Château Frontenac, Quebec City (Where Gumbo was #181)

 

For WITW 181, Gumbo visited the most photographed hotel in the world, Château Frontenac, in Quebec City. Congratulations for finding Gumbo goes to Vivie, PortMoresby and George G.!

Chateau_Frontenac_and_Dufferin_Terrace_postcardImage of early postcard circa 1910/ McCord Museum

The Château Frontenac was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway as a stopover for CP travelers, and was opened in 1893. It was designed by American architect Bruce Price as one of a series of "château" style hotels built for CP. Newer portions of the hotel, including the central tower in 1924, were designed by Canadian architect William Sutherland Maxwell.

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The hotel sits atop a tall cape, Cap Diamant, that overlooks the Saint Lawrence river. The hotel is the most prominent feature of Quebec City's skyline. Château Frontenac was named after the flamboyant Louis de Buade, Count of Frontenac. He was the governor of New France from 1672 to 1682 and  again from 1689 to 1698.

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The Chateau has an impressive history of world leaders and famous people who visited.  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill were hosted by Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King and discussed strategy for WW2 at the Quebec Conferences in 1943 and 1944. President Reagan and Prime Minister Mulroney also showcased a new closer relationship between the US and Canada there in the so called "Shamrock Summit" in 1985.

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What impressed me the most about the hotel was the details. Definitely deserves its fame.  As great as the location and view of the hotel  is, the subtle touches also deserve a closer look. Take some time to walk around the hotel and do go inside.

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