Tagged With "Barcelona"

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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

PHeymont ·
A lot of questions! Let me try a few answers... Absolutely I'd say stop in Iceland. Every place in the world is unique, but Iceland is more so, geographically, in climate, and in history. Half a week (or even a week) won't do more than scratch the surface, but you'll be able to visit incredible waterfalls, climb on glaciers, see evidence of recent volcanic activity, and realize that under it all is a huge pool of thermally heated water that provides over 70% of the nation's energy. If that...
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

PHeymont ·
Well, I said so much about Iceland, I decided to leave the rest for another post. Getting from Barcelona (or Madrid) to Lisbon: the only practical way is to fly. Train takes too long for this one, and costs more! From Barcelona to Lisbon, flights on Vueling, Iberia, TAP, etc. run from $35 one-way to about $80 before you hit the high-priced ones. I just looked in May; Vueling and Iberia have $68 in the morning and $35 at 7:30 pm. Madrid-Lisbon, there's a $40 mid-day flight, but most other...
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

DrFumblefinger ·
PHeymont has given you some excellent advice, Travel Luver. By all means, spend some time in Iceland. If you can fit it into your trip, 4 days would be my minimum stay here. As Paul pointed out so well, Iceland is unique. It is also very sparsely populated, with only 300,000 people on the island and two thirds of those living in Reykjavik. And it is a newly form volcanic land with tons of glaciers, waterfalls, and geothermal events. So by all means, see it. When you land at Keflavik airport...
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

Gulliver ·
Hey, I don't know if anyone mentioned it, but no matter how cold it is, they keep the outdoor pools open in Iceland with underground hot water. We went to the Blue Lagoon in February, and it was funny...usually people get OUT of a pool because they are getting cold, but there we stayed IN to keep warm!
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

voyager ·
Hot springs are to die for. You always see pictures of the Blue Lagoon. Are there other places to go for a warm swim in Iceland ?
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

DrFumblefinger ·
Originally Posted by voyager: Hot springs are to die for. You always see pictures of the Blue Lagoon. Are there other places to go for a warm swim in Iceland ? There are lots of places to go for geothermal swims in Iceland, Voyager. Almost every small city and town has a public geothermal pool. The most famous is the Blue Lagoon, but it's also quite pricy, especially if you go for a family. This website gives you some idea of all the pools you can access in Iceland. Here's that link.
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

chatterbot2 ·
I never knew that there are public geothermal pools all over Iceland. No one has mentioned this before. This is terrific to know. thanks
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

Travel Luver ·
Well, thanks everyone. You've been great and this has all been very helpful. So yes, I will go to Iceland for 4 days. I will base myself at a hostel in Reykjavik (all I can afford), and I'll do 2 day trip tours, still researching which ones but those recommended look great. And I love hot springs, so I plan to soak the evenings away after enjoying the "youth scene" over there. I need to check out a good Icelandic beer. Any recommendations. And I will visit Iceland at the of my trip, rather...
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

DrFumblefinger ·
You're most welcome, Travel Luver! Give the VIKING beer a try -- it's pretty good. And made with that great Icelandic water that has a unique taste (and pleasant at that). Also be sure to try their Coca Cola, made with Icelandic water and sugar (not corn syrup as in North America) -- definitely a better product.
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Re: Is a stopover in Iceland worthwhile

PHeymont ·
Speaking of good things to eat, stop in a local store for some skyr--that's Icelandic yogurt made from skimmed milk. Slightly tart and wholly delicious.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Sept. 15, 2013: Grazing in Barcelona's Bouqueria Market

DrFumblefinger ·
I love visiting local markets. I try to make a point of seeing one every trip if possible. Sometimes you can pick up great gifts from these (eg. tea, spices). Another place I like to visit when I can is the local library. The quality of a library tells me a lot about a people and the values they and their government have.
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Re: Catalunya: What to Know Before You Go

Travel Rob ·
Great piece! Thanks for sharing why the Catalan language is so important. I'll make sure to learn a few words before my next trip.
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Re: Catalunya: What to Know Before You Go

Ava ·
How timely! I was just in Catalunya this past week on a trip to visit PortAventura World and Tarragona. I loved experiencing the local culture - and previous to my trip I had no idea that Spain wasn't more homogeneous.
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Re: Catalunya: What to Know Before You Go

DrFumblefinger ·
Speak about timely -- I leave for Barcelona next weekend! Thanks for the great post, Olivia.
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Re: Catalunya: What to Know Before You Go

PHeymont ·
Barcelona's one of my favorite destinations...thanks not only for taking me back, but for helping me see better part of what attracts me!
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Re: Catalunya: What to Know Before You Go

RoadWorrier ·
Hey, really beautiful pix! Love to hear more about food and all!
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Re: 'Uncomfortable memory' tour faces Barcelona slave history

DrFumblefinger ·
It is good that a people face up to and learn from the past. We must learn from the lessons of history, but I do hope this will not become a "self-flagellation" exercise. At the end of the 18th century, everyone had slaves. Every people, every race, every culture, every country participated in the buying, selling and owning of other people. It was the norm. Fortunately, with a few rare exceptions, modern society has become enlightened and the rights of individuals is now a central focus of...
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Re: 'Uncomfortable memory' tour faces Barcelona slave history

PHeymont ·
'Presentism' is always a danger for historians, but in this case, there's a real issue of interest based on the late-in-the-day entry into slave-owning by the later Catalan grandees; they went into it when all European countries had already abolished it, and when it had been abolished in many colonial areas. Sadly, not Cuba, Brazil, or, at the beginning of that period, the United States. One of the reasons it's important to consider these past things is because they do enter into the...
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Re: 'Uncomfortable memory' tour faces Barcelona slave history

GarryRF ·
Slavery is just part of a long cruel history. Wherever there is chance to make money, people of any race or creed will gladly join in. Even the African warlords who sold the "prisoners" to the slave ships played their parts in this piece of history. Even today fortunes are made by sending young men to die in the name of "Defence". Money has no morals.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 21, 2014: Tapas Bar Delights

GarryRF ·
A very civilised way of grabbing a snack when you're on the go. The Tapas Bar has become a success across Europe.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Feb. 21, 2015: Fitness Reminder

PortMoresby ·
Was there another in Spanish (and French, Italian, German...) or are only English speakers perceived to need reminding?
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Feb. 21, 2015: Fitness Reminder

PHeymont ·
Perhaps further down the beach. Or perhaps only we were thought to be over-concerned enough about fitness to get the joke.
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Re: Marveling at La Sagrada Familia

Travel Rob ·
Thank you Karina. You gave me me another reason to get back to Barcelona. Great job capturing the splendor of the place!
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Re: Marveling at La Sagrada Familia

PHeymont ·
I've taken a lot of pictures outside Sagrada Familia and a few inside, but none of my inside pictures capture the light, space and shapes as these do—great! I'm not Gaudi's biggest fan (I've confessed that elsewhere here), but even if he had nothing but this place to his credit, he'd have earned that title: Genius.
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Re: Marveling at La Sagrada Familia

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks for sharing this experience, Karina! Your photos of the interior are amazing. I've yet to visit Barcelona but it's definitely moved far up my list.
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Re: On the Beach: A sculptural homage to La Barceloneta (Where Gumbo Was #34)

Jonathan L ·
I love Barceloneta, and I do believe I emailed the correct answer. On to #35.
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Re: On the Beach: A sculptural homage to La Barceloneta (Where Gumbo Was #34)

PHeymont ·
Jonathan L did indeed identify the location...the e-mail was overlooked while writing the report!
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 22, 2013: Fantastic Skylight in Barcelona

GarryRF ·
Thanks for the photo Pheymont. I adore ornate ceilings. Something from the past you don't get repeated today. This is in the Cunard Building in Liverpool. Built in 1914. Before it moved its HQ to New York in the 60's.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 22, 2013: Fantastic Skylight in Barcelona

PHeymont ·
That's gorgeous! By coincidence, I was in Cunard's New York booking hall from about the same period last week...it is now a bank. I will try to find a picture.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Dec. 22, 2013: Fantastic Skylight in Barcelona

PHeymont ·
Well, turns out to be a moment of mis-identification. The building I was in, 1 Broadway, had been the offices of United States Lines; Cunard was up the street at 25 Broadway. I haven't a picture yet for the booking hall-turned-bank, but here are two shots of Cunard's Great Hall, which is now a postal facility.
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Re: Paris-Barcelona Now Linked by High-Speed Train

DrFumblefinger ·
Great thing about Europe, especially for travelers, are the many options they have for getting around. Train is often the best option for those going from the heart of one city to the heart of another. I'm glad to her this route is now open to people.
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Re: Spain's booming tourism hits record numbers

DrFumblefinger ·
Most countries would envy Spain this particular problem. Given how week other aspects of their economy are, I can't see the government putting a stop on this, despite the actions of some mayors. I'd suggest they look at diverting tourists to less traveled parts of the country. Spain is a large place and there are lots of places tourists hardly ever go.
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Re: Strictly for the Birds...

PHeymont ·
While searching for some other photos, I came across these two that might have joined the birds above. One is a scene of well-mannered pigeons on a rail at the Musee Rodin in Paris, perhaps waiting their turn to annoy diners in the garden cafe; the other is yet another of those ironic meetings of statue-fied dignity with feathered pit stop...
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

Travel Rob ·
Another part of the agreement is of interest to US travelers. We can only spend 90 days in the Schengen country for every 180 day period,without having to contend with Visas . I haven't heard too much about the consequences of overstaying the 90 days ,until I saw this comment online about getting a $500 fine for overstaying. http://www.latimes.com/travel/...-20150405-story.html More info on the 90/180 day rule http://www.latimes.com/travel/...20150329-story.html#
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

Travel Rob ·
I don't share the nostalgia for border crossings, having experienced some of the worst crossings in the world in the late 80's And while Schengen said it wiped out land borders for travelers throughout most of Europe, I've still experienced controls in those countries . On one such occasion ,I took a bus from Brussels to Paris and the bus was stopped twice in France. ID was checked and people questioned. Even bags were inspected for people from Romania and Bulgaria.
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

PHeymont ·
Interesting, given the history of prejudice against Romany, that those countries were singled out. At the time they were not yet Schengen members, either, although they are now in the process of joining, leaving only Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland and UK out among EU members. The non-EU members of Schengen are Norway, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Iceland.
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Re: Happy No-Border Birthday! Schengen celebrates 20 years

DrFumblefinger ·
From a historic perspective, I think it's still a little early to know if this was all good for Europe or not. The border crossings are definitely easier and faster, and I, too, miss the passport stamps no longer on my pages. For me the greatest convenience is the common currency -- not having to change money so often, usually at a loss. Of course, some would argue that the Euro is the greatest weakness of the EU (will it survive?), so I'm not sure in the long run how this will all play out.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan. 26, 2014: Big City, Small Details

PortMoresby ·
For another urban perspective, from Pheymont's details to the photographs of Michael Wolf's Hong Kong, large scale " Architecture of Density ", currently at Flowers Gallery, London. Don't neglect to click on "#39" on the gallery page for more images.
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Re: Gumbo's Pic of the Day, Jan. 26, 2014: Big City, Small Details

PHeymont ·
Unbelievable density...unimaginable to me to live in such a tight space. It started a discussion here at home on the viability of cities, whether we could, with Marge Piercy, look forward to a future where cities do not exist—or to a future where, free of some of the economic and political structures of today, we could guarantee cities that are a pleasure to live in. In the meantime...I wish I could be in London to see these pictures at gallery size.
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Re: Barcelona's "Other Architect"

DrFumblefinger ·
Fascinating piece, Pheymont! I learned a lot. The architecture is a feast for the eyes. Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Barcelona's "Other Architect"

Travel Rob ·
Thanks for the excellent info!Great Photos too!I havent been to Barcelona in a number of years so I guess it's time to return.
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Re: La Boqueria Market. 2) Produce

GarryRF ·
An absolute feast of colour. It's what cameras were invented for. Much better than candy.
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Re: La Boqueria Market. 3) Meats and Seafood

GarryRF ·
There are so many things there that I wouldn't eat. Many because I don't know what they are. But just looking is an amazing journey into the unknown. Many cheaper meats - like pigs feet and tripe - are now more "fashionable". But hold memories of my youth. I didn't like them then. But broadening the imagination is a must - unless we just stand still and stagnate.
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Re: La Boqueria Market. 3) Meats and Seafood

DrFumblefinger ·
Thanks GarryRF! Excepts for brains and eyeballs and a few internal organs, I'd be game for most of these cuts. But am especially attracted to the fresh seafood
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Re: La Boqueria Market. 3) Meats and Seafood

GarryRF ·
You've just reminded me - Haslet. Last time I ate that was when I discovered it was made from brains ! Of course you have an advantage being a professional - but being so familiar with "body bits" would turn me vegetarian. My wife - an operating theatre nurse - always comments on TV cookery shows when the Chef remarks on the " Juices flowing from fresh kidneys" when they're being fried. "That's not juice - it's.....! " ...... Yes, thank you - I know what it is !!
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