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You mean like this one? '52 Chevy Styleline. The scary thing: When this car was new, the cars that were as old as this one is now...were made with tillers instead of steering wheels. I am old. 

52 styleline

The best part of every trip is realizing that it has upset your expectations

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Last edited by PHeymont

Hi folks

 

The yellow convertible is probably a 1951 Chevy. It's a bit hard to tell because some of the trim appears to be from a 1952 and/or another GM car from the era. The usual way to year-spot these cars is to look at the grille. Paul's photo of the red car correctly identifies it as a 1952, with the prominent 'teeth' in the grille. The yellow car doesn't appear to have the teeth, which would normally make it a '51... but who knows in Cuba??

 

Best regards,

Dave B.

Dave B.

 

Definitely a little tricky. I couldn't see the grille on the yellow, but on the 51s I saw when I was checking it out, the chrome over the front wheel isn't a straight piece like this (has a little widening with a model name, I think). On the other hand, this one is missing the small panel just before the rear wheel "skirt," but that could have been a victim of time...

The best part of every trip is realizing that it has upset your expectations

The side trim threw me for a loop. After I stared at it for a while, I came to the conclusion that at least part of it had been taken from a 4-door. On the 2-doors that used that type of trim, it ended near the back of the doors. 4-doors got a small additional piece for the rear doors which appears to have been added to this one. Also, the trim piece on the door doesn't taper at the back, which makes me wonder if it isn't a 4-door piece, too. My final trim note is that there is a 'script' above the trim at the very back of the car. I'm pretty sure that it was added at some point.

 

The missing trim pieces at the bottom of the rear fender curve are called 'gravel guards' and are very difficult to locate as well as being quite expensive. When I bought my '51 coupe, the right side guard was badly damaged. It took months of searching to find an original replacement ('restorers' love to chrome plate them... but they were originally polished stainless steel). Since they chose not to re-use them, the shop that did the paint on the yellow car would have had to either weld shut the mounting holes, or possibly just fill them with bondo...

Dave B.

 

Last edited by Dave B.
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