-laden Spanish galleons).  Viscaino landed in Monterey in 1602 and named the harbor after the Count of Monterey.  In 1770. the City of Monterey was founded and it was the capitol city of California until 1822, when the region transitioned from Spanish to Mexican control.  In 1846 the USA laid its claim to the territory.

 

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

The first wharf in Monterey was constructed privately in 1846 for freight service and passenger service.  The growth of the sardine industry prompted the City Council to assume ownership of the pier in 1913. (it was around this time it became known as "Fisherman's Wharf") .  The Wharf was expanded to provide improved services to the sardine fishing fleet, with the construction of warehouses, retail fish stores, restaurants and similar services.  

 

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

A marine accident in 1923 collapsed 132 feet of the wharf and in 1925 City officials started a drive for the construction of a new expanded cargo wharf to meet increasing commercial fishing demands and to relieve congestion on Old Fisherman's Wharf. The new Wharf (Municipal Wharf II) was completed in 1926.  In 1929 Congress appropriated funds for the construction of the present breakwater, completed in 1934.

 

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

When sardines began to disappear in Monterey Bay after World War II, Old Fisherman's Wharf converted to a tourist-oriented operation and its function has remained much the same since then, although with ever growing visitation and tourist trade.  Services include restaurants, gift and candy shops, snack bars, boat rentals, whale-watching and fishing cruises, and fish markets.  Construction of the adjoining Marina was completed in 1960.  

 

Fisherman's Wharf remains a popular destination for tourists and locals alike to walk around, enjoy the views and sea-breeze, and have a bite to eat.  Sea lions can often be found sleeping on the buoys or pilings and are always popular, especially with kids.  At the entrance to the wharf is the historic Custom House Plaza, site of the first government buildings in the region.  But that's a story for another day.

 

022 Monterey Wharf and Harbor

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

Old Fisherman's Wharf, Monterey, California

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Twitter: @DrFumblefinger

"We do not take a trip, a trip takes us".  John Steinbeck, from Travels with Charlie

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Looks a bit like the San Francisco Fisherman's Wharf. Lots of tourist attractions to help part you from your savings.

But the Sea Lions waving their fins to catch some sunlight make it all worthwhile.

Yes - I know - the kids love it - but watching who gets pushed off the floating boards to make room for the big fella is absolute poetry. Then he in turn pushes another Sea Lion off.

Fine explanation of the "pecking order"

Looks like a great location to spend the day - and pedestrian friendly too !

A great mix of the smells of nature.

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